Your opinions on Seachem acid and alkalinity buffer? - The Planted Tank Forum
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 12 (permalink) Old 07-20-2015, 10:54 PM Thread Starter
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
jcmv4792's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: usa
Posts: 656
Your opinions on Seachem acid and alkalinity buffer?

My tap water is around PH 7.8. Ideally I'd like to have this around 7.0 for the type of fish I want to keep in my 55 gallon. Are these good products?(If not, what do you suggest to lower the ph?).

Will using buffers be costly? I'm wondering if I will have to keep buying these, or if they usually last a long time.
jcmv4792 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 12 (permalink) Old 07-20-2015, 11:16 PM
Planted Tank Guru
 
Raymond S.'s Avatar
 
PTrader: (6/100%)
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Hot Springs Ar. 71901
Posts: 5,935
Using this in your filter is better. IF you don't have anything in your tank that is
raising the PH like coral or Argonite sand or Limestone then those chemicals will
work until you change the water.
Someone on here who uses the Peat can/will give you more details on how much and
how long it last for and if there's a preferred brand etc.
http://www.amazon.com/s?ie=UTF8&page...%20peat%20moss

The shortest distance between any two points is a straight line...in the opposite direction...
Raymond S. is offline  
post #3 of 12 (permalink) Old 07-20-2015, 11:18 PM
Algae Grower
 
jorstrick's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Clovis, Ca
Posts: 104
I've been using controsoil after my last rescape and it keeps my pH between 6 and 7 but it's kinda expensive

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using Tapatalk
jorstrick is offline  
 
post #4 of 12 (permalink) Old 07-21-2015, 06:19 AM
Planted Tank Guru
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Contra Costa CA
Posts: 11,721
pH is not a stand alone value.
The minerals in the water control the pH.
To control the pH, you need to look into what minerals are in your water, and remove some. Or dilute them with reverse osmosis or distilled water.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

More important than pH is the GH (General Hardness) of the water.
Fish that are said to prefer lower pH really prefer low mineral levels, and low levels of all the things dissolved in the water. It is not good to add more stuff to the water just to target a particular pH, when you are chasing the wrong target.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Test the tap water (or get a report from the water company).
GH (general hardness)
KH (carbonate hardness, or alkalinity)
pH on some tap water right out of the tap
pH on some tap water after it has sat out for 24-48 hours.

-------------------------------------------------------------------

What fish do you want to keep, and what references are you using that you want to target a pH of 7.0?
Diana is offline  
post #5 of 12 (permalink) Old 07-21-2015, 01:00 PM
Algae Grower
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Rhode Island
Posts: 62
throw some driftwood in there, let the tannic compounds do the work. if you're fine with tea water that is. personally I like it & it fits my rio negro biotope theme. keeps my pH at 6.5 in a 30gal
windelov is offline  
post #6 of 12 (permalink) Old 07-21-2015, 02:10 PM
Algae Grower
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Rocklin, CA
Posts: 40
I use pieces of petrified wood in my tanks both as decoration and anchors/tie downs and I have found that they naturally help to lower the ph levels and soften the water where I live. Plus they look awesome IMO ( I like rocks )
post #7 of 12 (permalink) Old 07-21-2015, 05:13 PM Thread Starter
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
jcmv4792's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: usa
Posts: 656
Quote:
Originally Posted by windelov View Post
throw some driftwood in there, let the tannic compounds do the work. if you're fine with tea water that is. personally I like it & it fits my rio negro biotope theme. keeps my pH at 6.5 in a 30gal
Quote:
Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
I use pieces of petrified wood in my tanks both as decoration and anchors/tie downs and I have found that they naturally help to lower the ph levels and soften the water where I live. Plus they look awesome IMO ( I like rocks )


Ah I just boiled the tannins out of all my drift wood haha. Oh well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Diana View Post
pH is not a stand alone value.
The minerals in the water control the pH.
To control the pH, you need to look into what minerals are in your water, and remove some. Or dilute them with reverse osmosis or distilled water.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

More important than pH is the GH (General Hardness) of the water.
Fish that are said to prefer lower pH really prefer low mineral levels, and low levels of all the things dissolved in the water. It is not good to add more stuff to the water just to target a particular pH, when you are chasing the wrong target.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Test the tap water (or get a report from the water company).
GH (general hardness)
KH (carbonate hardness, or alkalinity)
pH on some tap water right out of the tap
pH on some tap water after it has sat out for 24-48 hours.

-------------------------------------------------------------------

What fish do you want to keep, and what references are you using that you want to target a pH of 7.0?
Thanks, I just ordered a gh and kh test kit from API.

I'm not sure on the exact species but I know I'd like schooling fish(preferably those that swim tight and uniformly), lots of dwarf shrimp, and some snails.

I've just been going through some fish profiles and most of the ones I'd like seem to have a maximum recommended ph of 7.5(usually lower), and most say "soft to medium hard". I'll have to run a test on my water to see where it's at.
jcmv4792 is offline  
post #8 of 12 (permalink) Old 07-21-2015, 06:12 PM
Algae Grower
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Rhode Island
Posts: 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcmv4792 View Post
Ah I just boiled the tannins out of all my drift wood haha. Oh well.
You'd be surprised, even after a boil there still might be some tannic compounds leaching out. Definitely not as many as uncured wood, but if youre going for lower pH and softer water, they wont hurt. I have no idea if it will be enough to cause any detectable difference in any test kit, but the wood may continue to leach a small amount.
windelov is offline  
post #9 of 12 (permalink) Old 07-21-2015, 08:35 PM
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: May 2015
Location: the desert
Posts: 541
I use acid buffer and alkaline buffer to raise KH and adjust PH since I use RO water which has no KH. If my tap water was consistent I would just use it even if the parameters were a little off from ideal because it is really about the consistency of the water more than the specific values of GH KH and PH for most plants and fish. If your PH is between 6 and 8.5 then your fish will probably be fine unless you have some delicate animals with very specific needs.
keymastr is offline  
post #10 of 12 (permalink) Old 07-23-2015, 06:28 PM Thread Starter
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
jcmv4792's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: usa
Posts: 656
alright just got my gh/kh test in. The results are: kh -7, gh- 10
jcmv4792 is offline  
post #11 of 12 (permalink) Old 07-24-2015, 02:14 AM
Planted Tank Guru
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Contra Costa CA
Posts: 11,721
KH controls the pH.
With a KH of 7 German degrees of hardness it will be difficult to control the pH. Anything you add to drop the pH will not work for long, and the carbonates will make the pH rise again.

GH is too high for specialty fish that need soft water, and at the upper end of most community fish.

Try this:
Get some reverse osmosis water (a gallon is fine, grocery store or fish store) or distilled water.

Make a few blends of tap + RO. Make a cup or two of each recipe. Try:
25% tap + 75% RO
50/50
75% tap + 25% RO

Test GH, KH and pH in these blends. See which comes closest to the ideal paramters for your fish. (go by the GH).

Then add a handful of Peat Moss.
Stir, and let it sit overnight.

Test GH, KH and pH.

If this does what you want, then you will have to go into the water production end of aquarium keeping.

To set up the tank, make enough of the recipe to fill the tank, and a little more (to prime the filter).
When you are thinking about doing a water change you will need to prepare the water ahead of time. I would do this in a Rubbermaid Brute garbage can on wheels, and roll it into each room with tanks that needed that kind of water. I used a knee-hi stocking full of peat moss for the black water fish. I got several uses out of this much, though it would take a bit longer as the peat moss aged.

Top off evaporation with RO water.

__________________________________________________ __________

Alternate method:
Select fish that thrive in your water.

Last edited by Diana; 07-24-2015 at 02:26 AM. Reason: *
Diana is offline  
post #12 of 12 (permalink) Old 07-24-2015, 02:19 AM Thread Starter
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
jcmv4792's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: usa
Posts: 656
Quote:
Originally Posted by Diana View Post
KH controls the pH.
With a KH of 7 German degrees of hardness it will be difficult to control the pH. Anything you add to drop the pH will not work for long, and the carbonates will make the pH rise again.

GH is too high for specialty fish that need soft water, and at the upper end of most community fish.

Try this:
Get some reverse osmosis water (a gallon is fine, grocery store or fish store) or distilled water.

Make a few blends of tap + RO. Make a cup or two of each recipe. Try:
25% tap + 75% RO
50/50
75% tap + 25% RO

Test GH, KH and pH in these blends. See which comes closest to the ideal paramters for your fish. (go by the GH).

Then add a handful of Peat Moss.
Stir, and let it sit overnight.

Test GH, KH and pH.

If this does what you want, then you will have to go into the water production end of aquarium keeping.

To set up the tank, make enough of the recipe to fill the tank, and a little more (to prime the filter).
When you are thinking about doing a water change you will need to prepare the water ahead of time. I would do this in a Rubbermaid Brute garbage can on wheels, and roll it into each room with tanks that needed that kind of water.

Top off evaporation with RO water.

__________________________________________________ __________

Alternate method:
Select fish that thrive in your water.
Thanks for the info. I think I will go with the alternate method LOL. Seems like the work required will outweigh the fun of keeping a tank(unless you're a serious aquarist)
jcmv4792 is offline  
Reply

Tags
None

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Planted Tank Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome