Article on not quarantining your fish? - The Planted Tank Forum
 
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post #1 of 6 (permalink) Old 07-10-2015, 01:54 AM Thread Starter
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Article on not quarantining your fish?

Hi all,

I came across this article and wanted a few opinions. Sounds interesting but against what most people say.

http://briansaquariumcare.com/quarantine.html
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post #2 of 6 (permalink) Old 07-10-2015, 02:45 AM
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First off the article doesn't completely disparage quarantining, it just disparages the way most people do.

He's not wrong as far as the stress goes, but there is some debate available to how do you view fish. Are they viewed as pets on the individual basis or more as livestock where health of the whole is more important than the health of the individual.

In the livestock scenario, a stressed environment is a good way to show which disease pathogens are present, it also helps identify the weak which can lead to a stronger overall group.

A lot of ways to discuss quarantining and I would state that those who do quarantine probably lose more fish overall than those who do not, but one we are hopefully getting a better overall quality fish making it to our display tank and avoiding more of the major disease factors. In effect if the disease doesn't show itself in the quarantine tank, it's fairly unlikely it will show itself in the display tank.
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post #3 of 6 (permalink) Old 07-12-2015, 06:41 PM
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Horrible article.

No one has ever created a quarantine tank with pure tap water. Even the newset and worst aquarium keeper would use water from the display tank.

The idiot who wrote that article thinks parasites like ich are simply a disease that cures itself. That is woefully ignorant.

Finally, he argues that since zoos use a 2 month quarantine that a 2 week is useless. The reason zoos are so paranoid is that they frequently have a truly massive system(thousands of gallons) and removing fish to a smaller system is financially infeasible. So, they don't want to dose meds into their massive system in case something bad happens(see Texas State Aquarium). If a total tank failure cost you $5 million, you would do a 2 month quarantine too.

My personal favorite quarantine system is a bucket. 5 gallons and low light. It makes inspection difficult, but its cheap and easy for meds. I keep a 10 gallon for new fish, but if you know your going to have a fish on meds for weeks and need it out of the way, get the bucket.

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post #4 of 6 (permalink) Old 07-12-2015, 07:47 PM
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It does not matter if you are running a $5 millon set up or a $50.00 set up- Keeping the existing fish safe, and not having to medicate the display tank are very good reasons to quarantine new fish. You might have fish or shrimp in the main tank that cannot tolerate the treatment that the new fish need, or are particularly susceptible to certain diseases.

The Q-tank ought to be low stress for the fish, which generally means hiding places, shade from the light, and (of course) high quality water. You need to be able to see the fish, so a couple of rocks and some drifting plant trimmings is plenty.
Bare bottom need not be stressful, put something dark under the tank, or put a light scattering of fine gravel or coarse sand on the bottom.

A month of quarantine will show most of the common diseases (Columnaris) and parasites (Ich) that show up on store-bought fish. Longer probably won't show some of the slowest moving diseases (Mycobacteriosis).
It gives you a chance to medicate for internal parasites. You can add a UV sterilizer for several days or a week if you suspect Ich or other problems. But turn it off before you start the 1 month quarantine after these meds are cleared from the water, and after turning off the UV. Do not combine UV and meds- the UV may deactivate the meds.

I disagree about the water.

Test the water in the bag for GH, KH, TDS, pH.
Set up the Q-tank with water that matches these parameters. This is easy- when you plan to get fish set up the Q-tank with fairly soft water. When you get the fish and test the water they are in you can add minerals etc. to match the water.

During the month the fish are in the Q-tank you can do plenty of water changes to gradually alter the conditions to match the display tank. This slow acclimation allows the fish to alter their metabolism to deal with the altered water parameters.
This specifically includes CO2- Many of us with planted tanks are running a lot of CO2. Fish are OK with this, but usually need some acclimation to it. You should not add new fish to a tank running high levels of CO2.
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post #5 of 6 (permalink) Old 07-13-2015, 05:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Diana View Post
It does not matter if you are running a $5 millon set up or a $50.00 set up- Keeping the existing fish safe, and not having to medicate the display tank are very good reasons to quarantine new fish. You might have fish or shrimp in the main tank that cannot tolerate the treatment that the new fish need, or are particularly susceptible to certain diseases.
This is a very valid point.
My only reason for making the point was that zoos and similar have insanely rigorous standards because it is worth it. You need to consider the value added when doing your quarantine.

If you are setting up a new tank with cheap fish, then a 1 or 2 week quarantine is fine. If any of the fish do present later you can easily pull them from the tank. It just isn't worth it to go for 3 months with an empty display tank just so that you can be 100% certain.
i.e. I have a RCS tank that needs an oto. I bought 5 zebra otos. They are going to get dumped into the shrimp tank right away. If they have ich, I can remove them without hurting the shrimp and put them in quarantine.

If you are adding 1 fish to a well-established tank with a lot of expensive/sensitive fish then I would follow a much more rigorous quarantine procedure.
i.e. I have a heavily planted discus tank and I want to add some a few emerald cories. Those cories are going to spend months in quarantine.
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post #6 of 6 (permalink) Old 07-14-2015, 02:10 AM
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Thanks for this discussion, I was also wondering about that article!
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