PH level in planted tank - The Planted Tank Forum
 
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post #1 of 13 (permalink) Old 06-28-2014, 08:33 PM Thread Starter
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PH level in planted tank

The ph level in my tank is 8. Does ph have any affect on plants?
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post #2 of 13 (permalink) Old 06-28-2014, 10:06 PM
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It hasn't had any effect on my plants so far, about a month+ into being planted. I have very hard water, HR pH 8.2. But there are lots of minerals in hard water; much less in soft water.
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post #3 of 13 (permalink) Old 06-28-2014, 11:08 PM
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GH is what you should be more concerned about. Plants prefer low gH (I've heard that 2 is optimal if you don't have livestock but since I do I aim for 4-6). High gH leads to algae issues and less optimal growth in some species.

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post #4 of 13 (permalink) Old 06-28-2014, 11:25 PM
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My ph is 8.1-8.3 and it hasn't hurt any of my plants so far. Whenever I leave and have someone else watch them though that's a different story.
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post #5 of 13 (permalink) Old 06-29-2014, 12:11 AM
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Originally Posted by Axelrodi202 View Post
GH is what you should be more concerned about. Plants prefer low gH (I've heard that 2 is optimal if you don't have livestock but since I do I aim for 4-6). High gH leads to algae issues and less optimal growth in some species.
My gH is 17-18. So far fish are fine and no serious algae problems, though I do have 2 busy BNs.
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post #6 of 13 (permalink) Old 06-29-2014, 03:21 AM
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Actually almost all aquarium plants will grow just fine in a very wide range of mineral levels.

There are a few special plants that do require low mineral levels, and won't grow in any form of hard water, but they are not many. There are some fish like that, too. High mineral levels in the water means minerals accumulating in their body in ways they cannot get rid of.

As suggested above, look at the GH to see what fish will accept the water. pH is not unimportant, but is not the number one important test.
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post #7 of 13 (permalink) Old 06-29-2014, 03:27 AM
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Actually almost all aquarium plants will grow just fine in a very wide range of mineral levels.

There are a few special plants that do require low mineral levels, and won't grow in any form of hard water, but they are not many.
I find that a lot of the more high tech stems, such as many Rotala sp., Ludwigia senegalensis, and Eriocaulon sp. tend to need soft water to do their best. Can't really think of any instances of plants that are the other way around, perhaps except for Vallisneria sp.

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post #8 of 13 (permalink) Old 06-29-2014, 03:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Axelrodi202 View Post
I find that a lot of the more high tech stems, such as many Rotala sp., Ludwigia senegalensis, and Eriocaulon sp. tend to need soft water to do their best. Can't really think of any instances of plants that are the other way around, perhaps except for Vallisneria sp.
This would seem to be taking a rather limited view of nature. Many areas have very hard alkaline water. And many plants do grow naturally in that water. Most of the springs in my current area have lush plant growth. As stated, there are some that won't but it is really easy to find the ones which do.
I find we limit ourselves more by what we worry about rather than being limited by what the plants will accept.
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post #9 of 13 (permalink) Old 06-29-2014, 03:59 PM
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I've about convinced myself that there are way too many factors to ever make a set determination of what we can grow, however reading the experiences of others combined with set established parameters helps us make decisions on how much effort or money we will spend on any particular plant.

For example, everything I read tells me Pogo's and Val's should do well in my tank, yet I've tried them both three times with the same results, yet there are other plants that should not do well that are growing like weeds.

There are way to many specific and local environmental issues in our tanks to make valid determinations for a specific plant making it or not making it, we can however ponder semi-educated guesses why but that's it. And unless your Tom Barr who has devoted his considerable intelligence, ungodly amount of time and God knows how much money, then you will probably never know the why.

I've become more pragmatic, if it doesn't cost a fortune, buy it and try it, if it lives it lives, if not..................
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post #10 of 13 (permalink) Old 06-29-2014, 08:29 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Axelrodi202 View Post
GH is what you should be more concerned about. Plants prefer low gH (I've heard that 2 is optimal if you don't have livestock but since I do I aim for 4-6). High gH leads to algae issues and less optimal growth in some species.
When you say gh is 2 (newbie here ) does that mean 2 drops? Mine is 11 drops or 196.9ppm.
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post #11 of 13 (permalink) Old 06-29-2014, 08:34 PM
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If you have gH in ppm, you can divide by 17.848 to get gH in degrees. In my post I was using degrees.

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post #12 of 13 (permalink) Old 06-29-2014, 09:18 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by MeCasa View Post
I've about convinced myself that there are way too many factors to ever make a set determination of what we can grow, however reading the experiences of others combined with set established parameters helps us make decisions on how much effort or money we will spend on any particular plant.

For example, everything I read tells me Pogo's and Val's should do well in my tank, yet I've tried them both three times with the same results, yet there are other plants that should not do well that are growing like weeds.

There are way to many specific and local environmental issues in our tanks to make valid determinations for a specific plant making it or not making it, we can however ponder semi-educated guesses why but that's it. And unless your Tom Barr who has devoted his considerable intelligence, ungodly amount of time and God knows how much money, then you will probably never know the why.

I've become more pragmatic, if it doesn't cost a fortune, buy it and try it, if it lives it lives, if not..................
I am finding this out about aquarium plants; lots of trials and errors, but I'm getting a handle on it. I have 2 2.5 gallons I use just to throw clippings in and see what happens...amazing! I am tempted to get another bigger tank just for growing.
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post #13 of 13 (permalink) Old 06-29-2014, 10:37 PM
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I was somewhat the same way on starting. I had all kinds of concerns about my lights, water, PH and GH. My water is 7.8 PH and 18 grains hardness or about 300 PPM so there seemed to be lots of question on what would grow but I kind of backed into it by accident. I looked around and there are lots of plants growing wild so, why not? As I got the CO2 and some plants as part of a tank deal, I just went with finding what would work without the extra burden of cost concerns. It was mostly free so if it failed, I would just not do plants.
I get the feeling my fish and plants often grow in spite of what I do rather than because of my tender loving care!!! When I get around to working it too hard the fun is gone and there may not be much improvement to show so I've stopped sweating the small stuff.
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