Levels in aquarium for plants - The Planted Tank Forum
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 8 (permalink) Old 06-07-2014, 11:43 PM Thread Starter
Algae Grower
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Georgia
Posts: 94
Levels in aquarium for plants

I want some of my plants raised up because I think they'd look better if they were behind some taller plants. I've seen aquascaping photos of the same thing done, but my question is how? I don't want to just make a hill from the substrate because I want to keep as much space for the fish as possible. I thought about making a small stack of rock or slate caves and putting the plants on top of that, but I think most of the plants I want to do this with need to be kept in substrate and that would just be swept off the tops of the caves - same reason I don't think I could just tie them onto some driftwood like I could with moss and java fern. Any tips from the pros and/or people more creative than I am?
NiaCas is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 8 (permalink) Old 06-08-2014, 12:45 AM
Planted Tank Guru
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Contra Costa CA
Posts: 11,721
If you make a rock wall or hill you can build in pockets for the plant roots.

Grow taller plants. Then, even if they are in the substrate they will fill the middle and upper areas.

Tie other things on driftwood:
Java Fern (several varieties with wider or narrower leaves, and different shaped leaves.)
Bolbitis (A fern that looks more like a fern that Java Fern)
Anubias (Many varieties, leaves are very small to very large, and some different shapes)

Use magnets or suction cups to attach pots to the sides of the tank.
Diana is offline  
post #3 of 8 (permalink) Old 06-08-2014, 01:19 AM
Planted Tank Guru
 
PlantedRich's Avatar
 
PTrader: (2/100%)
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 11,905
I have African cichlids and some of the types I have like caves. I also wanted plants higher in the back. My way was to form caves off limestone rock and put plants in pots on top. Then cover and hide the pots with more rocks. This lets the mbuna who like the rocks, hide in the cave and the ones who don't use rocks can stay above.
If you have one of the little tile saws, you can also slice off edges of rock to form a ledge around dirt that is just on top of flat rocks. A line of silicon can fill the voids between the rocks. Done like this the front looks more natural with a series of layers laid down.
PlantedRich is offline  
 
post #4 of 8 (permalink) Old 06-10-2014, 12:36 AM
Planted Tank Guru
 
lochaber's Avatar
 
PTrader: (1/100%)
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Oakland, CA
Posts: 2,318
If you can find some chunks of pumice (I think it's usually marketed as 'feather rock'), that's pretty easy to cut/drill/carve up. Just wear gloves and a mask, and try to keep the rock wet.
You could carve up caves, or even little rock planters pretty easily. Only problem is that pumice often floats, so you'd have to silicone it to the tank or something.

I've seen People make caves and such out of chunks of lava rock, but that's a lot more difficult to work with.

Or you could try an epoxy/sand mix and molding your own, or coating something else with it.

Take a look at what some people have done to make paludarium backgrounds. They usually have pockets for planting, so you could do pretty much the same thing, except all underwater, and have the pockets just be raised beds or something.
lochaber is offline  
post #5 of 8 (permalink) Old 06-10-2014, 12:57 AM
Fresh Fish Freak
 
lauraleellbp's Avatar
 
PTrader: (70/100%)
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Tampa, Florida
Posts: 24,403
I kept some crypts in black plastic pots hidden behind a bunch of needle leaf java fern to elevate them. Worked really well since the javas didn't need substrate but the crypts did. Couldn't see the pots at all against my black tank background.





To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
- Next meeting Monday, Oct 13, 2014 @ 7:15pm- See ya there!

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
lauraleellbp is offline  
post #6 of 8 (permalink) Old 07-13-2014, 09:29 PM
Newbie
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Florida
Posts: 4
I came across these sand banks and am thinking of trying them myself when I set up my 55 gallon rainbowfish tank:

http://www.drsfostersmith.com/produc...9&pcatid=19749
goldengirl is offline  
post #7 of 8 (permalink) Old 07-13-2014, 10:03 PM
Algae Grower
 
PTrader: (21/100%)
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Tilden, NE
Posts: 82
I have seen small pots that are held to the back glass by suction cup, I think that they were sold on TPT forum.
Farmboy is offline  
post #8 of 8 (permalink) Old 07-20-2014, 08:56 AM
Algae Grower
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: earth
Posts: 13
Plant it high

Quote:
Originally Posted by Diana View Post
If you make a rock wall or hill you can build in pockets for the plant roots.

Grow taller plants. Then, even if they are in the substrate they will fill the middle and upper areas.

Tie other things on driftwood:
Java Fern (several varieties with wider or narrower leaves, and different shaped leaves.)
Bolbitis (A fern that looks more like a fern that Java Fern)
Anubias (Many varieties, leaves are very small to very large, and some different shapes)

Use magnets or suction cups to attach pots to the sides of the tank.
I've had success with Anubias Nana which can take moderate light which can actually grow quite big with exposed roots. The problem with Java Fern is the LOVE low light so are not well suited fro being near a bright light. The will take a while to get sick but they will. I moved mine from a 6700K flourescent moderate to high lit tank to a moderate to low LED lit tank and they went from near death to a bright green with exuberant growth. Bulbed plants also store nutrients in their bulbs and use the roots to maintain position in the current so the will anchor easier and prefer not being buried which tends to rot their bulb away. I lost severl such plant to to the moron at thr LFS telling me otherwise before I educated myself he was wrong. Do trust your LFS. They are often wrong. Bacopa would be a good choice if using a basket since it is a smaller amphibious plants and thus would be very efficient are removing waste when only partially under water.
toriless is offline  
Reply

Tags
None

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Planted Tank Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome