Scrub Oak - The Planted Tank Forum
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 5 (permalink) Old 03-24-2014, 04:57 PM Thread Starter
Newbie
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Northern Arizona
Posts: 2
Scrub Oak

Hello,

Has anyone used scrub oak in a tank before? I have some small branches I was thinking about using in a future tank but I was not sure how they impact water quality.

Given that my aquarium water does not change in pH at all from the tap, I will waterlog them in a 5 gallon bucket over time and see if the pH, or anything for that matter, changes at all.

If anyone has any experience they can share that would be great!
Sean C is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 5 (permalink) Old 07-16-2016, 06:30 AM
Newbie
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 3
I just put some weather worn scrub oak branches in my 10 gallon. How did it turn out for you?
snowbanked is offline  
post #3 of 5 (permalink) Old 07-16-2016, 02:20 PM
Planted Tank Guru
 
PlantedRich's Avatar
 
PTrader: (2/100%)
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 12,121
I'm not certain of what you describe as scrub oak as that varies place to place but in general I find oak is fine. It dries well, given time, and leaves a really hard wood without tannin.
But I might throw out that drying is not a quick easy process and takes lots of time. I let nature take care of the time and weathering and do not use any wood that still has bark on it as the layer just under the bark is where much of the sap/tannin is found.
Rather than fight the long hard battle with tannin, I look for wood that is already totally dry.
PlantedRich is offline  
 
post #4 of 5 (permalink) Old 07-17-2016, 08:53 PM
Algae Grower
 
TheGreenWizard's Avatar
 
PTrader: (2/100%)
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: New York City
Posts: 103
Hey Sean C,

I see you're from Arizona - scrub oak is the common name and can refer to 4 or 5 different species in your area. Regardless, what PlantedRich said is correct - oak is a great hard wood with little to no tannins, especially when there isn't any bark on it. However, it does need a LONG drying period. I have a slab of white oak (Quercus alba) recently cut from a log (as per a forestry-lumber mill field trip) and it will take about 9-10 months for this to dry out completely in the open air. Now, I could do a kiln, but that would still take 2 months tops, to dry it out.

"Personally, I would be delighted if there was a life after death, especially if it permitted me to continue to learn about this world and others, if it gave me a chance to discover how history turns out." ~Carl Sagan, Cosmos

"I can't tell you how many people say they were turned off from science because of a science teacher that completely sucked out all the inspiration and enthusiasm they had for the course." ~Neil deGrasse Tyson.
TheGreenWizard is offline  
post #5 of 5 (permalink) Old 07-17-2016, 09:59 PM
Planted Tank Guru
 
PlantedRich's Avatar
 
PTrader: (2/100%)
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 12,121
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheGreenWizard View Post
Hey Sean C,

I see you're from Arizona - scrub oak is the common name and can refer to 4 or 5 different species in your area. Regardless, what PlantedRich said is correct - oak is a great hard wood with little to no tannins, especially when there isn't any bark on it. However, it does need a LONG drying period. I have a slab of white oak (Quercus alba) recently cut from a log (as per a forestry-lumber mill field trip) and it will take about 9-10 months for this to dry out completely in the open air. Now, I could do a kiln, but that would still take 2 months tops, to dry it out.
I feel this is often overlooked by many who don't deal with wood very much. Time is about the only way I know for wood to dry. And it does takes years for it to dry completely if it is very thick at all. A piece that is 1/2" thick may dry in 8-10 months but a 4 inch thick one may take years!
There is the big difference in kiln dried to lumber use standards and totally dry. When picking up lumber at the store it is still "green" and will likely still have tannin in it.
To get wood like oak that is really dry, I find it has to be up off the ground so that weather can work on all sides of it without bugs, fungus, etc. eating it up.
I can find that wood in places we often overlook. Washes where wood gets washed down and hangs up in trees, etc. is one spot to look. Washed up on the beach in storms is another. Places often missed are the piles of wood left after bulldozers have cleared land or tipped over trees in fields that have been laying out exposed for years.
I find there are two ways to deal with the question of getting wood that works in my tank. I can pick at random and fight the tannin fight for months or I can pick more carefully and let nature do the work.
I'm for not working when I can get by with it!!!
PlantedRich is offline  
Reply

Tags
None

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Planted Tank Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome