How much co2 does a 2 liter DIY system put out? - The Planted Tank Forum
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 14 (permalink) Old 02-06-2014, 09:54 PM Thread Starter
Algae Grower
 
Sarahk's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 26
How much co2 does a 2 liter DIY system put out?

This may be a stupid question.
But I must know.
And what recipe what you recommend, I have seen a billon and a half different recipes.
How would you even begin to determine how much co2 is going into the tank.
Any information will help.
Sarahk is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 14 (permalink) Old 02-06-2014, 10:05 PM
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
Aqualady's Avatar
 
PTrader: (2/100%)
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Tulsa, Oklahoma
Posts: 820
Hello Sarah....I use DIY Co2...no "real" way to measure it.....you can count your bubbles in the bubble counter and get a guesstimate of bubbles per second....
Aqualady is offline  
post #3 of 14 (permalink) Old 02-07-2014, 01:40 AM
Moderator
 
Darkblade48's Avatar
 
PTrader: (3/100%)
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Toronto/Singapore
Posts: 11,630
As mentioned, it is difficult to determine how much CO2 is actually being produced by the yeast.

You can estimate the rate with a bubble counter, or better yet, estimate the amount that is actually being dissolved into your water column by using a drop checker with a 4 dkH reference solution.

Anthony


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
and
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Eheim Pimp #362 - Eheim 2213 x2, Eheim 2028, Eheim 2217, Eheim surface skimmer and Eheim autofeeder.
Victor Pimp #33 - HPT272-125-350-4M
Darkblade48 is offline  
 
post #4 of 14 (permalink) Old 02-07-2014, 07:15 AM
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: London, England
Posts: 312
2 cups of sugar, half teaspoon of any yeast, tiny bit of baking soda. Mix the sugar in with warm water nearly to the top about 4/5ths full, then add the yeast and baking soda, make sure you keep it warm or it will slowdown or stop.
AshNeon93 is offline  
post #5 of 14 (permalink) Old 02-07-2014, 08:02 AM
Banned
 
PTrader: (15/100%)
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 3,261
The reactions are temperature dependent; the higher the temperature, the more the CO2 is produced. If you want to control the exact gas rate, you'll need to control the temperature. Good luck doing this!

Other than that, DIY yeast CO2 is something you just figure on your own since the kind of yeast varies in their temperature tolerance (Fleishman's yeast does poorly at room temperature or below), as well as the requirements for your tank.
Solcielo lawrencia is offline  
post #6 of 14 (permalink) Old 02-07-2014, 12:32 PM
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
PTrader: (8/100%)
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Twin lake, MI
Posts: 789
I'm running DIY yeast on my 40b despite the fact that many will tell you its not feasible. I get plenty of results with my plants.

Some things I've learned:

The type of diffuser makes a HUGE difference. I tried glass, air stones, and HOB filter. When I switched to a canister I also installed an Ista maxmix reactor. Best way to go out of the things I've tried. You can produce as little or as much CO2 as you want but unless its actually reacting with the water it's not going to do squat. Bubbles floating to the service are mostly being wasted.

Do REGULAR solution changes. I got lazy about this and ran into a BBA outbreak that I am finally getting cleared up after some weeks. For me (40g) I have 3 2liters, each needs a 1 way valve so the bottles are not feeding into each other. I change 1 per week so each goes for 3 weeks and they are still bubbling when I change.

The mix: I found to work for me is 2 cups sugar and 1/8tsp yeast. This is a little more yeast than most recommend but I found I get a lot more C02 this way and it doesn't fizzle out within my change periods. -I don't bother with baking soda, I don't personally feel it is necessary if you keep on your regular changes.

From the articles and posts I've read there are some things you want to do. I mix my sugar and hot water and then let it cool down for quite a while. Adding yeast to really hot water can kill it and will affect your results. While that is cooling I measure out my yeast into a small cup with a pinch of sugar and small amount of warm water. I swirl it up and let it sit so the yeast has time in the open air to "wake up". When the 2 liter has cooled down I dump in the yeast and will generally leave the 2 liter uncapped for a little bit also before putting it back in line with my setup. The yeast WILL do better if you give it that time to come alive in the open air.

As for temps, right now my house (MI winter) is kept at 68f while we are home and 65 at night and during the day...my yeast bottles are working fine for me but a warmer temp would probably yield more.

You really have to experiment and see what works for you. Once you get past the setup and making sure there are no leaks, the tweaking is on you since your conditions are not going to be exactly the same.

Last edited by TekWarren; 02-07-2014 at 04:14 PM. Reason: correction
TekWarren is offline  
post #7 of 14 (permalink) Old 02-07-2014, 12:58 PM
Wannabe Guru
 
ipkiss's Avatar
 
PTrader: (4/100%)
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: FL
Posts: 1,284
Tekwarren and others,

what great input! I wish I saw some of these when I used to do yeast. I swore my stuff were just barely clinging to life. I didn't know Fleischmann's was bad at room temperature and I never knew about giving my yeast open air time. Perhaps you guys could also recommend types of yeast too?
ipkiss is offline  
post #8 of 14 (permalink) Old 02-07-2014, 01:16 PM
Planted Member
 
darthmilmo's Avatar
 
PTrader: (4/100%)
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: San Antonio, TX, USA
Posts: 180
Tek mentions a lot of good things you can do. I wanted to chip in with a couple things I learned:

1- Brewing yeast (or yeast to ferment wine) is the best ad it last longer and is more tolerant to temperature change.

2. More smaller bottles connected to a bubble counter is the way to go. I have six 1 litter bottles connected to a bubble counter (smaller bottle, which also works as a safety so none of the fermented wine makes it to the aquarium). I change 2 bottles every week. This feeds my 45G and it has been giving me great results.

3. The reactor is the key to dissolve the CO2. I pass mine through the canister intake and it makes it's way out in disolve state.

Here's the recipe I make. My latest setup is in the last reply to that thread: https://www.plantedtank.net/forums/sh...d.php?t=290122
darthmilmo is offline  
post #9 of 14 (permalink) Old 02-07-2014, 01:18 PM
Algae Grower
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Virginia
Posts: 32
I use this trick to control the temp:

1) Place DIY CO2 inside an empty bucket
2) Place a water heater (I had an extra), set to 78 degrees
3) Fill water enough to cover the water heater
4) Cover the top with something to prevent evaporation

Now you have a temp controlled environment for your yeast!
elfofelm is offline  
post #10 of 14 (permalink) Old 02-07-2014, 01:31 PM
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
PTrader: (8/100%)
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Twin lake, MI
Posts: 789
I will say that I have never seen a steady bubbling in my bubble counter (a small plastic pop bottle...one of those smaller than a 20oz) but I get regular spirts of bubbles and my Ista reactor is always full of swirling C02 bubbles. I'm wondering if my cheap 1 way valves are to hard for the DIY CO2 to push through. At some point I need to look into some better quality valves. It should be noted that these should be replaced periodically as well as trace amounts of the sugar/yeast water may gum them up which could lead them being stuck opened or closed.

Last edited by TekWarren; 02-07-2014 at 04:15 PM. Reason: correction
TekWarren is offline  
post #11 of 14 (permalink) Old 02-07-2014, 09:19 PM
Planted Member
 
darthmilmo's Avatar
 
PTrader: (4/100%)
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: San Antonio, TX, USA
Posts: 180
Genius Elf! I just left Petsmart. They have a sale of Topfin submergible heaters. Time to make my own stable thermal diy co2 ... excelent tip. . Thanks
darthmilmo is offline  
post #12 of 14 (permalink) Old 02-08-2014, 02:26 AM
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
PTrader: (8/100%)
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Twin lake, MI
Posts: 789
I really don't think the heated bucket is necessary unless your house is very very cold and even then maybe a last resort. I keep my place cooler than most and I've never needed to heat my yeast bottles. I don't think you need to start out this way, it's extra work and power consumption.
TekWarren is offline  
post #13 of 14 (permalink) Old 02-08-2014, 07:53 AM
Banned
 
PTrader: (15/100%)
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 3,261
Quote:
Originally Posted by TekWarren View Post
I really don't think the heated bucket is necessary unless your house is very very cold and even then maybe a last resort. I keep my place cooler than most and I've never needed to heat my yeast bottles. I don't think you need to start out this way, it's extra work and power consumption.
In the winter, my house gets down into the high 50s. Barely any chemical reactions occur at this temperature. It really depends on the specific conditions of the person's home, time of year, etc.

The other space-saving solution is to simply put the bottle inside the aquarium. This drastically reduces the amount of air tubing needed to pipe the gas to the diffusion method. Putting the bottle in the tank is also a great way to hatch brine shrimp.
Solcielo lawrencia is offline  
post #14 of 14 (permalink) Old 02-08-2014, 06:43 PM
Planted Tank Guru
 
DarkCobra's Avatar
 
PTrader: (5/100%)
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Baton Rouge, LA
Posts: 3,350
The production rate is controlled by both temperature and the amount of yeast you add. Add twice as much yeast, it produces twice as fast.

The production time is controlled by both rate and the amount of sugar you add. Production starts to slow when sugar starts to run out, or alcohol (the byproduct) rises to the level where it's toxic to yeast. Whichever comes first. If it starts slowing down and the solution tastes more than slightly sweet, you've added too much sugar. Reduce sugar. Or use more water (and probably a bigger bottle), which will keep the alcohol more diluted.

Simply really. Mix up one batch. Use a drop checker to determine what CO2 level it produces in your aquarium, and for how long. Then use the rules above to modify your recipe as needed.

My base recipe:

1.5 cups sugar
1 tsp. Fleishmann's Active Dry Yeast
2L bottle filled to the bottom of the neck with water

Which I know from experience produces 30ppm in my 10G for about two weeks. Your results may differ, and that's where the drop checker comes in.

But if I want to add 30ppm CO2 to a 5G, I know I'll be fairly close if I cut the yeast in half.

And for a 20G, I double the yeast. Which doubles production rate, and cuts production time to one week; so if I want two weeks as well, I also double the sugar and water (bottle size).
DarkCobra is offline  
Reply

Tags
None

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Planted Tank Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome