I know I'm gonna get mixed opinions on this.. - The Planted Tank Forum
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post #1 of 19 (permalink) Old 02-03-2014, 09:34 PM Thread Starter
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I know I'm gonna get mixed opinions on this..

I'm thinking of adding Duck Weed to my planted tank.. I keep reading it will help keep algae under control, which I'm having trouble with. I also like the idea of how it will help keep my tank clean because of it's fast growth.
On the other hand, I read that it grows to fast and is messy and a major pain to get rid of if I change my mind.
I would really appreciate opinions on if it would be a mistake adding it to my planted tank.
I have a HOB filter with a sponge filter over the down tube.

I got net full of the duck weed for free at my LFS, and it's sitting in a bowl right now, till I can decide if I want to use it or not. Thanks in advance for your thoughts on this!

Here's a pic of my tank..Just because
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post #2 of 19 (permalink) Old 02-03-2014, 09:43 PM
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I'll abstain from the duckweed wars, but your tank is gorgeous.
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post #3 of 19 (permalink) Old 02-03-2014, 09:47 PM
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Personally, I'd vote against the duckweed in favor of a larger, more managable floater--but it's really gonna' come down to what trade offs you want to deal with.

Upside: it's pretty stuff, grows faster than fast under the right conditions and, hey, free right?

Downside: grows faster than fast, tiny leaves stick to everything when you're working in the tank (including cementing themselves to the side of the tank as dry leaves if/when water levels drop), also so small and light that filters with a heavy downward force may well drive them down below the surface to tangle in your other plants and clog up your sponge filter, next to impossible to eradicate given the tiny size of the leaf and ability to regenerate from incredibly small bits.
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post #4 of 19 (permalink) Old 02-03-2014, 09:49 PM
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I'm partial to something like frogbit - it's a lot easier to remove if you don't like it.

Anyways, I usually end up with duckweed in a tank after I get plants from somewhere, and so far it hasn't been a big issue for me.

I tend to ignore it until it starts to cover the tank, and then I'll just use something (small bowl/cup) to skim the surface water off (and the duckweed with it). I've found this method to work really well, especially for removing duckweed behind filters, tubes, cords, etc.

A couple partial water changes using this method will get rid of ~90% or so, and then over the next week I just do a couple occaisional skimmings whenever I see any, and to try and draw out any hiding behind/around objects/plants.

I didn't really find it that difficult to remove - one big effort initially when I do a water change, and then a few minutes a day for the rest of the week, and that seemed to be about it for me.
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post #5 of 19 (permalink) Old 02-03-2014, 09:58 PM
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I have duckweed and don't mind it too much, but my floater of choice is pennywort - it grows fast to control algae but is much easier to remove the excess. And it doesn't clog filter intake tubes.

2 2.5s, 3 10s, 2 20s, 1 29. Low light, low tech. Ponds
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post #6 of 19 (permalink) Old 02-03-2014, 10:25 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrh View Post
I'll abstain from the duckweed wars, but your tank is gorgeous.
Thanks! I appreciate the compliment!
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post #7 of 19 (permalink) Old 02-03-2014, 10:48 PM
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The duckweed will usually cover your tank eventually, except for where the current pushes it. It is a great addition to tanks where there is something that will eat it, which could be a lot of things. I have an apple snail in a 5.5 and the duckweed stays around but rarely fully covers the top. I have it in my 55 gallon and it does not get a chance to take over because the fast current seems to stop it. Still water seems to help it grow, but interestingly, it seems to spread slower although it will get there eventually in completely still environments.

I learned to accept duckweed as it always seemed to appear somehow. I just try to keep something that will eat it. I scoop up nets full ever week from all my tanks during the water changes and put it in the pond. Goldfish take care of it.
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post #8 of 19 (permalink) Old 02-03-2014, 11:05 PM
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Don't know how it's spelled but Salvania is larger and much more manageable.
So is Giant Duckweed. I read that Water Hyacinth and Giant Duckweed are the only two plants that take out ammonia AND nitrates AT THE SAME TIME. All other start with the ammonia and only after it's used up will they do the nitrates.

The shortest distance between any two points is a straight line...in the opposite direction...
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post #9 of 19 (permalink) Old 02-03-2014, 11:10 PM
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For some reason, duckweed does not thrive in our tanks, under a variety of conditions.
The water lettuce I introduced this year indoors is another story.
It multiplies crazy-stupid like.
When I complain about it's rapid growth while scaping, Darkcobra tells me to just be glad it's not the duckweed
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post #10 of 19 (permalink) Old 02-03-2014, 11:22 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks everyone for sharing your opinions and experiences with Duckweed. I'm still not sure if I should add it or not. I guess it maybe a try it and see if I regret it kind of thing..
Has anyone noticed a decline in algae since adding duckweed to there tank?
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post #11 of 19 (permalink) Old 02-04-2014, 12:23 AM
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I recently added duckweed to my 10g. The problem I had was the hob filter was pushing it down into the water then it was clothing my intake... So I rigged up a temporary solution with a plastic cup with the bottom cut out of it to go where the water flows from the filter. Right now it's balanced on a rock but I've read somewhere that people used feeding rings to do the same thing. Here's a PIC to explain what I did.
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post #12 of 19 (permalink) Old 02-04-2014, 12:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raymond S. View Post
I read that Water Hyacinth and Giant Duckweed are the only two plants that take out ammonia AND nitrates AT THE SAME TIME. All other start with the ammonia and only after it's used up will they do the nitrates.
Hmm. The way that's emphasized, it sounds as if you consider it a good thing, but if your info was correct then I'd actually consider that bad. Because if something is wrong and ammonia is accumulating, especially enough that it registers on a test, then you would want plants to start with the ammonia!

But under normal conditions, ammonia tests zero. It's continuously being produced and is available in some limited amount, just being consumed at the same rate, so it doesn't accumulate. All plants use a combination of ammonia and nitrate under these circumstances, not just Hyacinth and The Giant Duck. If any plant were to totally spurn nitrate because some insufficient pittance of ammonia was around, it would be in serious trouble.

Quote:
Originally Posted by annyann View Post
Has anyone noticed a decline in algae since adding duckweed to there tank?
It will help if the algae is because of too much light, because it blocks light. It will also help if you don't have enough plant growth in your tank to accomplish whatever mystical thing plants do to suppress algae, since duckweed grows fast. Of course, you could instead just reduce light, or add other types of plants; but you might choose duckweed over that simply because you like duckweed! (And don't mind removing excess regularly, or that it may take some work to completely get rid of if you change your mind later.)
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post #13 of 19 (permalink) Old 02-04-2014, 12:29 AM
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I prefer riccia myself. Much easier to maintain than duckweed. Pretty cool looks plant too! Duckweed is a pain to get rid of & can take over extremely quick.


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post #14 of 19 (permalink) Old 02-04-2014, 12:57 AM
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Send a message via AIM to adavisus
Salvinia minima is a picturesque alternative to duckweed

Duckweed can be a bit tricky to control, thin out, when it gets into ponds or aquariums where you really really don't want other things smothered
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post #15 of 19 (permalink) Old 02-04-2014, 05:11 PM
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Nice tank. I sent you a message, I'll give you some frogbit, it's a lot better than duckweed.
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