Nutrient Reaction Equations - The Planted Tank Forum
 
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post #1 of 6 (permalink) Old 11-04-2006, 03:28 PM Thread Starter
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Nutrient Reaction Equations

Is there anyone out there that has the majority of reaction equations for the nutrients used in plants? I'm looking for more specific organic/inorganic reactions used in plants. I've seen plenty of vauge references to what each nutrient does and how it affects the plant. Has anyone found a list of reactions and where they take place/what they do for the plant? I'm trying to compile a list so that I might better wrap my mind around plant biology without becoming a botanist.

In other words, since potassium acts as a catalyst in much of the enzyme reactions, I'm assuming that's why a potassium deficiency leads to decreased assimilation of the other nutrients...especially CO2 since it aids the reaction for opening/closing of stomates.

Maybe this is beyond a casual forum thread, but I thought there are enough people here with enough input that perhaps this would be a benefit to others as well.


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post #2 of 6 (permalink) Old 11-04-2006, 05:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Lycosa View Post
Is there anyone out there that has the majority of reaction equations for the nutrients used in plants? I'm looking for more specific organic/inorganic reactions used in plants. I've seen plenty of vauge references to what each nutrient does and how it affects the plant. Has anyone found a list of reactions and where they take place/what they do for the plant? I'm trying to compile a list so that I might better wrap my mind around plant biology without becoming a botanist.

In other words, since potassium acts as a catalyst in much of the enzyme reactions, I'm assuming that's why a potassium deficiency leads to decreased assimilation of the other nutrients...especially CO2 since it aids the reaction for opening/closing of stomates.

Maybe this is beyond a casual forum thread, but I thought there are enough people here with enough input that perhaps this would be a benefit to others as well.
Do you realize that plants make perhaps millions of compounds?
I'd suggest in answer to your query:

Bob Buchanan, Wilhem Gruissem and Russell Jones: Biochemistry & Molecular Biology of Plants

Regards,
Tom Barr




Regards,
Tom Barr
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post #3 of 6 (permalink) Old 11-05-2006, 03:09 AM Thread Starter
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Actually, I have that book on order as well as a few others...(Hoorah for E-Bay and cheap used textbooks). I do realize that the question I posed has a million variables, but my main purpose is to get a better understanding of the nutrient relationship, especially as to how a deficiency in one nutrient can be the limiting growth factor in the presence of adequate amounts of others. Although it seems self-evident, the more I learn regarding this, the more questions I have.

Although the EI method is definately an excellent way of ensuring adequate nutrient availablilty, it leaves me with too many questions. It is seemingly impossible to state a given ppm for any nutrient without considering the nutrient assimilation by species and/or plant mass in a given water volume. Yet, I'm also beginning to understand that the variables for even the most stringent laboratory conditions would be enormous...hence, the EI method is an excellent resource for anyone wishing to maintain a planted tank without a degree in biochemistry.

My quest, then, is to understand the next level of cause and effect. To say that a deficiency in one nutrient causes yellowing leaves is not enough.
I would like to know why? Take photosynthesis for example: (6)H2O + (6)CO2 -------> C6H12O6 + (6)O2. The role of CO2 in photosynthesis is plainly evident as shown above in the equation. The steps necessary to convert water and carbon dioxide to glucose and oxygen are extremely complex. To study the anatomy and physiology of plants and the associated chemical reactions at each level would require much more than time than I can devote. To understand the general conditions at which photosynthesis takes place is not difficult to understand. I'm looking for that next level. Not just that the leaves turn yellow, but why.


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Last edited by Lycosa; 11-05-2006 at 06:16 AM. Reason: sugar and oxygen...not sugar and water
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post #4 of 6 (permalink) Old 11-05-2006, 05:12 AM
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One of my biology books has some info about what you are asking about. Amazon.com: Biology (7th Edition): Books: Neil A. Campbell,Jane B. Reece

Here's another one that may be helpful. It's Water Quality in Ponds for Aquaculture by Boyd. Amazon.com: Water Quality in Ponds for Aquaculture: Books: Claude E. Boyd
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post #5 of 6 (permalink) Old 11-05-2006, 06:27 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks Left C for the information. I have several biology books as well and several more on the way. I think that maybe I was a bit too presumtuous in assuming that this would make a good thread! I think it will require much study on my part to be able to peice it all together. I was hoping for enough answers that I could end up filling in the blanks with my own research. The problem that I'm having is that some of the papers and textbooks I've read require a much more thorough understanding of chemistry than my 'Intro to Inorganic Chemistry' class I took 10 years ago has provided. Oh well, I enjoy the research anyway!


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post #6 of 6 (permalink) Old 11-05-2006, 06:52 AM
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Originally Posted by Lycosa View Post
Actually, I have that book on order as well as a few others...(Hoorah for E-Bay and cheap used textbooks). I do realize that the question I posed has a million variables, but my main purpose is to get a better understanding of the nutrient relationship, especially as to how a deficiency in one nutrient can be the limiting growth factor in the presence of adequate amounts of others. Although it seems self-evident, the more I learn regarding this, the more questions I have.

Although the EI method is definately an excellent way of ensuring adequate nutrient availablilty, it leaves me with too many questions. It is seemingly impossible to state a given ppm for any nutrient without considering the nutrient assimilation by species and/or plant mass in a given water volume. Yet, I'm also beginning to understand that the variables for even the most stringent laboratory conditions would be enormous...hence, the EI method is an excellent resource for anyone wishing to maintain a planted tank without a degree in biochemistry.

My quest, then, is to understand the next level of cause and effect. To say that a deficiency in one nutrient causes yellowing leaves is not enough.
I would like to know why? Take photosynthesis for example: (6)H2O + (6)CO2 -------> C6H12O6 + (6)O2. The role of CO2 in photosynthesis is plainly evident as shown above in the equation. The steps necessary to convert water and carbon dioxide to glucose and oxygen are extremely complex. To study the anatomy and physiology of plants and the associated chemical reactions at each level would require much more than time than I can devote. To understand the general conditions at which photosynthesis takes place is not difficult to understand. I'm looking for that next level. Not just that the leaves turn yellow, but why.
Wow, that made my brain hurt........DC
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