What's the difference between 5000K, 6700K, 10000K? - The Planted Tank Forum
 
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post #1 of 8 (permalink) Old 04-13-2006, 01:29 AM Thread Starter
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What's the difference between 5000K, 6700K, 10000K?

Title pretty much sums it up. I think I am about to order a 96 watt kit from AH supply and I need to choose between a 5000K, 6700K, and 10000K. What are the differences between these? Is one better for plants?

Thanks for the help
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post #2 of 8 (permalink) Old 04-13-2006, 01:37 AM
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They will all work for plants, it is pretty much up to what you like, the 5 and 67 are more yellow and the 10 has more blue/white to it. I like more towards the 10- a 6700/10000 mix would be nice


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post #3 of 8 (permalink) Old 04-13-2006, 02:11 AM
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The difference is 1700K and 5000K respectively.
heh, i couldn't resist. :P
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post #4 of 8 (permalink) Old 04-13-2006, 11:56 AM
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--snafu you took my line.

I got the 6700's from AH, and they were good, but a bit yellow. A mix of 6700k, and 10 K make a nice light.

Walter

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post #5 of 8 (permalink) Old 04-13-2006, 01:12 PM
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sorry tazcrash69, great minds think alike!

basically, the temp ratings deal with equivalent black body emissions. the relationship between the temperature and peak wavelength is given by wien's law [wavelength(nm) = 2.898e6 (nm-K) / T (K)]. so the peak wavelength is inversely proportional to temp. for your examples, the peak wavelengths are 5000K (~580nm), 6700K (~433nm), and 10000K (~290nm). if you look at wavelength in nanometers (nm) against the visible spectrum chart, you can see the bias in color:

http://www.brother.com/europe/printe...cv/lcfig03.gif

like everyone said, 5000K is on the yellow side, 10000K is on the bluish side. also note, the surface temp of the sun is 5780K. if we are trying to emulate the sun, 5700K and 6000K is a good choice. of course, it might be a little more yellow than ppl like so i know lots of ppl who use a mix like someone mentioned.

if you are interested in finding the power distribution based on wavelength for an equivalent blackbody temp, check out plancks law of blackbody radiation.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planck%...body_radiation

you can use excel to develop an IDEAL energy distribution for a given color temp. bulbs are NOT ideal and have lots of peaks, etc ...

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post #6 of 8 (permalink) Old 04-13-2006, 01:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snafu
...like everyone said, 5000K is on the yellow side, 10000K is on the bluish side. also note, the surface temp of the sun is 5780K. if we are trying to emulate the sun, 5700K and 6000K is a good choice. of course, it might be a little more yellow than ppl like so i know lots of ppl who use a mix like someone mentioned.
I think color temperature in reference to light, comes from heating a reference "bar of iron" to a certain temperature. At cooler temperatures it emits infrared, then when warm - red. When hot enough, it will turn white and then even bluish in the liquid state.
http://www-astronomy.mps.ohio-state....o/spectra.html

But a typical "tri-phosphor" bulb will usually have three peaks of varying intensity and distribution, which all contribute to the bulbs final "color temperature" visible to the human eye. So color temperature isn't always a very good indication of spectrum. Example being the popular GE 9325K bulbs that are more pink than blue, even though they are higher in color temperature than a typical 6700K or 10,000K bulb.

One thing is for sure - a blend of bulbs is a good idea.

Also remember that the human eye is sensitive to the visible spectrum in a very different (read: inverse) way that plants are.

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post #7 of 8 (permalink) Old 04-13-2006, 02:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GulfCoastAquarian
I think color temperature in reference to light, comes from heating a reference "bar of iron" to a certain temperature. At cooler temperatures it emits infrared, then when warm - red. When hot enough, it will turn white and then even bluish in the liquid state.
http://www-astronomy.mps.ohio-state....o/spectra.html
well, the temperature of the bulb is 'supposed' to represent the thermal emission (including light) of a black body at said temperature. most physical objects are NOT black bodies. but, the heating of an iron bar or the flame on a torch is a good way to help ppl understand the phenomena. the object also emits light across the range of spectrum, not just at one frequency. at lower temps it's just emitted a lot more infrared than other wavelengths. in the example cited, the peak may be at the infrared spectrum, but it is emitting across infrared, visible, ultra-violet, etc, and planck's law of black body radiation can help characterize that for a black body at a certain temperature.
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post #8 of 8 (permalink) Old 04-13-2006, 03:41 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks guys, you've been a great help
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