What is the EI method?? - The Planted Tank Forum
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 8 (permalink) Old 08-23-2005, 05:59 PM Thread Starter
Algae Grower
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: NYC
Posts: 9
Question What is the EI method??

Hi there, Maybe I have not been here enough, but recently I have been seeing alot of people saying the EI method. What is EI Method?? I did a search, all I found is EI Method, Seems like everyone know what it is.

Thanks in advance
aoebombcat is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 8 (permalink) Old 08-23-2005, 06:22 PM
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
random_alias's Avatar
 
PTrader: (20/100%)
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: NC
Posts: 840
random_alias is offline  
post #3 of 8 (permalink) Old 08-23-2005, 06:22 PM
jgc
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
PTrader: (1/100%)
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Shiner, TX
Posts: 960
Now all I need is someone to actually explain it in small simple words so I too can become enlightened. No satire intended, I know if I read it enough times understanding will come.

Drat, beat to the post, link removed.
jgc is offline  
 
post #4 of 8 (permalink) Old 08-23-2005, 06:42 PM
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
random_alias's Avatar
 
PTrader: (20/100%)
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: NC
Posts: 840
I cut the below from a post I made before. Maybe it'll be helpful. Tom talks about there being a pretty wide range of safely overdosing, so as not to allow the possibly of their being a deficiency in any nutrient. Underdose, hurts plants and gives algae an advantage, overdose in a wide range and you don't hurt plants or induce algae, so why shoot for the bare minimum dosage and risk underdosing some nutrient and therefore limiting the uptake of some of the others when you can provide a reasonable excess and have some peace of mind and healthy plants. The water changes can reset your nutrient levels every so often. This always keeps your overdosing well in the wide, safe range and you hardly ever have to worry about there not being enough of something, or there being too much of something. Aim for the chest, not the head. Bigger target, better chance of hitting it, and you get almost identical results.

Here's the cut:

Tom's Estimative Index dosing method is based on a standard. He took fast growing plants and placed them under high light and good CO2 so that nutrient levels could be the only limiting factor. He then dosed ferts, increasing the dosages at intervals until he finally hit a point where the plants could not consume it all. That is the standard - the maximum uptake that fast growing plants under excellent environmental conditions can maintain. So what we do is take this dosage and scale it up or down to match whatever water volume we are using. It is assumed that we cannot have aquariums with much faster growing plants, better light, or better CO2 than Tom used in his initial testing. So, we cannot underdose using this method (assuming we scale his dosages to our tanks properly). We can however, and it is assumed that we will, overdose. It is assumed that minorly overdosing these ferts will not promote algae growth. To keep the overdosing within acceptable limits, we do 50% water changes. Lets say you dose for a week, but your tank has only half the volume of fast growing plants his had, or yours has weaker lighting, or your CO2 is out of whack. Not a problem. You will be putting in twice the amount of nutrients than your plants are eating, but if you do a 50% water change at the end of the week (this is not a rule, just a general guideline for starting out, it could be every 2-3 weeks, depending on your situation) then you essentially "reset" your tank.

The whole point is to avoid using test kits and having to "worry" over your hobby, thus increasing the amount of pleasure you get out of keeping your aquarium. That's why it's called "estimative". Basic dosing involves micronutrients (traces) and macronutrients through Potassium Nitrate and Mono Potassium Phosphate. You can get it straight from the horse's mouth at http://www.barrreport.com/ It works.
random_alias is offline  
post #5 of 8 (permalink) Old 08-23-2005, 09:45 PM
Planted Tank Guru
 
plantbrain's Avatar
 
PTrader: (267/100%)
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: The swamp
Posts: 13,609
Quote:
Originally Posted by jgc
Now all I need is someone to actually explain it in small simple words so I too can become enlightened. No satire intended, I know if I read it enough times understanding will come.

Drat, beat to the post, link removed.

You add enough(estimated this amount based on the plant needs over a week or daily for ferts) ferts and then do a water change weekly (or over whatever time frame you want) to remove any build up.

We already do water changes, may as well use it to stablize the nutrient levels and prevent anything from running out.

This produces a range, say dfor example: 10 to 20ppm of NO3 if you follow that routine.

Generally, we get algae and poor plant growth from too few nutrients, so we dose frequently and then do a water change to re set the tank.

Pretty simple.

The most complicated part of keeping plants for folks is really CO2 dosing.
But that can be reduced down to simple terms as well.


Regards,
Tom Barr



plantbrain is offline  
post #6 of 8 (permalink) Old 08-23-2005, 09:51 PM
Planted Tank Guru
 
plantbrain's Avatar
 
PTrader: (267/100%)
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: The swamp
Posts: 13,609
You need not worry about excess nutrients causing algae. If you look at them, they don't except with respect to NH4 and perhaps too much CO2, which kills fish if too high.

Upper limits:
NO3, +100ppm for 3 days killed 50% of the Amanio shrimp
PO4: unknown-5-10ppm caused no algae
K+: none known, +100ppmm caused no issues, same for Ca/Mg/GH up to 25
KH's at 6 or less seem to have a better influence on some plant species than high KH's
Traces: no known obseverable effect on fauna at 100mls of Flourish per 10 gallon, this is 40X the maximum need for almost any light routine.

The lower limits on the other hand are good at producing algae and other plant issues.

Regards
Tom Barr



plantbrain is offline  
post #7 of 8 (permalink) Old 08-24-2005, 12:48 AM
Guest
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 220
Does a high NO3 level (about 40ppm) have any effects on Java Ferns?
Mine started going brown and mushy.
[RK] is offline  
post #8 of 8 (permalink) Old 08-24-2005, 04:00 AM
Planted Tank Guru
 
plantbrain's Avatar
 
PTrader: (267/100%)
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: The swamp
Posts: 13,609
NO3 byitself at 40ppm? No.

Regards,
Tom Barr



plantbrain is offline  
Reply

Tags
None

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Planted Tank Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome