driftwood question - The Planted Tank Forum
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-10-2012, 01:18 PM Thread Starter
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
Razorworm's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Hawthorn Woods IL
Posts: 679
driftwood question

I found this awsome piece of drift wood on the bank of a lake nearby. It is vert weathered and worn. I think it is some type of evergreen ( pine?) . It is now soaking in bleach water. Is this type of wood sutable for an aquarium or will it quickly rot?
Razorworm is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-10-2012, 01:34 PM
Wannabe Guru
 
BBradbury's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Greeley, CO
Posts: 1,945
Preparing Driftwood for the Tank

Quote:
Originally Posted by Razorworm View Post
I found this awsome piece of drift wood on the bank of a lake nearby. It is vert weathered and worn. I think it is some type of evergreen ( pine?) . It is now soaking in bleach water. Is this type of wood sutable for an aquarium or will it quickly rot?
Hello Razor...

Bleaching driftwood wouldn't be my first choice of ways to prep driftwood. Bleach is extremely toxic to fish and the piece will soak up the chemical like a sponge.

I'd toss that piece and get another. Then, simply rinse it well with the pressure nozzle attached to your garden hose and then leave it out in the sun to dry for a couple of days. This time of year, the sun's rays will be more than enough to kill any bacteria.

While you're looking for a replacement piece, you'll need to pick up some large rocks to weigh the wood down in the tank, but that's part of the fun of aquascaping.

B

"Fear not my child, just change the tank water."
BBradbury is offline  
post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-10-2012, 02:11 PM
Planted Tank Guru
 
Kathyy's Avatar
 
PTrader: (35/100%)
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Newbury Park, CA
Posts: 4,202
Now that it has been soaking for a bit stick your fingernail in it. If it is spongy throughout, toss it. If it is a bit soft but hard underneath it is a keeper.

Most collected wood is of unknown lineage and lasts fine underwater. Do consider the waterway however. Unless the water is clean enough to eat the fish it may be high in chemical undesirables.

Bleach is very poisonous but it is also easily removed by dechlor as well as dissipates on its own quite rapidly. The reason water companies put chloramine in water now is because it lasts much longer than chlorine which is all bleach is. So don't toss the wood but next time I would just scrape or powerwash it down to the hard stuff. Put the wood into a tub with dechlor or just let it dry in the sun until the smell of bleach is gone.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

River Bank

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

MOP* Nano
Kathyy is offline  
 
post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-10-2012, 02:16 PM
Planted Tank Guru
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Contra Costa CA
Posts: 11,721
Ditto Kathyy:
Soak with dechlor then sun dry.
Diana is offline  
post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-10-2012, 03:19 PM
Planted Tank Guru
 
PlantedRich's Avatar
 
PTrader: (2/100%)
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 12,037
The hysteria about bleach is just a lack of understanding. Bleach will soak into wood but have you ever heard of something that will soak in but not dry out? Chlorine is by nature a gas which reacts very well with all organics like wood. Keeping chlorine in wood is like trying to keep fire in a cardboard box! It is going to react with the wood until one or the other is gone. The reason bleach is best is because it DOES react with oils or chemicals that the wood may have picked up. Wood that is boiled is just wood with boiled oil on it.
Cedar or any wood is safe to use most of the time but it does take some judgment and knowledge of your water to predict the result. If your water has little buffering, the wood
MAY drop your PH. If you have high PH /low buffering, this may be a bigger change than you want so you may want to watch more closely. High PH with lots of buffer, you may never seen anything change. That is almost the definition of buffer.

If it is cedar and it is truly dry and well weathered, it is quite possible you will see no change and it will not rot very quickly. I use lots of cedar in my tanks.

PlantedRich is online now  
post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-10-2012, 05:18 PM
Algae Grower
 
BreakingBread's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Mass.
Posts: 58
good information guys!
BreakingBread is offline  
post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-11-2012, 11:14 AM Thread Starter
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
Razorworm's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Hawthorn Woods IL
Posts: 679
Thank's everyone! I started soaking it over a week ago. I tested the water for cl last night. Got a 0 reading. Rinsing it today and putting it in fresh water to see if it goes soft or...whatever. It is quite buoyant so I want to see if it will become less so. Really a nice piece with a ton of character.
Razorworm is offline  
post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-11-2012, 01:00 PM
Planted Tank Guru
 
PTrader: (33/100%)
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Gone
Posts: 5,994
I think you will be fine with it.

I would get a Ceramic Drill bit and 12x12" Ceramic Floor Tile or a Pc. of Slate to use as a base. Drill a hole or two and
use a SS Screw(s) to attach. Depending on how close or high out of the substrate and if the screws might be visible. You can use silicone to glue rocks or pebbles around the screws. Or even use a small rock between the driftwood and base to create a pitch in the driftwood.

Seems like all the good driftwood I see around here, were we live, is only accessible by boat.
DogFish is offline  
post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-11-2012, 02:00 PM
Planted Tank Guru
 
PlantedRich's Avatar
 
PTrader: (2/100%)
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 12,037
Plastic zip ties are another handy way to get rocks and wood together when you don't want the fasteners showing.
In looking at the way nature piles thing in lakes and rivers, I often find rocks on top of wood with an assortment of debris mixed in so it works for me to do the same in my tanks.
In my first picture the wood is tied to the rock with zip ties but in the second, the big limestone rock "just happened" to land on top of the wood. As big and dry as those pieces were, I don't think they would have every sunk by themselves.
PlantedRich is online now  
Reply

Tags
None

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Planted Tank Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome