ADA 60p a good starter sized tank or go bigger? - The Planted Tank Forum
 
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post #1 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-17-2012, 07:26 PM Thread Starter
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ADA 60p a good starter sized tank or go bigger?

Been reading these forums pretty heavily for the past month trying trying to learn as much as I can before jumping into this hobby. At this point don't think I'm going to learn much more till I actually get my hands dirty but I'm looking for validation on tank size. The 60p (60L/17.5 gal) seems like a good size as far as space/price however does the 75p/40 gallon range make things much easier as far as maintenance/stability?

Thoughts/suggestions?

My equip list will is looking something like this:
Ada 60p or equiv
Pressurized CO2 with inline diffuser
Dual T5 HO lights
Eheim 2217
aquasoil

Scape: iwagumi of some kind

Flora - likely dwarf hairgrass and HC for foreground, still deciding on larger stuff, maybe a rotala

Fauna - otto, some combo of cardinal/green/neon/rummynose tetras, shrimp
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post #2 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-17-2012, 07:44 PM
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I am new also, bought a 10g tank 6 weeks ago, and I really wish I had gone bigger. I also read somewhere that it easier to keep a larger tank than a smaller tank, something to do with the water parameters.
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post #3 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-17-2012, 07:46 PM
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Pick the size of the tank based on what you want to do with it. Bigger is not always better. I've had 300g tanks to 1 gallon tanks. Currently a 60p is my largest tank and I am having fun with it. Do not underestimate how much time is involved with keeping a true Iwagumi looking good, even a fairly "small" tank like a 60p.


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post #4 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-17-2012, 07:50 PM
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The smaller the tank the quicker things can go wrong, most important is to make sure, no matter what size your tank is, not to over stock it. Dont over feed your fish, do water changes and test your water.
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post #5 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-17-2012, 09:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mk4Gti View Post
The smaller the tank the quicker things can go wrong, most important is to make sure, no matter what size your tank is, not to over stock it. Dont over feed your fish, do water changes and test your water.
On the other hand, the smaller the tank, the easier, and cheaper, it is to fix when things go wrong.


Also, how quickly things go wrong is usually based on stocking density. Not tank size.
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post #6 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-17-2012, 10:00 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the replies and confirming my previous findings

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich Conley View Post

Also, how quickly things go wrong is usually based on stocking density. Not tank size.
My initial plan was after getting plants established and tank cycled was to add a one species of fish at a time in small numbers - 3 ottos then ~7 tetras - for this tank I'd think this would be considered on the medium or low end as far as density?

One other question, when establishing the tank, are there recommended temporary plants that are basically there to out-compete the algae while the long term plants are still getting established or is this not advisable?
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post #7 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-17-2012, 10:08 PM
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if it were me with your choices, I would go with the 75p.

The 30x18 front panel on my 29g is about the perfect proportions, but the 75p would add much needed depth.

40g is still what I would consider small, and I've noticed schooling fish are calmer in longer tanks.

The 24" t5 fixture I was using easily filled the tank Hung from 3" all the way to 10".
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post #8 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-17-2012, 10:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seachaz View Post
My initial plan was after getting plants established and tank cycled was to add a one species of fish at a time in small numbers - 3 ottos then ~7 tetras - for this tank I'd think this would be considered on the medium or low end as far as density?

One other question, when establishing the tank, are there recommended temporary plants that are basically there to out-compete the algae while the long term plants are still getting established or is this not advisable?


your stocking is fine (assuming small tetras). Fast-growing stem plants will help with algae while other plants become established. Floaters are great, too.
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post #9 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-18-2012, 01:30 AM
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I always had a 10g, then finally went to a 30g. World of a difference. The smaller it is the more you limit yourself and the larger it is the more maintenance.

Figure what you think you'd like to do first. Draw/map it out. Then see how much space (LxW) you think you'd need.


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post #10 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-18-2012, 01:30 AM
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Also...you can always get an additional tank


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post #11 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-18-2012, 01:50 AM
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I have a 60p and love it, it is prefect for the amount odd space I have in a city apartment. I would start with A 60p, learn and gain experience, and move on from there. the 60p is perfect size and is easy to manage a good aqua scape. It isnt intimidating. it takes alot more work, plants, wood, rocks to maintain a nice looking larger tank. now that I have gotten a hang of aqua scaling and growing plants, I would love to go for a larger tank to keep more species of fish, especially the bigger species like rainbow fish, cichlids, larger cities, etc. but my apartment space does not allow.

When you ready and have the room, get a bigger tank and do something different!

Oh, and don't think about other brands of tanks, ada is the only way to go, nothing compares (and there is alot to compare here in Hong Kong).

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post #12 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-18-2012, 06:40 AM
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People seem to absolutely love the 60P and they are incredible looking tanks.

Unless you are planning to keep fish that definitely require a larger tank (and the fish that you listed would be just fine in a 60P so that won't be an issue either) then the 60-P should be a great choice.

Stands and lighting can be basically shared with the regular 20 gallon (high) tank so getting equipment is easier/cheaper (though if you go with all ADA stuff it is expensive no matter what when it comes to filters, lights, etc.).

With an iwagumi scape and a much larger tank you are going to have a fortune in ground cover plants that you either have to buy up front or wait forever for them to grow in.

I would say to go with a 60P and use the money you saved versus the larger tank to make sure that you get good equipment.

Your equipment list is already pretty good though. The ADA Aquasoil and good pressurized CO2 are both expensive but very rewarding investments.
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