any tips for growing algae-free riccia? - The Planted Tank Forum
 
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post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 11-15-2011, 07:06 PM Thread Starter
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any tips for growing algae-free riccia?

All the riccia I grow seems to get covered in hair algae (both the long tangled kind and the short hairs). Any suggestions? I have it both floating and tied down to rocks.

Is there any way to salvage the algae covered riccia I have now or is it pretty much doomed. It's not a huge mess, but there's really no way to remove the algae from each riccia strand.
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post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 11-15-2011, 08:07 PM
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You can dip the stuff you have in hydrogen peroxide to kill the algae that is in it now. When its in the tank you can spot treat any algae spots with a syringe and either Excel or hydrogen peroxide.
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post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 11-15-2011, 08:55 PM
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how big is your tank? what are your water/light/soil parameters? are you dosing ferts/co2?

typically small leaf foreground plants are the most susceptible to algea because they can't compete with the algea for nutrients. i would add a lot of fast growing stem plants and some floaters and increase lighting/co2 if possible (step on the plant gas pedal!).

in theory this would out compete the algea and suck up all the nutrients in the water column including free iron (Fe) that is proven to be a limiting factor for algal growth. i'm just a noob but i haven't had an algea problem yet. any that do manage to grow my clean up crew obliterates

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post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 11-15-2011, 09:35 PM Thread Starter
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I have a 5 gallon tank with a 26 watt warm CFL hanging about 2-3 inches above the tank running 12 hours a day. No CO2, no ferts. Substrate is just a thin layer of eco-complete.

Only plants in the tank were 6 riccia stones, 1 subwassertang stone, a couple marimo balls, and a little bit of java moss. Only live stock were about 20 cherry shrimp.

I set up the tank about 2 weeks ago. The riccia already had a little bit of algae on it before I attached to stones, but it looked different (not as hairy) and it seemed like the cherry shrimp were nibbling at it. I then left for about 10 days and came back to short hair algae on the walls and on the riccia with some long hair algae on a couple riccia stones.

Things I've done so far:
- Scrubbed the algae off the glass and did a couple water changes (probably about 75% total).
- Moved riccia stones to the bottom of a 15 gallon tall tank that has DIY CO2 (two 2L bottles that are about 10 days old, but still green on drop checker). Lighting is 48 watts of T5 HO with the fixture resting on the tank top. I have some 3 amano shrimp and 2 siamese algae eaters in this tank, and I'm hoping they'll nibble on the algae.
- I dipped 2 of the riccia stones in hydrogen peroxide solution (about 2 mL of 3% peroxide onto riccia in 200 mL of tank water) for about 30-60 seconds seconds
- Rescaped 5 gallon tank and replanted with amazon sword x2, crypt walkeri x2, some water sprite and anacharis, small short stems of rotala and ludwigia, big hunk of xmas moss. My goal is to eventually have the riccia back in the 5 gallon tank and i'll remove the water sprite and anacharis. Light changed to an 18 watt CFL hanging about 8 inches above the tank. Changing light period to 8 hours.
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post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 11-15-2011, 09:41 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thefisherman View Post
i would add a lot of fast growing stem plants and some floaters and increase lighting/co2 if possible (step on the plant gas pedal!).
Can anyone else weigh in on this? I initially decreased lighting to see if that could slow down algae growth.
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post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 11-15-2011, 10:22 PM
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In a non-CO2 tank, decreasing your lighting intensity and duration is almost always a good response to algae.

What kind of algae did you have on the glass? Hard green spot algae? If so, it's most likely that your lighting level is too high for your CO2 level (which is none LOL). If it was slimy brown algae, then that's diatom, which is common to newly set up tanks (or in my own tanks, when nitrates levels are too low).

Quote:
Originally Posted by thefisherman View Post
free iron (Fe) that is proven to be a limiting factor for algal growth
I've read about this for ocean systems (Mt. Pinatubo eruption in the 90's), but not for closed freshwater systems. Heck, a lot of folks even dose extra iron in high light tanks with the theory of it helping red plants.

Maybe Tom Barr will weigh in on that.
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post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 11-15-2011, 10:31 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by zergling View Post
What kind of algae did you have on the glass?
Based on images from here, I had fuzz algae on all the glass. I also have fuzz on the riccia and definitely had big balls of hair algae on some of the riccia.
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post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 11-16-2011, 02:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zergling View Post
In a non-CO2 tank, decreasing your lighting intensity and duration is almost always a good response to algae.

I've read about this for ocean systems (Mt. Pinatubo eruption in the 90's), but not for closed freshwater systems. Heck, a lot of folks even dose extra iron in high light tanks with the theory of it helping red plants.

Maybe Tom Barr will weigh in on that.
I kind of disagree zerg... lowering light and/or lighting duration is not a good response to algae. in fact it might stimulate it further because algea has the ability to photosynthesis at very low light levels co2 or not... but that's another discussion.

to address super's problem.. man super your tank is NOT cycled yet! 2 weeks?! that imbalance alone can jack up algea activity. plus the fact that super is not dosing ferts with no co2 only supports my theory that Fe is further fueling the algae. Eco-complete may be iron enriched substrate! without a gravel cap or lots of plants to readily absorb soluble Fe... it can be released into the water column via the soil + light. (thats why people use the dry start method to cycle tanks)

super man you gotta cycle your tank and stop using chemicals to treat objects you are going to put back in your tank... those little fauna are gonna be toast.

http://aquariumalgae.blogspot.com/

this is a link that plantbrain guru recommended. it's very informative with pictures and easy explanations... i hope you use the info well. good luck!

i have a little 7gal heavily planted i started in Oct... (i know it looks kinda jungly, i'm waiting for another month to let my plants get established before i prune)... but other than a little GSA and diatoms (that my clean up crew obliterate) i haven't had to clean my glass yet.
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post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 11-18-2011, 06:01 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by thefisherman View Post
your tank is NOT cycled yet! 2 weeks
sorry, forgot to mention that the tank is cycled. i have had a betta in it for 5 months. just moved the betta out and rescaped. kept the same filter media and substrate and did a few water changes.
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