Benefits of dosing liquid carbon along with pressurized co2 - The Planted Tank Forum
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post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-19-2020, 03:17 AM Thread Starter
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Benefits of dosing liquid carbon along with pressurized co2

I’ve recently invested in a pressurized co2 system but I still have a big bottle of liquid carbon left. Is there any benefits of dosing liquid carbon along with pressurized carbon? Or can I throw away the liquid carbon?
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post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-19-2020, 08:37 AM
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Liquid carbon (glutaraldehyde) is useful at small doses to function as an algaecide if you're experiencing excess algae growth.
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post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-06-2020, 01:22 PM
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Your tank have shrimp, right? My understanding from reading many Excel vs. shrimp posts here and elsewhere is that daily dosing of "liquid carbon" is probably not a good idea, although some do without seeing any ill effects. But most people seem to think shrimp do better without. If you already have pressurised CO2 in the tank then it wouldn't seem worth the risk for any small additional benefit. For algae control, it seems that occasional dosing of Excel at the high day 1 dose is usually ok for shrimp; it's the constant daily low level dosing that isn't so good.

There's a very good thread somewhere on here to this effect, worth searching for "Excel + shrimp" and having a read.

Maybe don't dose daily, but keep it safe ready for when algae strikes.


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post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-06-2020, 08:09 PM
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Ferns, especially Bolbitis grows very well when you add liquid carbon in addition to pressurized Co2. It will help in reducing Algae.

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post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-08-2020, 01:58 PM
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I'm a 'nay sayer'!

'Liquid Carbon' is gutaraldehyde, a chemical that is used to sterilize heat sensitive medical and dental equipment. It's sometimes used as an algaecide as it kills algae and some plants.
This may somehow make some plants grow better, but I don't see how it can be good for fish or inverts. After all EVERYTHING in the water gets into the fish through osmosis.
I won't use it.

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post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-08-2020, 06:30 PM
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I am a yaysayer when it comes to glut used properly and I know I’ll never win you over; @AbbeysDad.

Yes, glutaraldehyde is used in hospitals to sterilize equipment …because it is considered to be relatively safe to use around humans. It also has to be “activated”, by hospital staff before use, to move pH up into the 7.5-8.5 area to make it deadly to germs. This is why we say to throw out the “activator” that comes when we buy Metricide. Seachem makes sure that Excel is not “activated” in this way.

Alcohol is also used in hospitals to sterilize equipment (and some humans even drink it). They even use X-rays on humans in hospitals. Other things some of us put in our tanks that are used less safely elsewhere: Ammonium Nitrate (explosives - Beirut last week), Potassium salts (lethal executions), Hydrogen peroxide (can kill everything in our tank), Muriatic acid (same as H2O2).

These are just samplings that come to mind but, when used properly, can be beneficial. Here is a headline from today’s media “4 US deaths tied to methanol-based hand sanitizers” and, if you read it, you find that the people actually drank it in order to die. Total misuse of a product that works well as a hand sanitizer. Glut/Excel, when used properly, works fine in aquariums. The only harm that we can find is anecdotal, which is also the bulk of the safety that we can show, except that Seachem has performed better studies than hobbyists on Excel’s safety margins.

Answering the OP’s question:
Quote:
Originally Posted by richieh View Post
Is there any benefits of dosing liquid carbon along with pressurized carbon? Or can I throw away the liquid carbon?
, I would say that there is no benefit, since CO2, done correctly, should simultaneously provide all the carbon a plant needs and prevent algae via healthy plants.

However, I wouldn’t throw it out, since it can tamp down hair algae on a short term basis with a single, large, dose. If you have Metricide, it does have a shelf life. I don’t think that Excel does and I don’t know about NilocG’s Enhance.
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post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-08-2020, 10:10 PM
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Sorry - any chemical that 'used as directed' kills algae and some plants just can't be good for fish long term...and to what end purpose...so plants may grow a little faster?!?!
I suppose it's fine if your focus is aquatic gardening, but I'm a fishkeeper first and use plants for naturalization and to aid in water purification. No real need to push plants beyond very modest fertilization. :-)
Oh, and I don't use any of those other chems that you mention in any of my tanks.

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post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-08-2020, 10:15 PM
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Oh, and I don't use any of those other chems that you mention in any of my tanks.
Neither do I, except the potassium salts. Don't you add potassium to your tank?
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post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-09-2020, 01:52 AM
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Neither do I, except the potassium salts. Don't you add potassium to your tank?
Only if it's contained in the modest plant ferts that I use. I was using Seachem Flourish Comprehensive, but recently switched to Select Aquatics Rapid Grow. In both cases, very slight amounts. Some tanks require little/no ferts, while others require some/more....but then I grow out a LOT of fish and nearly all the tanks get 50%+ partial water changes twice a week.
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post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-09-2020, 03:47 PM
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I think that we just have different philosophies on fish health. I have a high tech-tank and am probably loading far more chemicals that you do (am I right that you are low-tech?), although I am much lower dosed than EI-type approaches. I have very long-lived community fish, so I don't sense the longer term concerns. I was curious about the Select Aquatics Rapid Grow and saw, on his website, that he focuses upon fertilizing as little as possible, primarily in low-tech setups, in order to minimize any possible effect upon livestock and that fits nicely with your approach. I don't think that my plants would be able to do well with that level of fertilization, though.
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post #11 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-09-2020, 05:48 PM
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I wouldn't throw a bottle of Excel away. It comes in handy to buy time if you have to troubleshoot an algae bloom. I don't normally do both though.

That said, I used Excel when it first came out and I had issues with fish getting sick when I used it as labeled. I think the 5 mL/10 gal water change dose is too high. I've tried it at the daily 1 mL/10 gal dose on low-tech tanks and gotten benefits for plants with no apparent trouble for livestock.


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