I am the only one switching to easy green? - Page 2 - The Planted Tank Forum
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post #16 of 112 (permalink) Old 05-19-2020, 06:33 PM
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Originally Posted by burr740 View Post
Yeah I get what you're saying. But...Ive seen plenty of chemists who know all about molecules but cant grow sensitive plants. Many have been on these forums. They are usually the ones with the strongest opinions. They use big words but for some reason never seem to be able to show a nice tank of their own. It's funny
Amen to this.

A predictable pattern for sure.
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post #17 of 112 (permalink) Old 05-19-2020, 06:42 PM
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Originally Posted by HerpsAndHerbs View Post
I suppose there is some room for debate about why seachem is backed by the best science, but I think if you actually look into how much real science is going into each product you will clearly see my point. Of all the brands of ferts mentioned in the thread so far, seachem is the only one with Chemistry PhD's on their pay roll and they are also the only ones with a full laboratory. After all the company is actually called seachem laboratories. They perform highly controlled studies and have 35 years worth of measurable data. Not a hill I am going to die on, but i don't think you can show me another company that puts as much scientific testing and real data behind their products (i.e. highly controlled and recorded).

I think any fertilizer will "work" in any tank, its more about the skill of the aquarist in knowing how to keep the balance. I have tried mixing the salts, I have tried seachem's line, I've tried easygreen ect... they all grow plants. My point with this thread is about where peoples priority lie? With "estimated index" (EI) as described and created by tom barr, the idea is that you estimate the amount needed and err on the side of too much but do a large (50%) water change at the end of each week to get rid of the excess.

I don't generally change water weekly in my tanks (controversial topic of course) so the estimated index method has me doing more work than all the other methods. Because powdered salts are SSOO concentrated, I find I cannot dial in the exact amount needed to dose the tanks to not have to do a water change. As hobbyists, when we use powdered salts in the small volumes we are making them up in, the standard deviation is very high. If you add a tenth of a gram more one week, or your scale rounds up a little, the amount of nutrients changes drastically requiring you to do the large water changes so you dont build up excess. Because seachem and easy green are made in such large batches, their standard deviation between batches is so small it is negligible. For that reason, i can use seachem very precisely so that I don't have excess nutrients require me to change water all the time. Similarly, the ratios of nutrients are very consistent in easy green so if I find three pumps of easy green plus one mL of seachem phosphate gives me growth without deficiencies or excess I am set and do not have to weigh and mix salts and change lots of water frequently.

Hopefully what I am trying to get across is making sense. EI is obviously the cheapest but I think you can see why it requires the most work for me. That is why my go to has been seachem for a long time, less work. I think if you look at the hobby as a whole, newbies use all in ones, guru's use either individual liquids (like seachem), or powders. I am of course speaking in generalities, but I think the cheap vs easy decision is one that plagues many long time hobbyists.

I personally have found the middle ground in Easy Green (pick any all in one) plus light supplementation as needed

Bump:

You should try it! Depending on what plants you have you will still have to supplement something but since you are already doing seachem that will be super easy to dial in!



Iron and Phosphate mess all fertilizers up. They have the opposite charge of most of the chemicals in your ferts so they act like a magnet aggregating your fertilizers and precipitating them out of solution making them unavailable for plants to use. That is why people say not to dose macros and micros together, they basically cancel each other out. Also most of the phosphate that goes into your aquarium comes from the fish food, so personally I appreciate the low phosphates.

EDTA is a surfactant. We use it in the scientific field to break up cell membranes, or keep things in solution. That is the purpose of it in easy green. The EDTA is coupled to the maganese and the iron and the other heavy metals with positive charge, to keep them in solution so they do not ruin the whole mixture. That is why they are listed together on the label. Instead of just iron and magansese, it is Iron EDTA, and Maganese EDTA ect. That is why easy green is able to mix the macros and micros, where other brands dont. You will not get edta in your EI powders, and you dont want to add it straight because it will kill a lot of things (BB).

Cory said in a video a couple years back when he released easy green that it matters what order you add things in. You have to mix the Iron and EDTA separately, the maganese and EDTA separately, mix everything else separately, and then mix them together. This very special formulation is what makes easy green easy.

Like I said, I am a career scientist and I use EDTA in my lab often (as well as potassium nitrate, and potasium phosphate ect). This is probably far too in depth for the average aquarist but if anyone is going to appreciate this kind of information, I believe they are on this forum.

All ferts will grow plants when used in balance. It is a question of cost, amount of work, and user experience
Thanks @HerpsAndHerbs


I am going to order it today. If it gives me the results of Seachem line I would be very happy !


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post #18 of 112 (permalink) Old 05-19-2020, 07:35 PM
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Originally Posted by HerpsAndHerbs View Post
Because powdered salts are SSOO concentrated, I find I cannot dial in the exact amount needed to dose the tanks to not have to do a water change. As hobbyists, when we use powdered salts in the small volumes we are making them up in, the standard deviation is very high. If you add a tenth of a gram more one week, or your scale rounds up a little, the amount of nutrients changes drastically requiring you to do the large water changes so you dont build up excess. Because seachem and easy green are made in such large batches, their standard deviation between batches is so small it is negligible. For that reason, i can use seachem very precisely so that I don't have excess nutrients require me to change water all the time. Similarly, the ratios of nutrients are very consistent in easy green so if I find three pumps of easy green plus one mL of seachem phosphate gives me growth without deficiencies or excess I am set and do not have to weigh and mix salts and change lots of water frequently.
There is no exact amount to dose a tank. It's simply not that precise of a hobby. If you add a tenth gram more in a solution, in practical application it's pretty much meaningless to the tank.

I would imagine there is more deviation between "pumps" than gram scale measurements into a solution.

For instance, if you make a 1000ml solution to dose a 50G tank to 5 ppm NO3 with a 20 ml dose, you would add 77.15 gm of KNO3. If your scale was off and you added 79 grams, your effective dose would now be 5.11 ppm NO3 per dose. Just saying 0.11 variation in a dose means absolutely nothing in the scheme of things.

And I just don't get the reference to being able to dose Seachem "precisely"? You could create a solution for any ratios/ppm's that you want to. You could make it 5.00 ppm per dose.....or 1.25 ppm per dose. Just saying dry salts has nothing to do with EI dosing. You can dose any method (PPS/PPS Pro/PMDD) making a solution from dry salts. The big advantage is being able to fine tune the mixture/ratios to meet the needs of your individual tank (and cost).


Quote:
Originally Posted by HerpsAndHerbs View Post
Iron and Phosphate mess all fertilizers up. They have the opposite charge of most of the chemicals in your ferts so they act like a magnet aggregating your fertilizers and precipitating them out of solution making them unavailable for plants to use. That is why people say not to dose macros and micros together, they basically cancel each other out.
IME, both for myself and observing other successful planted tankers, having to dose macros/micros on opposite days is pretty much a myth. Personally I've been front loading weekly macros and dosing micros daily for years. Personally I've never seen anyone have an issue dosing same day vs. alternating days.

Even Tom Barr has said as much.

Quote:
Originally Posted by HerpsAndHerbs View Post
Also most of the phosphate that goes into your aquarium comes from the fish food, so personally I appreciate the low phosphates.
This very much depends on the tank. You will find that high light tanks full of fast growing showy flowers need a considerable amount of PO4. In fact, low PO4 can be a real problem. Weak plants not at peak health are a magnet for algae. Just saying, most plants love PO4, and there is nothing to be afraid of.

But again, that very much depends on the tank. A low light tank full of slow growing easy plants will need much less of everything.


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Originally Posted by HerpsAndHerbs View Post
All ferts will grow plants when used in balance. It is a question of cost, amount of work, and user experience
This is true. But keep in mind, in the scheme of things, fert dosing is not the primary reason for the success of a planted tank. Correct light levels (in relation to goals/plants), CO2, and maintenance are equally important. A well managed well run tank can get by well on a variety of dosing schemes. But perfect dosing can't save a tank that is not well balanced in all regards.


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post #19 of 112 (permalink) Old 05-19-2020, 08:34 PM
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I am the only one switching to easy green?

Quote:
Originally Posted by HerpsAndHerbs View Post
Iron and Phosphate mess all fertilizers up. They have the opposite charge of most of the chemicals in your ferts so they act like a magnet aggregating your fertilizers and precipitating them out of solution making them unavailable for plants to use. That is why people say not to dose macros and micros together, they basically cancel each other out. Also most of the phosphate that goes into your aquarium comes from the fish food, so personally I appreciate the low phosphates.

EDTA is a surfactant. We use it in the scientific field to break up cell membranes, or keep things in solution. That is the purpose of it in easy green. The EDTA is coupled to the maganese and the iron and the other heavy metals with positive charge, to keep them in solution so they do not ruin the whole mixture. That is why they are listed together on the label. Instead of just iron and magansese, it is Iron EDTA, and Maganese EDTA ect. That is why easy green is able to mix the macros and micros, where other brands dont. You will not get edta in your EI powders, and you dont want to add it straight because it will kill a lot of things (BB).

Cory said in a video a couple years back when he released easy green that it matters what order you add things in. You have to mix the Iron and EDTA separately, the maganese and EDTA separately, mix everything else separately, and then mix them together. This very special formulation is what makes easy green easy.

Like I said, I am a career scientist and I use EDTA in my lab often (as well as potassium nitrate, and potasium phosphate ect). This is probably far too in depth for the average aquarist but if anyone is going to appreciate this kind of information, I believe they are on this forum.

All ferts will grow plants when used in balance. It is a question of cost, amount of work, and user experience
I just meant that you could use a better chelate to achieve the same results as EDTA but still be available in the typical pH that aquarist have.

I listen to Cory a lot and it seems he just chose a micro mix to use that the manufacturer had available. “what makes easy green easy is the pump action” which he mentioned in a recent video. Not to take anything back I definitely see the need for a good all in one for his target audience which is people who are newer to the hobby and just want some thing that works.....ish (could be easily improved). He could have made it better by choosing a different chelate but instead chose to sell more iron in a single bottle of EDTA iron called easy iron. Good business move but seems like there is still room for improvement.

Regarding Cory I think he is moving the hobby in a positive direction and making it easier with his videos to get people to stay in the hobby and get others into the hobby so nothing but kudos there.


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post #20 of 112 (permalink) Old 05-19-2020, 09:13 PM
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According to their instructions Thrive is half as concentrated as Easy Green. Their 1L bottle is rated for half the amount of gallons treated of Easy Green. I may have to look into mixing my own. Does anyone have any feedback on how long a mix would last? Or is there no effective expiration with a mixed solution?
To reach the same target level of Fe you will need to dose 3.4x more easy green than thrive reg. Easy Iron comes in a 2nd bottle so you will also need to buy it, which throws the AIO fert system out the window. But having finer control of iron levels might be a +.

For my low tech tank I dose Thrive at around 1/3 strength.
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post #21 of 112 (permalink) Old 05-19-2020, 10:23 PM Thread Starter
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Lots To Think About

I am disappointed to hear that scientist hobbyists have such a poor reputation on this forum. Hopefully I can help change that, although it does not seem I am off to a great start.

Instead of quoting everyone, i will just tag them otherwise this post will be far too long.

@Greggz
While I would agree there is no "exact" amount to dose a tank I am of the opinion there is a relatively fine range that if you go outside of, you will have issues. I think the correct range is highly dependent on how often you do water changes. I change water once every two or three weeks on most of my tanks and I think the fact that my schedule does not allow super consistent water changes means my range for error is that much smaller. If I were to do 50% weekly, that range would be quite large.

I completely agree that the 0.11ppm makes no difference on a regular schedule, but if you compound that error and let that 0.11ppm build for several weeks, IME you do eventually run into problems.

My point with seachem, or any large scale liquid supplier, is that their margin of error when weighing and mixing is much smaller because their scale is larger. I use graduated cylinders to measure out my liquid (seachem) which helps me ride that line of dosing without excess. In addition to the amount you would weigh out (assuming you aren't just using spoons), you also have the error in the amount of water you are dissolving it in. In short, a consistently premixed liquid simply allows me to be more precise than dry, which in turn helps me ride that line (or range).

Your point that the pump head is far less precise than either liquid or dry self mixing is well taken. So far it has worked for me, but the long term (several months +) effects are yet to be seen. The fact that the pump head variability has not caused problems is a testament to your previous point that there is no exact amount to achieve the desired results.

I suppose you are right EI can be done with any type of fertilizer, I have just only heard it in the context of dry ferts.

I think we probably just have different experiences based on how much water we are changing as well as plant load water volume ect...

I also did not believe that you couldn't mix macros and micros, but I did actually do my own tests and its a very interesting topic. if, for example, you dissolve your dry ferts directly into the aquarium and dose both on the same day, the water volume is so large aka the concentration is so low you probably will not see any precipitation. If you dissolve macros in one stock bottle and micros in another stock bottle and dose into your aquarium, the same is true: no visible precipitation. If however you try to mix your own AIO, dissolving micros and macros into the same stock bottle, you get a precipitate after ~1hr. I don't know exactly how much is lost and/or how much less effective it is, but the plants certainly cannot uptake the precipitate.

Yes, plants love phosphate. As I mentioned in a previous post a lot of times I add 1 mL of seachem PO4 depending on how much I am feeding. For that reason, I appreciate being able to control the PO4.

Lastly, I completely agree ferts do not make or break a tank and they are in a dynamic relationship with all the other elements, however, this thread was just about ferts.

@Sam the Slayer
You certainly could choose a different chelate. I have not noticed any pH swings by dosing EG. I am curious, have you?

@DaveKS
I am only saying that I am trying out easy green as a base layer and supplementing as needed. The AIO idea exclusively is already out the window. I am just using easy green to cheaply get the majority of my ferts in the water and the fine tune the rest.

I did not mean to start any arguments about what dosing method or regimen is best. After all, as many have said on this thread, there is not a "right" way to dose a tank. As the title of the thread suggests, I was just trying to see if anyone else was using AIO's to make their personal dosing regimen easier. It seems as though many of you do, or at least have tried based on the number of people referencing EG and Thrive. Curious why no one has mentioned Dustin's Grow Juice?

@burr740
I don't have time right now to do a whole tank journal thread but here is a sneak peak at some of my current projects. This is my 100G paludarium build. Its a tricky one because the dirt at the water line constantly adds organics to the water column. (trying to attach photos but it is not entirely intuitive as a forum newbie).

The little planters are an ongoing experiment of mine with dirted plant pots. I want a system for good growth that will allow me to sell root feeders to my LFS without them looking like crap in the store after a few days. Example: crypt melt

I feel like for my first thread here I should have chosen something less controversial than fert regimens, yet I find myself broaching the subject of dirted tanks...

Oh well, I have never been particularly good at making friends anyway
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post #22 of 112 (permalink) Old 05-19-2020, 11:29 PM
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This screams of a marketing post.
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post #23 of 112 (permalink) Old 05-19-2020, 11:39 PM
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I feel like for my first thread here I should have chosen something less controversial than fert regimens, yet I find myself broaching the subject of dirted tanks...

Oh well, I have never been particularly good at making friends anyway
Nice post and I would not worry about the topic at all.

A good healthy discussion is always welcome here. In the end we are all on the same side, or at least we should be.

Seeing your tank puts some of your earlier posts in context. I have no experience with that type of tank, but it looks interesting. I imagine fert demand would be very low.

Do you keep other tanks as well?

Anyway, welcome to the board and look forward to learning more about your projects. And btw, starting a journal is a great way to become involved in the community.


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post #24 of 112 (permalink) Old 05-19-2020, 11:49 PM Thread Starter
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This screams of a marketing post.
I have no affiliation, nor do I sell any fertilizer products.

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Originally Posted by Greggz View Post
Nice post and I would not worry about the topic at all.

A good healthy discussion is always welcome here. In the end we are all on the same side, or at least we should be.

Seeing your tank puts some of your earlier posts in context. I have no experience with that type of tank, but it looks interesting. I imagine fert demand would be very low.

Do you keep other tanks as well?

Anyway, welcome to the board and look forward to learning more about your projects. And btw, starting a journal is a great way to become involved in the community.
Thanks @Greggz and @Discusluv ! I too appreciate a healthy discussion and it is amazing how much you can learn from fellow hobbyists.

I do. I keep many tanks. I have been in the hobby for about 6 years now. I recently had a big move and had to break everything down and put in storage as I was couch surfing for a few months. The paludarium is now my most established tank. I have several hundreds of gallons worth of tanks back up and running but I am still working back to my former glory. My primary focus right now are the plants that sell well so I can get back to funding my hobby at a break even pace. As much as I take pride in the rare sensitive plants, they don't sell well around me. Lots of crypts, swords, lilies, java fern ect are the only money makers here. Right now my rarest species is probably fissiden nobilis. The paludarium is primarily planted with lobelia cardinalis which is a favorite of mine for its versatility. It can be back, fore, or mid ground if tended and fed properly.

I don't currently have any super demanding water column feeders except for some purple cabomba. I will start a tank journal soon, just will take time to get all the build pics and changes together.

The fert demand is not as low as you might think but I think the terrestrial dirt pulls some of it out of the water column... It has been a doozy to dial in
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post #25 of 112 (permalink) Old 05-19-2020, 11:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HerpsAndHerbs View Post
I am disappointed to hear that scientist hobbyists have such a poor reputation on this forum. Hopefully I can help change that, although it does not seem I am off to a great start.

Instead of quoting everyone, i will just tag them otherwise this post will be far too long.

@Greggz
While I would agree there is no "exact" amount to dose a tank I am of the opinion there is a relatively fine range that if you go outside of, you will have issues. I think the correct range is highly dependent on how often you do water changes. I change water once every two or three weeks on most of my tanks and I think the fact that my schedule does not allow super consistent water changes means my range for error is that much smaller. If I were to do 50% weekly, that range would be quite large.

I completely agree that the 0.11ppm makes no difference on a regular schedule, but if you compound that error and let that 0.11ppm build for several weeks, IME you do eventually run into problems.

My point with seachem, or any large scale liquid supplier, is that their margin of error when weighing and mixing is much smaller because their scale is larger. I use graduated cylinders to measure out my liquid (seachem) which helps me ride that line of dosing without excess. In addition to the amount you would weigh out (assuming you aren't just using spoons), you also have the error in the amount of water you are dissolving it in. In short, a consistently premixed liquid simply allows me to be more precise than dry, which in turn helps me ride that line (or range).

Your point that the pump head is far less precise than either liquid or dry self mixing is well taken. So far it has worked for me, but the long term (several months +) effects are yet to be seen. The fact that the pump head variability has not caused problems is a testament to your previous point that there is no exact amount to achieve the desired results.

I suppose you are right EI can be done with any type of fertilizer, I have just only heard it in the context of dry ferts.

I think we probably just have different experiences based on how much water we are changing as well as plant load water volume ect...

I also did not believe that you couldn't mix macros and micros, but I did actually do my own tests and its a very interesting topic. if, for example, you dissolve your dry ferts directly into the aquarium and dose both on the same day, the water volume is so large aka the concentration is so low you probably will not see any precipitation. If you dissolve macros in one stock bottle and micros in another stock bottle and dose into your aquarium, the same is true: no visible precipitation. If however you try to mix your own AIO, dissolving micros and macros into the same stock bottle, you get a precipitate after ~1hr. I don't know exactly how much is lost and/or how much less effective it is, but the plants certainly cannot uptake the precipitate.

Yes, plants love phosphate. As I mentioned in a previous post a lot of times I add 1 mL of seachem PO4 depending on how much I am feeding. For that reason, I appreciate being able to control the PO4.

Lastly, I completely agree ferts do not make or break a tank and they are in a dynamic relationship with all the other elements, however, this thread was just about ferts.

@Sam the Slayer
You certainly could choose a different chelate. I have not noticed any pH swings by dosing EG. I am curious, have you?

@DaveKS
I am only saying that I am trying out easy green as a base layer and supplementing as needed. The AIO idea exclusively is already out the window. I am just using easy green to cheaply get the majority of my ferts in the water and the fine tune the rest.

I did not mean to start any arguments about what dosing method or regimen is best. After all, as many have said on this thread, there is not a "right" way to dose a tank. As the title of the thread suggests, I was just trying to see if anyone else was using AIO's to make their personal dosing regimen easier. It seems as though many of you do, or at least have tried based on the number of people referencing EG and Thrive. Curious why no one has mentioned Dustin's Grow Juice?

@burr740
I don't have time right now to do a whole tank journal thread but here is a sneak peak at some of my current projects. This is my 100G paludarium build. Its a tricky one because the dirt at the water line constantly adds organics to the water column. (trying to attach photos but it is not entirely intuitive as a forum newbie).

The little planters are an ongoing experiment of mine with dirted plant pots. I want a system for good growth that will allow me to sell root feeders to my LFS without them looking like crap in the store after a few days. Example: crypt melt

I feel like for my first thread here I should have chosen something less controversial than fert regimens, yet I find myself broaching the subject of dirted tanks...

Oh well, I have never been particularly good at making friends anyway
You are very Welcome! Please dont let this topic and the opinions that followed discourage you from taking part in the forum.

For some reason the strongest opinions come out during discussions on fertilizing. They also often combust and need moderator intervention. Such an interesting dynamic--

Anyways.

Like was mentioned, start a journal and let us in on what you have going on with your tank/tanks.


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post #26 of 112 (permalink) Old 05-20-2020, 12:46 AM
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Curious why no one has mentioned Dustin's Grow Juice?
Everyone has their customer base and folks who like their product. Dustin is more involved in other places and to be honest, anyone with a high light co2 injected tank trying to grow lush colorful stems is..probably... beyond using that.

But it might work great for you. Tons of other people too idk. It doesnt look like you have or are planning a very demanding tank. Is it even going to have CO2? (may have missed that, I havent read every word here)

If you're just trying to have a nice low-tech (no co2) then just about anything with a complete range of nutrients will suffice


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post #27 of 112 (permalink) Old 05-20-2020, 02:22 AM
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I find that I like my hobbies to be different than my job. As a scientist, I don't run an aquarium like I would a normal scientific endeavor. To be honest, most of my hobby corresponds better to process engineering. Why would you expect someone to come home and spend money to do the job that they likely spend many hours a week doing already? (I haven't spent only 40 hrs a week on science since probably my 2nd year of undergrad)

Chemistry PhDs are likely more useful to Seachem to get their nutrients into a bottle, not find the best nutrients to put in the bottle.

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post #28 of 112 (permalink) Old 05-20-2020, 02:22 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by burr740 View Post
Everyone has their customer base and folks who like their product. Dustin is more involved in other places and to be honest, anyone with a high light co2 injected tank trying to grow lush colorful stems is..probably... beyond using that.

But it might work great for you. Tons of other people too idk. It doesnt look like you have or are planning a very demanding tank. Is it even going to have CO2? (may have missed that, I havent read every word here)

If you're just trying to have a nice low-tech (no co2) then just about anything with a complete range of nutrients will suffice
The paludarium by nature has to have very high surface agitation so I would be wasting my money on it in there to be honest. I have done the pressurized CO2 stem plant tank and its just too much maintenance for me. The paludarium is a display and if I pumped CO2 in there the plants would be breaching the surface in 24-48 hours... Ask me how I know lol.

In my other tanks I personally like the low and slow CO2 method as i don't have the most time for maintenance. I use a passive diffusion system instead of constant pressure. Solenoid just comes on for a short burst to fill up and upside down glass container calibrated to the right size for the given volume of water. It keeps my CO2 high enough for my taste and it lasts A LOT longer. The trick is just finding the right volume of gas to last one photoperiod

That all being said I am using the EG plus supplemented seachem regimen on all my tanks. It works the same way on the CO2 and non CO2 systems, its just a question of how much you put in. I think to an extent that is true of all fert regimens. Whether you are pumping in 30 b/s or 1 b/s they need the same ratio of nutrients. Now I am gonna get in trouble because it is true that certain plants want more of a particular nutrient than others so when you increase the rate of growth nutrient x depletes more. I get all that.

The point of the concept is that you can cover your bases with an all in one, and then dose extra of nutrient x to get the balance. Now if you have 30b/s CO2 and all H'ra of course AIO stops becoming effective and starts becoming cost prohibitive. As we have established thats not really my style and I don't think that is representative of most of the hobby.

To summarize the whole idea in a non-controversial way, I think AIO's, like easy green, are good for a lot more than just the newbies fert!
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post #29 of 112 (permalink) Old 05-20-2020, 02:57 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Bunsen Honeydew View Post
I find that I like my hobbies to be different than my job. As a scientist, I don't run an aquarium like I would a normal scientific endeavor. To be honest, most of my hobby corresponds better to process engineering. Why would you expect someone to come home and spend money to do the job that they likely spend many hours a week doing already? (I haven't spent only 40 hrs a week on science since probably my 2nd year of undergrad)

Chemistry PhDs are likely more useful to Seachem to get their nutrients into a bottle, not find the best nutrients to put in the bottle.

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I will have to think about that. I wouldn't say I approach the hobby like a scientific endeavor either. I don't think that would be very much fun lol. Personally I don't find one affects the other beyond translatable knowledge and tools. I do, however, think the somewhat obsessive compulsive need for precision that many of my colleagues and I share permeates all things; job, hobby, or otherwise. I also admire the hobby because the technical expertise and knowledge required to set up a balanced ecosystem makes every aquarist a scientist in a way.

Love your pic BTW. I actually have a beaker figurine on my bench
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post #30 of 112 (permalink) Old 05-20-2020, 03:02 AM
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Originally Posted by HerpsAndHerbs View Post
I will have to think about that. I wouldn't say I approach the hobby like a scientific endeavor either. I don't think that would be very much fun lol. Personally I don't find one affects the other beyond translatable knowledge and tools. I do, however, think the somewhat obsessive compulsive need for precision that many of my colleagues and I share permeates all things; job, hobby, or otherwise. I also admire the hobby because the technical expertise and knowledge required to set up a balanced ecosystem makes every aquarist a scientist in a way.



Love your pic BTW. I actually have a beaker figurine on my bench
Eh, I enjoy this hobby for different reasons. I wouldn't call what most folks do in the hobby real science (myself included).

My approach to the hobby is far less precise and driven by precision. I am more of the Bob Ross type that enjoys the happy accidents.

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“Science, my lad, is made up of mistakes, but they are mistakes which it is useful to make, because they lead little by little to the truth.” -Jules Verne
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