Save my fish while setting up new tank - The Planted Tank Forum
 
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post #1 of 7 (permalink) Old 04-11-2018, 08:50 PM Thread Starter
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Save my fish while setting up new tank

Hi all,

I am about to convert my existing 200L tank into a sump and setup a new nature aquarium of 275L. I have about 40 tetras / rummy nose in there and a tons of crystal Red shrimps. Plants are almost exclusively moss.

How can I keep my fish alive while setting up the new aquarium/sump?

Typically it is recommended to let the new tank settle for a few weeks before putting fish in. The new tank will have new rocks / soil but use same plants. Will have a 10x flow rate through sump.

I do not have another large tank to put them in. I will have the current external filter I can use and a 40L tank avail...Going for disaster?

If you have done this before plse share.

250L / Sump / Tetra + CRS
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post #2 of 7 (permalink) Old 04-11-2018, 09:23 PM
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Originally Posted by veryoldboy View Post
Hi all,

I am about to convert my existing 200L tank into a sump and setup a new nature aquarium of 275L. I have about 40 tetras / rummy nose in there and a tons of crystal Red shrimps. Plants are almost exclusively moss.

How can I keep my fish alive while setting up the new aquarium/sump?

Typically it is recommended to let the new tank settle for a few weeks before putting fish in. The new tank will have new rocks / soil but use same plants. Will have a 10x flow rate through sump.

I do not have another large tank to put them in. I will have the current external filter I can use and a 40L tank avail...Going for disaster?

If you have done this before plse share.

You don't cycle the tank you cycle the filter yes there is bactria in the tank but most is in the filter what is stopping you using the mature filter on the new tank? Until the sump is able to take over at least. With the same fish it would have the same bio-load so there shouldn't be much problem as long as the filter wasn't turned off for too long.
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post #3 of 7 (permalink) Old 04-11-2018, 09:58 PM
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Originally Posted by aqua360 View Post
You don't cycle the tank you cycle the filter yes there is bactria in the tank but most is in the filter...
This is not correct. Both tank and filter cycle. In an established tank, the vast majority of the beneficial bacteria is living in the tank. Moving a lot of fish like this out of a well established tank into a non-established tank can be risky business. If your established filter doesn't have enough beneficial bacteria to deal with the bio-load, which is quite likely the case considering the size of the tank it's operating on, your fish can quickly succumb to ammonia poisoning. The filter cannot immediately accommodate the increased burden being placed on it by losing what was being shared with the established tank.

@veryoldboy I wish you luck. I've not done a move like this but it can be challenging. Perhaps setup a backup filter on the 40L and cycle it with some media from your current filter and dose the tank with 4 ppm of ammonia until it converts that all within 24 hours to nitrates, leaving no ammonia or nitrites. Also, add some of the current substrate to the 40L and some/all of the plants to increase the speed at which it cycles. If you do this until the tank is cycled, then add fish and move over the primary filter as well, I think you'll have a good shot at success.
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post #4 of 7 (permalink) Old 04-12-2018, 10:40 AM
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Originally Posted by mgeorges View Post
This is not correct. Both tank and filter cycle. In an established tank, the vast majority of the beneficial bacteria is living in the tank. Moving a lot of fish like this out of a well established tank into a non-established tank can be risky business. If your established filter doesn't have enough beneficial bacteria to deal with the bio-load, which is quite likely the case considering the size of the tank it's operating on, your fish can quickly succumb to ammonia poisoning. The filter cannot immediately accommodate the increased burden being placed on it by losing what was being shared with the established tank.
I didn't say it wasn't risky and I did say there are bacteria in the tank but the filter is where most of the action happens but I have done this many times it is best if the filter still has good flow but has not recently been cleaned and obviously very regular partial water changes and tests need to be done but given there will be extra water and the same bioload he shouldn't lose any fish doing this. I would recommend daily tests and very regular water changes at least for first two weeks and then vary according to results of the tests if done right there should be no fish loss. Obviously the more established filters he has to use the easier the road would be. I would also cut down on feeding until he is happy with the test results to every two days if the fish are fed every day as this will help too and will not harm the fish.

Light has a negative effect on nitrifying bacteria and while it is in the tank most of the action takes place in the filter where there is both good flow and no light.
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post #5 of 7 (permalink) Old 04-12-2018, 12:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mgeorges View Post
Both tank and filter cycle. In an established tank, the vast majority of the beneficial bacteria is living in the tank. Moving a lot of fish like this out of a well established tank into a non-established tank can be risky business. If your established filter doesn't have enough beneficial bacteria to deal with the bio-load, which is quite likely the case considering the size of the tank it's operating on, your fish can quickly succumb to ammonia poisoning. The filter cannot immediately accommodate the increased burden being placed on it by losing what was being shared with the established tank.
Would it help jump-start the temporary tank by re-using the water from the old tank? When you remove the water so you can move the tank, can't you just put it into the temporary tank with the old filter. that way, you'd have the cycled water AND filter?
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post #6 of 7 (permalink) Old 04-12-2018, 01:13 PM
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I would consider placing the new tank in different location if possible and leave fishes and inverts alone until the new tank has been set up and allowed to run for a month minimum.
Otherwise,I would get everything needed to set up new tank and then place fishes in large Rubbermaid tub filled half way with tank water once you are ready to drain the older tank,and move filter and heater to the Rubbermaid tub while you set up the new tank which should not take more than a couple hours IF everything is ready to go.
Can remove plants from old tank if you are planning on using them in new tank and place them in another small tub.
The tubs are cheap at Walmart.
Once the new tank is set,planted,can move the fish/heater to the new tank, and place the filter on the tank and let it run with new filtration for a few weeks.
Monitor the water for ammonia and or nitrites daily and perform water changes if dictated.

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Quote:
Originally Posted by C5rider View Post
Would it help jump-start the temporary tank by re-using the water from the old tank? When you remove the water so you can move the tank, can't you just put it into the temporary tank with the old filter. that way, you'd have the cycled water AND filter?
No benefit to using old water in new tank other than maybe 50/50 mix to help prevent osmotic shock.
Good or OK to hold fishes in temporary tank with old tank water while you set the new tank for same reason.Move fishes before you pull out plants to prevent ammonia spike from disturbed organic matter in substrate.
If water changes have been consistent,regular,then water will not be much different than clean water from the tap and clean water is in my humble opinion more beneficial to fishes than old tank water.
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post #7 of 7 (permalink) Old 04-12-2018, 07:59 PM Thread Starter
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Thks guys, this is very helpful.

I think my plan is to:

transfer fish to rubbermaid tub with old external filter. Change water daily.

Setup new aquarium and sump. Add old plants to it. Cycle for 2 weeks adding Seachem's stability to help bacteria colonisation.

Transfer fish to new tank and add old filter media to sump. Do water change every 2-3 days for 1-2 week(s) adding seachem's prime every time.

...and pray for the best :-)

250L / Sump / Tetra + CRS
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