How fast can you raise the temp on your fish without shock/damage? - The Planted Tank Forum
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post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 03-18-2018, 09:39 AM Thread Starter
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How fast can you raise the temp on your fish without shock/damage?

How fast can you raise the temp on your fish without shock/damage?

When I am doing a water change, sometimes the new water I'm putting in the tank is not the same temperature as the water aquarium.

I fill up a Rubbermaid with an submersible water pump and usually a digital timer so I can turn it on for 1 minute and off for 5 minutes and make this process last a long time.

So I could for example make it 1 hour to add 20 gallons different temperature water or longer depending on how the digital timer is programmed.

My goldfish tank may be 70 degrees and tropical fish tank is about 74.5 degrees, my tap water is usually like 80 degrees in that particular room.

Thanks.
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post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 03-18-2018, 11:03 AM
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How much water are you changing?
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post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 03-19-2018, 05:25 AM Thread Starter
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How much water are you changing?
Maybe 60%
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post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 03-19-2018, 01:37 PM
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I must be missing something?! Your cold tap water is 80F! I've never lived anywhere where that was the case. Since you're using a bin anyway, why not draw the water the day (or even two) before the WWC and let it get to room temperature (72F ish), then just pump it back in without delays? This works if the water from the tap is too hot or too cold.

I pre-filter water and sometimes feel it's too cold so I use a spare heater in the bin to get it to tank temperature. If when I use sink (well) water, I use a faucet hose adapter and I have previously adjusted/tested the faucet for 76F and index the faucet position with a sharpie.

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post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 03-19-2018, 02:19 PM
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I must be missing something?! Your cold tap water is 80F! I've never lived anywhere where that was the case. Since you're using a bin anyway, why not draw the water the day (or even two) before the WWC and let it get to room temperature (72F ish), then just pump it back in without delays? This works if the water from the tap is too hot or too cold.

I pre-filter water and sometimes feel it's too cold so I use a spare heater in the bin to get it to tank temperature. If when I use sink (well) water, I use a faucet hose adapter and I have previously adjusted/tested the faucet for 76F and index the faucet position with a sharpie.

Got to agree that you have missed some of the major shock of living in different places!! Not all places are as cool as you find and not all rooms are cooled! Tap water in Central Texas is often too hot to go directly into the tanks but I do have the good fortune to have AC which will bring the temp down to more workable. Many do not have that luxury.
But the question of how much water can be changed and how fast will depend on the tank size as well as the tap water temperature. And that is likely to vary from day to day, so I'm not sure one could set up a system to do it without a person to monitor the temp.
Another method might be to use a temperature controller to monitor the temp and control the pump? A cheap controller off the auction can be found for under $15 and then made to let the timer turn the pump on at specific times but the controller turn it off when the temp reaches a preset level? Some "fiddle" will be needed to get it set and may change with the seasons if the tap temperature change?
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post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 03-19-2018, 03:51 PM
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I can only speak from my experience, but I wouldn't worry about it too much.

In my tank, I use RO water stored in the basement. It's always cool down there, and I only heat the water to 70*.

Then I do a 70% water change, and my tank temp drops from 78* to about 73* in twenty minutes (80 gallons). Have never seen a negative effect on the fish. Once in a while heaters have not been on, and water is only 65*. Then tank gets down to about 68*. Again, no issues.

My feeling is that in nature, waters temps can change quickly. Even going from the surface down about 10' can be a significant change. If you set out to kill your fish by changing the temp, I imagine it would take a crazy change to extreme temperatures to do so.
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post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 03-19-2018, 05:20 PM
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Got to agree that you have missed some of the major shock of living in different places!! Not all places are as cool as you find and not all rooms are cooled! Tap water in Central Texas is often too hot to go directly into the tanks but I do have the good fortune to have AC which will bring the temp down to more workable. Many do not have that luxury.....
So if the water outta the tap is 80~F, and there's concern, how about tossing some ice in the bin to bring the temp down?

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post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 03-19-2018, 05:52 PM
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How fast can you raise the temp on your fish without shock/damage?

I guess I will chime in. So correct me if Im wrong, Im guessing you keep your tank at around 76-78 and you have 80 degree tap water. If you do say a 50% water change you will only offset the temperature by the most of 2 degrees. Its all about averages. 76 + 80 divided by 2 = 78 and if you keep it warmer than its even less of a change. And if you wanted to have an even smaller change (wont really change any affect) you can dump a couple handfuls of ice in the water and it should get it down a degree or two [like previously mentioned]. Going off what @Greggz said, there are times in nature where the water will fluctuate 5-10 degrees in the results of a monsoon (spelling?) or heavy rain. Or lack of rain where as water levels get down and suns heat can scorch the water.

Hope this helps, Skye


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post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 03-19-2018, 06:49 PM
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I don't know the situation that the OP has but there are many places where it is not so simple as a few degrees swing in the tap water. It is hard for folks from the colder areas to think of but as you move further South, the tap water situation varies a lot more. In the North, water lines are buried deep and that leaves the temperature of the lines and the water in them to vary slowly. But in the South, the lines are not prone to freezing and they are often buried very shallow where they heat up. It is not unusual for my tap water to come in near 90! And if the lines are in older houses or where they are run in the attic spaces, it can be even hotter. Not at all hard for attics to reach 140+ when the outside air is 110? My daughter moved into her first house and called a plumber when the water began to come in too cool. After some head scratching, he had to inform her that her water heater was still on "pilot" and had never been heating the water for seven months but just being heated as it ran through the attic!
Different situations do require different methods.
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post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 03-19-2018, 06:53 PM
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I don't know the situation that the OP has but there are many places where it is not so simple as a few degrees swing in the tap water. It is hard for folks from the colder areas to think of but as you move further South, the tap water situation varies a lot more. In the North, water lines are buried deep and that leaves the temperature of the lines and the water in them to vary slowly. But in the South, the lines are not prone to freezing and they are often buried very shallow where they heat up. It is not unusual for my tap water to come in near 90! And if the lines are in older houses or where they are run in the attic spaces, it can be even hotter. Not at all hard for attics to reach 140+ when the outside air is 110? My daughter moved into her first house and called a plumber when the water began to come in too cool. After some head scratching, he had to inform her that her water heater was still on "pilot" and had never been heating the water for seven months but just being heated as it ran through the attic!
Different situations do require different methods.
Wow that is interesting. I didn't know that.

My water comes from a well, and is always the same temperature.


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post #11 of 11 (permalink) Old 03-19-2018, 07:33 PM
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Wow that is interesting. I didn't know that.

My water comes from a well, and is always the same temperature.
That's where things can get confusing. Underground is a relative term so if we call a well that is 400 feet deep underground, it will likely vary very little but if the well is only 80 feet deep it will vary much more. Having dealt with Northern Ohio winters, I know the trauma of dealing with frozen pipes but I find I have far more trouble with winter freezing here than I ever did there! There we used freeze proof faucets and it was just a no-brainer. Here the pipes may be run the length of the garage with no insulation in the wall and no heat from the house so it is a real problem to run a cover and heat lamp to the outside faucet.
Building code requires the water heater to have huge vents to the outside so that gas fumes don't collect in the garage. That works fine until it does get cold enough to freeze and your water heater and plumbing are setting nearly outside?
An apartment renter may have to sign an agreement to repair the plumbing if it freezes due to them not dripping the faucet well enough. And the water heater is set outside on the balcony!!
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