Do Thermostat chillers work for Aquariums? - The Planted Tank Forum
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post #1 of 6 (permalink) Old 02-16-2018, 05:51 AM Thread Starter
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Do Thermostat chillers work for Aquariums?

Do these work for aquariums? Does anyone here use them?

I need to lower my temperature in the summer from 79 to 75 degrees. My room ambient temperature is 75 degrees but the pumps and lights cause the aquarium to get hotter than the room. This device has no compressors like a traditional water chiller but is more than just a simple heatsink. Its a thermostat( Peltier effect) device which sometimes are used in devices to like cool a soda can or very small scale things. It does make cold but impracticable for larger operations such as air conditioning.

Does anyone know if this can lower a 75 tank by 4 degrees to ambient temperature?






https://www.amazon.com/Thermostat-Re...mostat+Chiller
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post #2 of 6 (permalink) Old 02-16-2018, 02:15 PM
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I don't think this would work at all. For a tank that large, your going to need a lot more.

First, do you really need to lower the water temp? 79 F isn't that bad. Also, can you reduce the amount of heat being added to your tank? Every pump in the tank will add some heat to the water. Lighting can also add a lot of heat. If you can cut some of these back, you may not need to do anything else.

You might be able to lower the water temp by using a screen top on the tank and having a small fan blow across the water surface. This causes the water to evaporate more, and coo the tank. It's possible to control the fan with an Inkbird controller. Get one that will handle a chiller and a heater. The down side it that evaporative cooling is limited, and also depends on the humidity in the room. Dry air works lots better.

If that doesn't work, the other alternative is a regular aquarium chiller. However for a 75 gal tank, your going to need something large. That's going to be expensive, about $750 to $1000, and be expensive to run. I'd only do this if there was no other way.
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post #3 of 6 (permalink) Old 02-17-2018, 12:45 AM
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I think the clue is in the title of the posted ad? Mini doesn't often include 75 gallon tanks. I would first try all the steps DaveK has suggested as they can do a lot.
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post #4 of 6 (permalink) Old 02-18-2018, 09:07 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PlantedRich View Post
I think the clue is in the title of the posted ad? Mini doesn't often include 75 gallon tanks. I would first try all the steps DaveK has suggested as they can do a lot.
Yeah but I am only trying to bring it down a few degrees down to room temperature, its not like its 100 degrees and I'm trying to make the aquarium 70 degrees. Seem like even a heat exchange might work.

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Originally Posted by DaveK View Post
I don't think this would work at all. For a tank that large, your going to need a lot more.

First, do you really need to lower the water temp? 79 F isn't that bad. Also, can you reduce the amount of heat being added to your tank? Every pump in the tank will add some heat to the water. Lighting can also add a lot of heat. If you can cut some of these back, you may not need to do anything else.

You might be able to lower the water temp by using a screen top on the tank and having a small fan blow across the water surface. This causes the water to evaporate more, and coo the tank. It's possible to control the fan with an Inkbird controller. Get one that will handle a chiller and a heater. The down side it that evaporative cooling is limited, and also depends on the humidity in the room. Dry air works lots better.

If that doesn't work, the other alternative is a regular aquarium chiller. However for a 75 gal tank, your going to need something large. That's going to be expensive, about $750 to $1000, and be expensive to run. I'd only do this if there was no other way.
I live in a humid environment so the evaporation would not work that well but even if it did, the idea of having all my aquarium water evaporate when I'm away will probably not be good.

I would love to have some $100 device that could cool down the water a few degrees without evaporating or causing humidity.

Thanks.

Last edited by Darkblade48; 02-19-2018 at 10:23 AM. Reason: Please use the edit function for back to back posts to keep threads cleaner
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post #5 of 6 (permalink) Old 02-18-2018, 02:17 PM
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Coolers of this sort will often have a design to remove a certain number of BTU and with this one being designed for a small amount of cooling it may not be able to make a dent in the amount needed to coo a large tank. That is all guesswork, of course without any real info on how much cooling it is expected to do. But the idea is that removing 100BTU will change a five gallon tank far more than if the same but if removed from a 75 gallon.
It is my guess that it will not do the job and I would look for other methods that may help. Sometimes the solution needs to be in a series of small changes, one of which might be adding this cooler but the point is the design of this is more likely to have started out as a way to cool a computer chip, etc. and then was adapted/marketed as a tank cooler.
It may work but then I often see things sold that do not work.
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post #6 of 6 (permalink) Old 02-18-2018, 07:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Merriallynchian View Post
... I would love to have some $100 device that could cool down the water a few degrees without evaporating or causing humidity. ...
The world would love to find such a device. The thing is that in order to cool something you need to export heat from it. A 75 gal tank contains a lot of heat. Note how water in a lake or ocean can stay warm long after the sun has gone down, and the air temp is cool.

I still recommend you try evaporative cooling first. It's in expensive and easy to set up. Just to see if you will get any results at all you can cover the tank with a screen for a few days and see if it helps. If your close then consider adding a fan or two. For DIY projects, often 12v computer fans are used.

If that doesn't work, then you 'll need to consider if an expensive chiller is worth it.
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