Very important question about plants emiting co2 after lights go off at night. please - The Planted Tank Forum
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post #1 of 7 (permalink) Old 11-10-2017, 12:03 AM Thread Starter
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Probably a dumb question but please read all and advise. I have a 6 gallon planted tank. Carpet is Monte Carlo. I dose Seachem excel as carbon source.

The other day I have a thought in mind after I was reading about detritus worms that they stick to glass when lights goes off because they look for oxygen that's why when we turn on lights we see them on glass.

I am thinking if these worms feel less oxygen then how about shrimps I have in tank? They don't feel lack of oxygen? Is it good for there health?

I have a hang on back filter which creates water agitation and hence oxygen production but is it enough? At night when lights are off plants emit co2 so wouldn't be too much co2 in water?

I was advised on a forum to put an air stone at night to have tank nicely oxygenated but here one member after seeing my water agitation video said that hang on back filters produce so much oxygen and even drive co2 out and that's why planted tanks don't mainly use hob filters and said that my hob filter is enough and adequate for my water surface movement.

My water agitation :

https://youtu.be/hNuzCCmjbC4

Please suggest me what shall I do? I have like 25 shrimps and I will be getting 20+ more soon. Don't want them to gasp for oxygen at night when lights are off.

Thanks.
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post #2 of 7 (permalink) Old 11-10-2017, 03:41 AM
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Oxygenation is a good thing and using an airstone at night to increase surface agitation and water circulation is a good way to add more O2. Since plants don't use CO2 at night then why be concerned that you're driving it off.
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post #3 of 7 (permalink) Old 11-10-2017, 08:19 AM
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Where did you read the thing about detritus worms? Because to me that sounds suspiciously like one of those explanations that someone came up with that sounded plausible enough, and people then accept it without thinking closer on it. A far more likely explanation, in my mind, is that they take the opportunity to forage in the open under the cover of darkness, as many animals do. I very much doubt that oxygen levels ever sink far enough to harm your shrimp, especially since you have surface agitation. Personally I have two small, unfiltered tanks with plants, shrimp and other inverts, no surface agitation whatsoever, and everyone seems perfectly happy in there.


If you're still worried, I just found this excellent post about oxygen in water:
https://www.plantedtank.net/forums/8-...ml#post8218249
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post #4 of 7 (permalink) Old 11-10-2017, 08:31 AM
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For whatever reason I can't edit my post. So I'm adding a comment here: Come to think of it, since substrate bacteria consume oxygen, and the water in the substrate is likely less well oxygenated than the rest, detritus worms MIGHT be coming up to breathe at night. Unless you have an extremely large and active bacterial flora, I doubt this effect extends to the water column, however.
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post #5 of 7 (permalink) Old 11-10-2017, 02:41 PM
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Low oxygen can happen and it can be very bad for animals depending on how low it goes. Unfortunately just looking at water movement doesn't tell you if you have sufficient O2. If someone tells you your tank is OK they are simply stating an opinion which may not be correct. Each tank is different. What may work for him might not work for you The only way to know for sure is to get an oxygen test kit and test the water during the day and during the night.

https://www.amazon.com/Salifert-Diss...70_&dpSrc=srch

Most people in the hobby don't buy these and I don't have one but in the past I may have had that problem but didn't recognize it at the time.

In the typical CO2 injection system the aquarium water is kept very close to the saturation limit for CO2 in water. Under this conditions more aeration will reduce CO2 levels. However in low tech tanks without CO2 injection air pumps are used to insure O2 and CO2 stay at constant levels and the more aeration you have the higher the levels. CO2 levels in a low the tank However will never be as high as in a tank with CO2 injection.

In your case you do not have a CO2 injection system. You are relying on a liquid carbon supplement. Increased aeration will not drive off the liquid carbon. So I would think in your case more aeration would not be harmful. So feel free to try it.
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post #6 of 7 (permalink) Old 11-10-2017, 03:03 PM
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If your running an HOB, worrying or getting an o2 test is a complete waste of money. Please donate the money instead to your favorite charity.
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post #7 of 7 (permalink) Old 11-10-2017, 09:45 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff5614 View Post
Oxygenation is a good thing and using an airstone at night to increase surface agitation and water circulation is a good way to add more O2. Since plants don't use CO2 at night then why be concerned that you're driving it off.
Quote:
Originally Posted by hivemindhermit View Post
Where did you read the thing about detritus worms? Because to me that sounds suspiciously like one of those explanations that someone came up with that sounded plausible enough, and people then accept it without thinking closer on it. A far more likely explanation, in my mind, is that they take the opportunity to forage in the open under the cover of darkness, as many animals do. I very much doubt that oxygen levels ever sink far enough to harm your shrimp, especially since you have surface agitation. Personally I have two small, unfiltered tanks with plants, shrimp and other inverts, no surface agitation whatsoever, and everyone seems perfectly happy in there.


If you're still worried, I just found this excellent post about oxygen in water:
https://www.plantedtank.net/forums/8-...ml#post8218249
Quote:
Originally Posted by hivemindhermit View Post
For whatever reason I can't edit my post. So I'm adding a comment here: Come to think of it, since substrate bacteria consume oxygen, and the water in the substrate is likely less well oxygenated than the rest, detritus worms MIGHT be coming up to breathe at night. Unless you have an extremely large and active bacterial flora, I doubt this effect extends to the water column, however.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Surf View Post
Low oxygen can happen and it can be very bad for animals depending on how low it goes. Unfortunately just looking at water movement doesn't tell you if you have sufficient O2. If someone tells you your tank is OK they are simply stating an opinion which may not be correct. Each tank is different. What may work for him might not work for you The only way to know for sure is to get an oxygen test kit and test the water during the day and during the night.

https://www.amazon.com/Salifert-Diss...amp;dpSrc=srch

Most people in the hobby don't buy these and I don't have one but in the past I may have had that problem but didn't recognize it at the time.

In the typical CO2 injection system the aquarium water is kept very close to the saturation limit for CO2 in water. Under this conditions more aeration will reduce CO2 levels. However in low tech tanks without CO2 injection air pumps are used to insure O2 and CO2 stay at constant levels and the more aeration you have the higher the levels. CO2 levels in a low the tank However will never be as high as in a tank with CO2 injection.

In your case you do not have a CO2 injection system. You are relying on a liquid carbon supplement. Increased aeration will not drive off the liquid carbon. So I would think in your case more aeration would not be harmful. So feel free to try it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by houseofcards View Post
If your running an HOB, worrying or getting an o2 test is a complete waste of money. Please donate the money instead to your favorite charity.
Thanks a lot guys for your valuable suggestions and for links. I might be over thinking. I will keep things as it is. Thanks.
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