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post #1 of 20 (permalink) Old 12-10-2016, 08:04 PM Thread Starter
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Combine Seachem Matrix and DeNitrate?

We have very hard public water, which is supplied from a public water well, and I have this theory, among other things being a possible cause, that high silicates might be causing a problem with brown algae blooms (diatoms) when I top off, and/or when I do water changes. Actually, the brown diatoms have been a problem for quite a while, even after doing regular water changes, cleaning the tank, etc...They just wouldn't go away, when they should have gone away if there was a decent bio filter established.

So, I very recently changed over to running two Aquaclear filters, an Aquaclear 50 and an Aquaclear 30, both of which I already have. I switched over to running those two filters from running just one Marineland Penquin filter on the tank, which only uses the bio wheel to establish a bio filter in the tank.

I'm not sure whether the brown algae is due to the shortcomings of the Penguin with respect to possibly having an inadequate bio filter, or if it's the silicates in my tap water, or if a combination of both conditions were causing the brown algae issues. But, upon several weeks of reflection, I've started to theorize that the majority of the diatom problem might be on account of the lack of a decent bio filter from the Penguin filter, and that maybe if I just clean things completely up, and switch filters, perhaps the entire issue would go away without all the rest of what I've been considering as an overall comprehensive strategy.

So, I completely cleaned every aspect of the tank and synthetic gravel, and that was only about three weeks ago. So, the bio filter is barely established yet. My readings now are all still at zero, Ammonia zero, Nitrite (.012-.015 actually), Nitrates at zero, Phosphates at Zero, etc...

My comprehensive plan was to experiment with combining Seachem De*Nitrate and Matrix, each in their own respective box filters running simultaneously in the tank, but I needed to slow the flow rate down on an Aquaclear 30 box filter so I could use Seachem De*Nitrate in that filter.

De*Nitrate requires a flow rate of less than 50 GPH in order to nourish the anaerobic bacteria. Seachem advises that anything higher than 50 GPH will starve the bacteria of nutrients, and the anaerobic bacteria will die.

Seachem recommends a canister filter for De*Nitrate to reduce the oxygen levels so that the anaerobic bacteria can colonize and flourish within the De*Nitrate media. But, I can't seem to find a canister filter anywhere that has less than a 50 GPH flow rate. Most canister filters process at much higher rates. I looked at the Eheim Classic 2211, but it processes at a rate higher than 50 GPH as well.

I do really have a lot of respect for Seachem, but why do they develop a product, then recommend that it should be used in a canister filter that doesn't exist (ie: less than a 50GPH flow rate).

So, I've decided to use the Aquaclear 30 box filter, which I already have, and to slow down the flow rate somehow in order to create the proper environment for the De*Nitrate to function properly (ie: less than 50GPH flow rate).

To do this, I am considering a sponge filter on the intake of the Aquaclear 30 to slow down the flow rate, which I figure will also provide the bio-filtering benefits of the sponge filter as well, and I'll probably have to also block up the media chamber a bit to slow the flow rate down.

Can anyone advise which of the sponge filters out there would be a good option, one that will adapt to the Aquaclear 30 that would assist in slowing the flow rate down, while still allowing some water to pass through the filter, all be it at a rate that will achieve less than a flow rate of 50 GPH? Or, if you have a different set of ideas for slowing down the flow rate on the box filter, I'm open to that too.

As I mentioned, I am also simultaneously running an Aquaclear 50 box filter on this same tank, which has Seachem Matrix media in it (no carbon), which Seachem says is primarily good for cultivating aerobic bacteria, although they imply that Matrix will supposedly also cultivate anaerobic bacteria, but only under perfect conditions, less than 50 GPH apparently(?) That's why I'm thinking that even with Matrix, if you want anaerobic bacteria, which are very beneficial in a bacterial filter, you still have to slow down the flow in order to cultivate it. I get the distinct impression from Seachem that de*Nitrate is superior for cultivating anaerobic bacteria, so that's why I'm still considering a way to run it in the Aquaclear 30, and slowing down the flow rate somehow.

I do not intend to run a sponge filter on the Aquaclear 50, which will provide sufficient flow so that slowing down the Aquaclear 30 won't effect the overall exchange of water in the tank, so that I'll still have adequate mechanical filtration even with the Aquaclear 30 slowed down. My intention is to clean the sponge filter on the Aquaclear 30 every couple of weeks to keep it open, so it won't turn into a Nitrate factory.

If you think that running De*Nitrate in the Aquaclear 30 would likely be unproductive, since I am already running Matrix in the Aquaclear 50 filter, should I still run a sponge filter to slow down the Aquaclear 30, and see how things go using just the one bag of De*Nitrate, which I already have? I figure I might as well use it somewhere rather than waste it. I had intended to fill the chamber of the Aquaclear 30 completely with De*Nitrate, but if that would just be redundant, since the Matrix is in place in the Aquaclear 50, it might just be altogether totally unnecessary. What do you think knowing that Seachem implies that De*Nitrate is best between the two for cultivating anaerobic bacteria?

If you think that Matrix is sufficient for both types of bacteria, and I just run the one bag of De*Nitrate that I already have, just so I don't waste it, rather than buying more De*Nitrate to fill up the chamber in the Aquaclear 30, then that would free up some room in the chamber of the Aquaclear 30 for other media.

I already have a supply of Phosguard, which I could use in the open chamber for a few days after top-offs, to keep the silica levels in check, then maybe use some Purigen at times, alternating Phosguard when I need it, and Purigen to reduce ammonia, nitrite, or nitrates if they get high. Do you recommend Phosguard in there for times when I top-off the tank? What about Purigen?

But, I worry that too much chemical filtration will starve the bacteria colonies that I'm trying to establish right now. So, I'm holding off for a while on chemical filtration, such as bags of Phosguard and Purigen, at least until I know I have a thriving bacterial colony of both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, which could take a couple more months.

The tank is a 29 Gallon Cube, unplanted, just plastic plants right now. I have (5) Cory Cats and (6) Glow Fish in the tank. I've just finished dosing of Seachem's Stability (7 days), and just did a 30% water change this morning.

Everything looks great right now, but it's too soon to know whether I'm on the right track with respect to these changes, or whether I'm going overboard with the idea of using both De*Nitrate and Matrix, not to mention whether it would be wise to eventually incorporate other chemical treatments like Phosguard and Purigen.

I realize that all tanks are different, and more time will reveal the ultimate answers for my own tank. But, if I can get a sense of whether what I'm thinking about doing is correct, then I can move forward, or not, with my strategy for the tank.
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post #2 of 20 (permalink) Old 12-11-2016, 03:59 AM
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I think you're barking up the wrong tree. First, even a highly effective bio-filter will do little to combat algae of any kind. Matirx and DeNitrate will not help you. These are pumice stone products that promise to promote both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria to complete the N2 process by converting ammonia->nitrites->nitrates->nitrogen gas. This does not affect algae.
I used both (Matrix & DeNitrate) products for nearly 2 years to attempt to culture anaerobic bacteria to process nitrates into N2 gas. First, I added an additional AC70 filter with an AC30 impeller filled with a mix of Matrix and DeNitrate. Later, I 'invented' a filter that used a LOT of the media and lots of Stability with NO success. I was never able to reduce tank nitrates!
In the end, I find that bio-sponge is perhaps the best bio-media and culturing anaerobic bacteria in our highly oxygenated FW tanks is very difficult, if not impossible.

I'd suggest you invest in sufficient lighting to heavily plant your tank. Use bio-sponge material in your filter. For the brown algae or any free floating algae or diatoms, perhaps consider a UV sterilizer.

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post #3 of 20 (permalink) Old 12-11-2016, 04:42 PM Thread Starter
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Here's why...

Thanks for your reply, and I appreciate all the experimentation you've done with respect to Matrix and De*Nitrate. Perhaps I am barking up the wrong tree with a Matrix/De*Nitrate solution, it could be, but...

I see it as a three front war actually, Nitrogen Cycle, Silicates, and Phosphate levels. I theorize that silicates and phosphates may be just as responsible as the Nitrogen Cycle. I think these three issues have to be addressed to resolve the brown diatom issue.

The term "Brown Algae" is a misnomer. Brown Algae (Diatoms) are not Algae. I don't have any issue with actual algae whatsoever, which makes me think my lighting is under control, along with the fact that I've done considerable experimentation with my lighting to no avail. There's wide disagreement in the forums and online as to whether more or less lighting has any effect whatsoever on brown diatoms (brown algae). I've personally concluded that lighting really has little or no appreciable effect on their proliferation in the tank based on my own experimentation.

Brown Diatoms flourish from silicates being in the water, which with our hard water occurs every time I do a water change or top-off the tank, and silicates and phosphates accumulate every time you top off the tank. Brown Diatomes (Brown Algae) like phosphates (which is tap water related related), and they like Nitrates too. That's why I've been experimenting with Purigen and Phosguard, and want to improve the Nitrogen Cycle, in an effort to help reduce silicates, nitrates, and phosphates in the tank, which reduces the environment for brown diatoms to flourish.

I've been running a Deep Blue UV Sterilizer for the entire time that the brown diatoms have been a problem. UV Sterilizers will only help with parasites, and I do like having a UV sterilizer in the mix to reduce the potential for parasites in the water. But, brown diatoms aren't parasites, so I don't really expect the UV Sterilizer to help me much with brown diatoms.

I've had planted tanks in the past, and frankly, they can complicate this issue because you have to simultaneously worry about properly nourishing them, due to dosing nutrients and delivering proper lighting. So, for now, I've omitted plants so I can focus on the brown algae without having to simultaneously introduce another criteria to worry about, of having to properly nourish the plants without the balancing act of making sure I am not nourishing the brown algae (diatoms).

So, while I might still be barking up the wrong tree with Matrix and De*Nitrate, with lighting eliminated, plants not being an option for now, and UV already running in the tank, that leads me back to the Nitrogen Cycle, Silicates, and Phosphates.

So, my theory about the bio-wheel on the previous Penquin filter not doing it's job was my first lead into a conclusion that the Nitrogen Cycle is part of the issue, and the idea of adding plants also suggests that same avenue of thought.

So, the cheapest fix, if in fact the bio-wheel didn't help to establish an adequate bio-filter in the tank, is to change out the filter design by going to the Aquaclear filters, which I already have in my stash (cheap), and to add the Matrix to the Aquaclear 50 chamber (cheap), and also to experiment with De*Nitrate in the Aquaclear 30 chamber too (cheap), in an effort to establish a better functioning bio-filter.

Once the new bio-filter is established, and my test kit confirms that the cycle is mature, I plan to use Phosguard (cheap) to remove silicates when I do water changes and top-offs. I haven't decided yet whether, once the nitrogen cycle is established, to use Purigen to remove ammonia, nitrites, and nitrates. That might be the time to introduce some live plants instead, but only after I'm convinced I have the diatoms under control.

I am going to try your suggestion of a bio-sponge in one of the Aquaclear filters, probably the Aquaclear 30, where the De*Nitrate is also being housed right now as well. I've heard good things about using a bio-sponge, and your suggesting it reminded me to move forward with that.

Is there a particular brand of bio-sponge you've had the most success with and can recommend?

I've even started to research building a DIY Sulfur/Matrix Denitrator/Reactor Canister Filter. It's one of those DIY projects that are good for winter time. It's cheap to make too, and most parts are easy to get at Lowes, so why not play with it?


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Originally Posted by AbbeysDad View Post
I think you're barking up the wrong tree. First, even a highly effective bio-filter will do little to combat algae of any kind. Matirx and DeNitrate will not help you. These are pumice stone products that promise to promote both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria to complete the N2 process by converting ammonia->nitrites->nitrates->nitrogen gas. This does not affect algae.
I used both (Matrix & DeNitrate) products for nearly 2 years to attempt to culture anaerobic bacteria to process nitrates into N2 gas. First, I added an additional AC70 filter with an AC30 impeller filled with a mix of Matrix and DeNitrate. Later, I 'invented' a filter that used a LOT of the media and lots of Stability with NO success. I was never able to reduce tank nitrates!
In the end, I find that bio-sponge is perhaps the best bio-media and culturing anaerobic bacteria in our highly oxygenated FW tanks is very difficult, if not impossible.

I'd suggest you invest in sufficient lighting to heavily plant your tank. Use bio-sponge material in your filter. For the brown algae or any free floating algae or diatoms, perhaps consider a UV sterilizer.

Last edited by Quizcat; 12-11-2016 at 05:14 PM. Reason: Corrected something...
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post #4 of 20 (permalink) Old 12-11-2016, 05:39 PM
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Is there a particular brand of bio-sponge you've had the most success with and can recommend?
I have two AC70 filters with AC50 impellers on my 60g. They are both configured the same. I use a thin coarse pad (like scotchbrite) to trap detritus, then a standard AC70 sponge, a thinner/finner biosponge, another AC70 type sponge, then a layer of polyester fiber for polish. (there are numerous bio-sponge choices on Amazon).

As food for thought, I've attached a photo of the Matrix/DeNitrate filter I built to attempt the reduction of tank nitrates. The water siphoned in to the bottom and was pulled out by a Tom Aqualifter (3.5gph) pump. I repeatedly dosed with Seachem Stability but could never get anaerobic bacteria to culture and tank nitrates were never reduced.

Live plants were the answer for me as they use ammonia and (some) nitrates as their N2 source indirectly reducing nitrates.

footnotes:
1) Consider higher quality foods that use less/no grain filler/binders (resulting in less fish waste). This also reduces phosphates.
2) API Nitra-Zorb is an excellent nitrate absorber that can be recharged many times in salt water.
3) I never saw much if any real improvement with Purigen and seem to trap more with simple polyester fiber.
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Last edited by AbbeysDad; 12-11-2016 at 05:43 PM. Reason: addendum
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post #5 of 20 (permalink) Old 12-11-2016, 05:41 PM
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Okay, I didn't read any of the above because it's so long (what's the main question/reason for wanting/needing to combine the two?), but maybe this bit of info may help.

Seachem denitrate, matrix and pond matrix are all EXACTLY the same media, just different sizes.

The smaller the pebble size, the more surface area (per volume) for nitrifying bacteria. So in a higher flow filter, denitrate would actually boast the most surface area per volume. Though, it might be overkill as it is. (I don't remember the cost of denitrate vs matrix, so that factors in. Think matrix is cheaper, so that's that)

Denitrate is just meant for very slow waterflow to grow anaerobic bacteria to convert nitrate into nitrogen gas. Now if you were trying to denitrify in a higher flow filter, you would be better off using the larger pond matrix because the deeper internal pores will become clogged, creating low flow/oxygen areas (anaerobic conditions) within the larger media, so that way, anaerobic bacteria can grow internally.
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post #6 of 20 (permalink) Old 12-11-2016, 06:48 PM Thread Starter
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Sorry to be so long winded, but I wanted you to have all the parameters so you could give some good advice.

I didn't know that the Pond Matrix might be the better choice under my circumstances, since I'm trying to convert Nitrates to gas...and toward that end, cultivate anaerobic bacteria in a box filter with higher flow rates.

But, yeah, just trying to grow more anaerobic bacteria, and do it on the cheap for now, versus buying a commercial denitrator/reactor.

Matrix, according to Seachem, is better at cultivating aerobic bacteria, which is fine, but I want good performance converting Nitrates too, so I want to cultivate a nice colony of anaerobic bacteria.

I've got a ton of Lava Rock in my stash...
Do you think that would work better in the Aquaclear filter?
Or sitting in the bottom of the tank????
Better than putting Matrix, De*Nitrate, or Pond Matrix in the filter????

I did have a small bag of De*Nitrate just sitting in the bottom of the tank to resolve the flow issue in the filter, but it's kind of unsightly with respect to tank presentation sitting at the bottom of the tank.

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...it's so long
Bump: Yeah, that's what is so frustrating...you read all the positive reviews, then things never seem to work out when you put all the effort in. Seems like you're following the slow flow rate parameters, so I'm not sure why it didn't work. But experiences like yours has me thinking twice about whether to build a Denitrator Canister, as well as whether Seachem's matrix's are what I need.


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Originally Posted by AbbeysDad View Post
As food for thought, I've attached a photo of the Matrix/DeNitrate filter I built to attempt the reduction of tank nitrates. The water siphoned in to the bottom and was pulled out by a Tom Aqualifter (3.5gph) pump. I repeatedly dosed with Seachem Stability but could never get anaerobic bacteria to culture and tank nitrates were never reduced.

Last edited by Quizcat; 12-11-2016 at 07:42 PM. Reason: None
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post #7 of 20 (permalink) Old 12-11-2016, 07:34 PM
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De*Nitrate requires a flow rate of less than 50 GPH in order to nourish the anaerobic bacteria. Seachem advises that anything higher than 50 GPH will starve the bacteria of nutrients, and the anaerobic bacteria will die.

Seachem recommends a canister filter for De*Nitrate to reduce the oxygen levels so that the anaerobic bacteria can colonize and flourish within the De*Nitrate media. But, I can't seem to find a canister filter anywhere that has less than a 50 GPH flow rate. Most canister filters process at much higher rates. I looked at the Eheim Classic 2211, but it processes at a rate higher than 50 GPH as well.

I do really have a lot of respect for Seachem, but why do they develop a product, then recommend that it should be used in a canister filter that doesn't exist (ie: less than a 50GPH flow rate)..
The low flow you require for DeNitrate is no different than hooking up a UV on a canister.
Tap the filter discharge with a "T" and a valve to control flow, some DIY chamber would work.
Measure with a cup and do the math to set the valve/flow.

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Originally Posted by Quizcat View Post
and Purigen to reduce ammonia, nitrite, or nitrates if they get high. Do you recommend Phosguard in there for times when I top-off the tank? What about Purigen?

not to mention whether it would be wise to eventually incorporate other chemical treatments like Phosguard and Purigen.
I cannot speak for phosguard but when planted you will want a 10:1 ratio of NO3:PO4.

Purigen is an organic scavenging resin, not at all a chemical treatment.
It releases nothing into your water.
Purigen absorbs and collects organics before they break down into their lowest form being NH3.

From Seachem website.
"Purigen® controls ammonia, nitrites and nitrates by removing nitrogenous organic waste that would otherwise release these harmful compounds."

Matrix is pumice, most likely better than lave rock although I use lava rock in all my filters.
Pumice can be had on the web cheap, you can buy the size aggregate you want.


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post #8 of 20 (permalink) Old 12-11-2016, 08:07 PM Thread Starter
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Yeah, good idea, I hadn't thought of that...I think a 29 Gallon tank takes about 350ml of De*Nitrate in the chamber.

I guess the question now is which media is the best for cultivating anaerobic bacteria, and exactly how much of it to use based on the selected media, each type having different pore sizes. Apparently, with respect to De*Nitrate, it needs to be less than a 50GPH flow rate. I wonder if that applies to Lava Rack, etc...

I've read of several accounts where guys that built DIY denitrating chambers operating at very low flow rates, around 3.2 GPH, reported that they didn't have a lot of success. I wonder if the flow rate at 3.2GPH is too slow, or fast for that matter, depending on the particular media (Pore Size).

[QUOTE=Maryland Guppy;9748250]The low flow you require for DeNitrate is no different than hooking up a UV on a canister. Tap the filter discharge with a "T" and a valve to control flow, some DIY chamber would work. Measure with a cup and do the math to set the valve/flow.[Quote]
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post #9 of 20 (permalink) Old 12-11-2016, 08:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quizcat View Post
Sorry to be so long winded, but I wanted you to have all the parameters so you could give some good advice.
Only if it gets read. :-)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Quizcat View Post
I didn't know that the Pond Matrix might be the better choice under my circumstances, since I'm trying to convert Nitrates to gas, and toward that end, cultivate anaerobic bacteria in a box filter with higher flow rates.
But, yeah, just trying to grow more anaerobic bacteria, and do it on the cheap for now...because Matrix, according to Seachem, is better at cultivating aerobic bacteria, which is fine, but I want good performance converting Nitrates too, so I want to cultivate a nice colony of anaerobic bacteria.
The Aquaclear 20, 30, 50 & 70 all use the same motor with interchangeable impellers. At one point, I filled one of my AC70's with a Matrix/DeNitrate mix and used an AC20 impeller for a slow flow. When that didn't reduce nitrates, I built the additional external filter. I don't believe I was ever able to culture anaerobic bacteria in spite of the marketing claims.

Quote:
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I've got a ton of Lava Rock in my stash...Do you think that would work better in the Aquaclear filter or sitting in the bottom of the tank, better than putting Matrix, De*Nitrate, or Pond Matrix in the filter? I did have a small bag of De*Nitrate just sitting in the bottom of the tank to address the flow issue, but it's kind of unsightly with respect to tank presentation.
Matrix/DeNitrate pumice is a form of lava rock. I don't know if generic lava rock has the deeper pores you'd need for anaerobic bacteria culture.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Quizcat View Post
Bump: Yeah, that's what is so frustrating...you read all the positive reviews, then things never seem to work out when you put all the effort in. Seems like you're following the slow flow rate parameters, so I'm not sure why it didn't work. But experiences like yours has me thinking twice about whether to build a Denitrator Canister, as well as whether Seachem's matrix's are what I need.
Nope. After two years of serious experimentation ALL of the Matrix/DeNitrate is in a bin in the basement. I'm using bio-sponge in the filters, 3-4" silica (pool filter) sand substrate and heavily planted low tech.

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Last edited by AbbeysDad; 12-11-2016 at 08:14 PM. Reason: addendum
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post #10 of 20 (permalink) Old 12-11-2016, 09:34 PM Thread Starter
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Glad you mentioned that...I already thought of getting another impeller for the Aquaclear 30, maybe shortening, or even removing, a few of the fins, in hopes that it would cut down the flow rate. Seemed to be a very good idea at the time, only a few bucks for the spare impeller. But, it sounds like that would have been a dead end.

So, do you think it's the media itself? If that's the case, I wish there was a media alternative that would work...

I still have the media that came with the Aquaclear filters called BioMax...little 1/4" squares, lots of pores and voids, but not sure if Biomax has a reputation for cultivating anaerobic bacteria better than anything else on the market.

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The Aquaclear 20, 30, 50 & 70 all use the same motor with interchangeable impellers. At one point, I filled one of my AC70's with a Matrix/DeNitrate mix and used an AC20 impeller for a slow flow. When that didn't reduce nitrates, I built the additional external filter. I don't believe I was ever able to culture anaerobic bacteria in spite of the marketing claims.
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post #11 of 20 (permalink) Old 12-11-2016, 11:32 PM
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https://www.wayfair.com/Featherock-Inc-Natural-Pumice-Gravel-GRAVEL-FTHR1012.html?PiID[]=19298044&source=hotdeals

Here is an example from a very quick search.
Different size aggregate can even be selected.

More faith would be in pumice as opposed to traditional lava rock.
Seems like each piece of pumice is more uniform and consistent.
All the lava rock I have seems to have way different densities among the pieces.


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post #12 of 20 (permalink) Old 12-11-2016, 11:35 PM
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You can find this quote in the last sentence a Seachem Tech wrote "If you need to use a higher flow rate, than stick with Matrix™or try Pond Matrix™, both of which support anaerobic denitrification at higher flow rates."
Creating Anaerobic Bacteria with Pond Matrix - Seachem Support Forums

Lava rock, while it looks to have a lot of pores, those pores are only on the surface. The pores do not create a inner tunnel network like other porous material such as ceramic, Matrix, sintered glass, etc. So it doesn't have any internal surface area like the other medias. So lava rock is pretty much useless for anaerobic bacteria culturing unless you only use it in a very slow flow filter.

For slower water flow you can simply use a ball valve. Using mechanical or any media to slow down flow, helps too, but may not slow it down quite enough. (at least until things start clogging). Nitrate reactor

Denitrification for cheap, plants would probably be the fastest option (aquatic or emersed house plants).
There is also deep sand beds (yes, it works in freshwater too).
Or just do water changes :P Removes organics/TDS too
Anaerobic autotrophs can take awhile to cultivate.

This website has a ton of knowledge on all aquatic stuff. Worth reading if you are interested.
Hydrogen Sulfide in Aquariums
Deep Sand Bucket or Tank | Nitrate Removal Projects
Aquarium Nitrogen Cycle | Cycling Methods | Ammonia & Nitrates

Dentrifity resins are expensive.
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post #13 of 20 (permalink) Old 12-12-2016, 12:25 AM Thread Starter
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According to Seachem, I should only need about 300mL of Pond Matrix for a 30 Gallon tank, which is roughly the same amount recommended for De*Nitrate. So, I actually have room for a bag of both of them in the Aquaclear 30 chamber.

Does anybody know of any reason why slowing down the flow rate below 50 GPH, and having Pond Matrix in there, along with De*Nitrate in the chamber, slowing down the flow just to accommodate the recommended flow rate for De*Nitrate, would have any negative effect upon cultivating aerobic bacteria in Pond Matrix?

I can't really see why it would...It looks like the smallest packaging for Pond Matrix is 1 Liter, and it runs about $19.00 at Amazon.com.

Quote:
Originally Posted by WaterLife View Post
You can find this quote in the last sentence a Seachem Tech wrote "If you need to use a higher flow rate, than stick with Matrix™or try Pond Matrix™, both of which support anaerobic denitrification at higher flow rates."
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post #14 of 20 (permalink) Old 12-12-2016, 03:59 AM
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The two different environments are what determine suitable living conditions for the bacteria. The aerobic nitrifiers like having higher oxygen levels, while the anaerobic denitifiers like having close to no oxygen. The very definitions of aerobic and anaerobic.

Aerobes literally need the oxygen to function/live. So the lack of oxygen dictate how much (little or possibly even none at all) aerobes can be supported with the low oxygen supply
.
Anaerobes are effected by the presence of oxygen molecules, from stopping growth, metabolism, or even killing off the anaerobic bacter.

If you are going to have a <50 GPH nitrate reactor, then just go with denitrate (or matrix if it's more cost efficient). I only recommended pond matrix if you are using a higher flow rate. No harm in using it though, just not as space efficient.

Now I'm pretty sure you can have a small amount of aerobic nitrifiers in the slow flow nitrate reactor, just not nearly as much or efficient as a proper nitrifying biofilter (higher flow/oxygen).
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post #15 of 20 (permalink) Old 12-12-2016, 01:30 PM Thread Starter
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Do you know the size difference of the individual pieces of Pond Matrix versus Matrix and De*Nitrate? I have both Matrix and De*Nitrate, and visually De*Nitrate pieces look to be only about 10% to 15% smaller in individual size. Just trying to get a sense of how Pond Matrix sizes up compared to the other two, and how the individual pieces of Pond Matrix would fit in the filter chamber.

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Originally Posted by WaterLife View Post
I only recommended pond matrix if you are using a higher flow rate. No harm in using it though, just not as space efficient.
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