Dirted tank? - The Planted Tank Forum
 4Likes
  • 2 Post By Maryland Guppy
  • 4 Post By ChrisX
  • 2 Post By twistedaviator
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 06-18-2018, 09:30 PM Thread Starter
Algae Grower
 
Mjoberfeld@yahoo.com's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 24
Dirted tank?

Hey guys,
I was wondering all of your opinions on having a dirted, planted tank. Is it bad for parameters? Too messy? It’s pretty cheap and im kind of on a budget. Any other suggestions are welcome😊. (55 gal)
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 06-18-2018, 09:46 PM
Algae Grower
 
SquigglyThing's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: New York State, USA
Posts: 71
It's easy and it works. Sand makes for the best cap. Don't get fish that dig - cichlids and goldfish are a bad idea unless you pile the bottom with stones to keep them from messing it up. Use a lot of seashells for buffering (in the tank, filter, and/or substrate), or you will have an eternal ph crash.

Coffeepot Dovii Keeper
SquigglyThing is offline  
post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 06-18-2018, 09:52 PM
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Bay Area, California
Posts: 990
Quote:
Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
Hey guys,
I was wondering all of your opinions on having a dirted, planted tank. Is it bad for parameters? Too messy? Itís pretty cheap and im kind of on a budget. Any other suggestions are welcome😊. (55 gal)
cheapest option that packs as much punch as other substrates. Only drawback it is that itll make a mess when moving plants around.
IntotheWRX is offline  
 
post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 06-18-2018, 10:49 PM
Planted Tank Guru
 
Maryland Guppy's Avatar
 
PTrader: (13/100%)
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Arnold
Posts: 3,304
If you use dirt sift all rocks and wood chips from it.
Then soak it first and remove anything that floats, small portions in a bucket.
Things will be less messy when moving plants and we will always move something.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Growing is not that difficult.
Maryland Guppy is offline  
post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 06-18-2018, 10:59 PM
Wannabe Guru
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 1,707
Quote:
Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
Hey guys,
I was wondering all of your opinions on having a dirted, planted tank. Is it bad for parameters? Too messy? It’s pretty cheap and im kind of on a budget. Any other suggestions are welcome😊. (55 gal)
I've kept a dirted tank for a year and have mixed feelings.

I didnt filter out the wood chips so that has been an issue. As plants grow, they push up soil from below. Even if the soil is free of larger debris, you will sometimes see soil deposits.

A bigger problem is in rescaping. If a plant has roots, and you aren't careful, the whole tank could turn into a dark mess if you pull up the wrong plant. Will need a 100% water change if this happens.

I find that soil keeps me from experimenting with aquascaping.

When vaccing the sand, you have to be careful to replace or you could get thin areas of sand where soil is exposed.

Because soil is pushed up and moved around by roots, I find there are many areas of my tank that do not appear to have any soil beneath the sand. Its probably not realistic to think a dirted substrate in a CO2 tank will last longer than 18 months.

Plants get most ferts from the water column, so its not clear how much help the soil is. There are probably plants to which it is a huge benefit. The choice to use soil depends on other considerations. How do you plan to dose ferts? What kinds of plants, etc..

If you have CO2 and plan to dose EI, its not clear how much advantage soil brings to the tank.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
ChrisX is offline  
post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 06-21-2018, 04:36 AM
Algae Grower
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Starkville, MS
Posts: 10
It all depends on what you want in a tank really. If you want live plants, I believe a dirted tank is worth the extra effort needed on the setup stage. Patience is the biggest key to dirt. You're going to put in a lot more work at the beginning, but once it is running, these tanks are fairly simple to maintain IMHO. Do plenty of research and then go for it!

T.A.
roadmaster and roadmaster like this.
twistedaviator is offline  
post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 06-21-2018, 01:10 PM
Planted Tank Guru
 
roadmaster's Avatar
 
PTrader: (1/100%)
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Missouri united states
Posts: 5,576
Quote:
Originally Posted by SquigglyThing View Post
It's easy and it works. Sand makes for the best cap. Don't get fish that dig - cichlids and goldfish are a bad idea unless you pile the bottom with stones to keep them from messing it up. Use a lot of seashells for buffering (in the tank, filter, and/or substrate), or you will have an eternal ph crash.
No "eternal" pH crashes likely unless soil is loaded with peat, and or water changes are few and far between.
Hard for water to change much from source water with weekly water changes Unless,,you are doin something to alter the water chemistry.
Yes the pH will move slightly lower with time (months), but not much lower than source water with regular water changes.
roadmaster is offline  
post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 06-21-2018, 04:11 PM
Algae Grower
 
SquigglyThing's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: New York State, USA
Posts: 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by roadmaster View Post
No "eternal" pH crashes likely unless soil is loaded with peat, and or water changes are few and far between.
Hard for water to change much from source water with weekly water changes Unless,,you are doin something to alter the water chemistry.
Yes the pH will move slightly lower with time (months), but not much lower than source water with regular water changes.
I guess the soil I picked up is loaded with peat. I have a heavilly planted 10g w/ 75% WC weekly.

Coffeepot Dovii Keeper
SquigglyThing is offline  
post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 06-22-2018, 12:34 AM
Wannabe Guru
 
PTrader: (6/100%)
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 1,681
I've no experience with soil but another advantage is that they have a high CEC. When you do dose the water column the soil can hold the excess nutrients until they are needed.
Kubla is offline  
Reply

Tags
None

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Planted Tank Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome