looking to maybe set up 20gal riparium - The Planted Tank Forum
 
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post #1 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-19-2012, 09:07 PM Thread Starter
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looking to maybe set up 20gal riparium

Im thinking of a nice riparium or something of the likes of one in the corner of my room since i just redone it. I have 3 possible tanks all 20 gals that i have to decide from. A 20H, 20L and a long mishaped 20 octagon.

I feel A 20H would give a nice showcase look
But I feel my derimmed 20Long will give the habitants more roam space.

Im leanings towards housing a type of a amphibian within it and would like to know what types would be best, I know people do Newts and Salamaders. Im not sure of the differences between them and absolutely not looking to feed them any crickets or my parents would kill me. well basically any bug that could cause a problem.
I know any amphibian creature i keep would mean no fish but thats alright even though that would just be too great to have cohabitants of both.


I'm not sure if this would make it NOT a riparium but i would like to do a small island for land on one side like possibly a beach setup. Thanks in advance!
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post #2 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-21-2012, 06:06 PM
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Hi,

Hydrophyte is the go-to member around here to help you with your setup. The 20 high sounds likely. I think, technically, when you put animals in it like you're planning, it's called a vivarium. When you're doing an info search, try that term as well...

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post #3 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-21-2012, 06:13 PM
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there are many frogs and toads that would suit the setup that you describe

40 gallon dirt tank
5 Gallon planted bonsai dirt tank
1 Bearded Dragon ''Spyro''
Normal Leopard Gecko ''Shadow''
Super hypo tangerine baldy carrot tail leopard gecko ''Moon''
2 whites tree frogs ''Ying and Yang''
1 Royal Python ''Neptune''
1 Veiled Chameleon '' Yoshi''
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post #4 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-21-2012, 07:05 PM
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I would vote for a 20 High and set it up with a lowered water level and for high-humdity plants, especially crypts.

I would suggest considering fish instead of amphibians. Ripariums are really better suited to use with fish. With a 20 High filled about 40% full you will have about 8 gallons water, which is plenty for some nice nano fish.

A sparkling guorami or two with a group of Boraras rasboras would be really nice in a setup like that.

Here is the 55 that I had set up for crypts, Anubias and ferns. Just imagine slicing tthis down the middle and that is the kind of display you could make in a 20 High.

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post #5 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-21-2012, 08:01 PM
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I agree with Hydrophyte that fish are probably the best bet. But newts are my hobby, so I can give you some advice with those.

Salamanders live on land, so they would not be suitable. However, there are a few fully aquatic newts that would do fine in a riparium. All of them will need cooler temps 60F - low 70F. There are considerations for each species, which I've tried to list below

Hypselotriton orientalis (Chinese firebelly): these are the little black newts with the red bellies often sold cheaply at large petstores. Always wild caught, they arrive in poor condition and often do badly. You can get them captive bred, though. Similar species are the Gold dust newt, sword tail newt, (all Cynops species) etc. These others are almost always available as captive bred. They also all stay pretty small, are nice looking, and are non-aggressive.

Notophthalmus viridescens (Eastern newt): the little green newts sold cheaply in petstores. Never available captive bred. I have these and I love them, but I can't recommend them because the wild caught newts do so badly.

Pleurodeles waltl (Spanish ribbed newt): Big and personable, and always available captive bred. These guys also do well at slightly higher temps. They make great beginner newts.

There are others that do fine fully aquatic, but these are the most commonly seen. All of these will eat live earthworms, blackworms, shrimp, or frozen bloodworms (those little cubes sold in petstores).

ETA: Forgot to mention that all of these also require a lid on the tank - either mesh or glass - because they can all climb. Same for any frog you might put in there.
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post #6 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-21-2012, 11:45 PM
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I think that some kind of anabantoid combined with a small group of some little nano fish would be real good in a setup like that.
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post #7 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-22-2012, 04:07 AM Thread Starter
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yeah fish is probably what im going to end up going with. Thought it over and a amphibian really isnt something im looking to take care of. Especially since last time i had a fire bellied toad. It escaped and my dog ate it.. raunchiest farts I've ever smelt.

Since my room has been redone and is almost done I think im going to have it arranged well enough to keep all 3 of my 20 gal's in one of the corners Despite being have to have a fish room in the basement i rather have them in my room for much better viewing since my basement isnt a finished one and nobody goes down there.. anyway im straying away from my topic.

So the 20high is probably what would be used. An asian bio would probably be cool although i would ideally like to stock barbs in it, but it wouldnt be practical. What would you suggest? good ol' amazon bio?
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post #8 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-22-2012, 04:43 AM
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Why don't you make it a loose SE Asia biotope and use emersed crypts along with some kind of small rasbora and a betta or small gourami? Those things would all go together really well.
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post #9 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-22-2012, 04:46 AM Thread Starter
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probably will be what i do, Some harlequin and a betta will probably be it.. Could I stack pieces of slate up to create a island along the back? i really dont want to deal with hanging pots for the plants, want to make it pretty realistic looking but practical.. do you have a journal on your tank?
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post #10 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-22-2012, 07:21 AM
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If you want to build up something with rocks then it will be more like a paludarium kind of setup and not really a riparium. It is generally easier to set up and get a convincing result to use some kind of riparium planter for a regular riparium setup.
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post #11 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-23-2012, 02:00 AM Thread Starter
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yeah lol after i commented i was looking up Paludarium's and did some research. thanks! sorry i got a little confused with the latter of your comment. you said its easier to set up a Paludarium??
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post #12 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-23-2012, 02:06 AM
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It depends on how you do it, but ripariums are generally easier because you just stick the plant in there with the planter. The key to making it look natural is to grow the plant up nice and full so that it will cover the planter up.

If you want simplicity you can make a paludarium setup pretty easy by stacking up some rocks and planting among them with plants in net pots.
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post #13 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-23-2012, 02:27 AM Thread Starter
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I have a bunch of slate on the side of my house, so i was thinking stacking it up and putting some top soil in there and than planting in that like maybe stacking the slate along the whole length with a few inches to the back than filling it with topsoil and sand

In my head it seems simple to do even though it would take some time i wouldnt mind.. but easier said than done haha
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