Rainx or similar on inside glass of tanks or rocks? - The Planted Tank Forum
 7Likes
  • 1 Post By Ddrizzle
  • 2 Post By Bandit1200
  • 1 Post By sazure
  • 2 Post By Leeatl
  • 1 Post By Bunsen Honeydew
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 15 (permalink) Old 03-30-2019, 09:25 PM Thread Starter
Algae Grower
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 120
Rainx or similar on inside glass of tanks or rocks?

Ok bear with me. I know this sounds absurd but has anyone ever looked into coating their interior tank glass, rocks etc with rainx or that spray coating that protects clothes?

I'm wondering if it would help to prevent ugliness that comes with certain algae breakouts, limiting the damage.

I imagine there are two issues with this:
1. The coating is toxic to fish or plants
2. The coating wears off fast.

I'm NOT here to discuss parameters or how to prevent algae. I realize that is ideal.
tater12 likes this.

Last edited by Ddrizzle; 03-31-2019 at 03:08 AM. Reason: edit
Ddrizzle is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 15 (permalink) Old 03-30-2019, 09:40 PM
Algae Grower
 
tater12's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 25
There’s also ceramic coating that they use to apply to car glass I believe, would be interesting to see if someone has ever done it.
tater12 is offline  
post #3 of 15 (permalink) Old 03-31-2019, 12:10 AM
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
Leeatl's Avatar
 
PTrader: (1/100%)
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Woodstock,Georgia
Posts: 551
I wouldn't do it simply because those things are chemicals and besides the algae would just eat through any coating....lol

My wife says if I get one more aquarium she is going to leave me . I sure am going to miss her fried chicken .
Leeatl is offline  
 
post #4 of 15 (permalink) Old 03-31-2019, 12:40 AM Thread Starter
Algae Grower
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 120
Well the point would be preventing the algae spores to latch onto anything in the first place.
Ddrizzle is offline  
post #5 of 15 (permalink) Old 03-31-2019, 01:47 AM
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
Bandit1200's Avatar
 
PTrader: (4/100%)
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 709
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leeatl View Post
I wouldn't do it simply because those things are chemicals

What about the dihydrogen monoxide you poured in your tank?
Ddrizzle and KFischer like this.
Bandit1200 is offline  
post #6 of 15 (permalink) Old 03-31-2019, 04:49 AM
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
Ken Keating1's Avatar
 
PTrader: (3/100%)
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 729
Umm, interesting thought, it would be the cat's meow if one could develop a product that would prevent algae from growing on glass. RainX on the outside would be nice, easy cleanup, and no water spots


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Ken Keating1 is offline  
post #7 of 15 (permalink) Old 03-31-2019, 12:10 PM
Wannabe Guru
 
KayakJimW's Avatar
 
PTrader: (5/100%)
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Richmond VA
Posts: 1,112
Interesting theory but I can't help think that if algae spores can adhere to clean glass they'll latch onto anything, including whatever (non-toxic)coating. Or if certain coatings would reflect light in a way to encourage algae. I do like the idea though

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bandit1200 View Post
What about the dihydrogen monoxide you poured in your tank?
Are you crazy?! That stuff's been know to kill people!

92% of all statistics are made up on the spot.
KayakJimW is offline  
post #8 of 15 (permalink) Old 03-31-2019, 11:45 PM
Wannabe Guru
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jun 2017
Posts: 1,008
Quote:
Well the point would be preventing the algae spores to latch onto anything in the first place.
It wouldn't be a permanent fix and it would have to be reapplied frequently. Also it would prevent minerals from building up on the glass. And if a mineral layer does form the algae will start to grow on the minerals.
Surf is offline  
post #9 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-04-2019, 09:41 PM
Algae Grower
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 16
Sorry but I am sometimes simply stunned at some of the questions AND answers. Back to Aquarium Basics 101. Here is a link to the MSDS of this product. Also a link to OSHA, Note the chemicals in it which would be highly toxic to both fish and plants. (decades of aquarium fish keeping, legal and medical research background and biology and preVet/Oceanography, chemistry and chemistry of arts).

Such products, window and other cleaners should never be used around fish tanks as well. The air intank supply allows it as a gas to be taken up by the water. Great books on Basics is the Dr. Innes books (from 30's, 40's and steller)

OSHA Regulatory Status
https://www.rainx.com/wp-content/upl...-Treatment.pdf

- Toxic to aquatic life with long lasting effects
- This chemical is considered hazardous by the 2012 OSHA Hazard Communication Standard (29 CFR 1910.1200)

https://www.rainx.com/wp-content/upl...-Treatment.pdf

__________________________________________________ ___________________________________________
11890
-
Rain-X Original Glass Treatment
Revision Date
09-Apr-2015
Precautionary Statements - Prevention
Obtain special instructions before use
Do not handle until all safety precautions have been read and understood
Use personal protective equipment as required
Wash face, hands and any exposed skin thoroughly after handling
Wear eye/face protection
Avoid breathing dust/fume/gas/mist/vapors/spray
Use only outdoors or in a well-ventilated area
Precautionary Statements - Response
IF exposed or concerned: Get medical advice/attention
IF SWALLOWED: Rinse mouth. DO NO induce vomiting
IF SKIN irritation occurs: rinse thoroughly and get medical advice
IF IN EYES: Rinse cautiously with water for several minutes. Remove contact lenses, if present and easy to do. Continue rinsing
If eye irritation persists: Get medical advice/attention
IF INHALED: Remove victim to fresh air and keep at rest in a position comfortable for breathing
Precautionary Statements - Storage
Store locked up
Store in a well-ventilated place. Keep container tightly closed
Keep out of reach of children
Precautionary Statements - Disposal
Dispose of contents/container to an approved waste disposal plant
Hazards not otherwise classified (HNOC)

Other Information

3. COMPOSITION/INFORMATION ON INGREDIENTS

ETHANOL
ACETONE
ISOPROPYL ALCOHOL
Sulfuric acid

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rain-X

Bump: It would not matter both fish and plants would be dead - highly toxic to both.

Bump: Such a highly toxic product could be "up taken" by the air supply and enter the aquarium having the same highly deleterious effects - it is a highly toxic product. Clean glass with newspaper and lemon or hydrogen peroxide. And "elbow" grease.

I found the product and company that made a superb product. They deal with larger situations but they allowed me to buy a small amount. My water was so clear that when I sold my many aquariums when leaving NYC people asked if there was water in them.

Anyway, I saved the information on a backup driver. Superb product - little "bio bugs" that balance the water chemistry and as I stated helps with algae and other issues.

Note: I did not drain my aquariums as they suggest (up to 100 gallons) as for the most part they were balanced and doing so would create it's own problems. I did a partial (which I did 1/4 each week and slowly dribbled in pre filtered heated water) then added the solution of "bugs" (one does not apply them directly to the water). Amazing product. (but never replaces the basics).

Bio-Future, Biodigesters, a non-chemical alternative for aquarium cleaner, biological aquarium cleaner.

Bio-Future, algae removal, pond scum elimination in waterscapes, ponds, fountains and water features of all kinds


Aquariums are lovely little bits of heaven that have been proven to lower your blood pressure and heart rate; some claim they extend your life.

Anyone who owns an aquarium, salt or fresh water knows that constant care and maintenance is the key an appealing waterscape and happy healthy fish. Now there is a way to obtain these results without the constant cleaning.

Biodigesters are the answer

Biodigesters been specially designed to inhibit algae growth in aquariums by removing its food sources. Biodigesters (affectionately referred to as “bugs”) are a combination of all natural bacteria, lab grade purified enzymes with micro and macro nutrients. Biodigesters bacteria and enzymes are targeted to the food sources available in your aquariums water. Biodigesters can successfully attack, degrade, and liquefy fecal mass, undigested food, and other organics that contribute to a build-up of ammonia and bottom solids within the aquarium. Biodigesters condition the marine environments ecology, close to natures own.

Biodigesters microbes are reliable scavengers that thrive on organic mass (waste). As supplied they are in suspended animation (micro-encapsulated) but are revived when added to the tank. Shortly thereafter, they begin to digest excreta, excess food, oxidize ammonia, reduce nitrites, nitrates, and other N-Compounds and reduce odors.

Biodigesters proprietary blend of all natural bio-cultures and enzymes have been selected for their ability to effectively digest/degrade extremely heavy concentrations of organic mass within an aquatic system. Reducing those hostile factors that have been determined to be detrimental to the health and life cycle of both fin and shell fish.

Application and Dosing Rates

Biodigesters dry formula is used for seed dosing (initial propagation) and maintenance.

Seed Dose:
1 tsp. per 300 gallons

Maintenance:
1/4 tsp. per 300 gallons each week

You simply mix the product into warm (not hot) water and evenly introduce it around the aquarium.

What to Expect After Application

2 to 4 days there will be a reduction in nitrogen and phosphorus levels.
3 to 4 days there will be a reduction in odors.
8 to 10 days there should be a visible improvement in clarity and water quality.

Addition Benefits of Biodigesters

1. Eliminate odors by digesting the organic bottom solids and the naturally occurring bacteria that produce odors.
2. Decrease oxygen requirements for oxidation of organic matter within the water column, thus increasing available oxygen for fish.
3. Reduce bottom solids by converting organic matter to carbon dioxide and water.
4. Eliminates glass and bottom scum by digesting algae’s primary food source (nitrogen and phosphorus). As the algae dies from lack of food and is digested by the Biodigesters.
5. Improves water clarity and quality by digesting suspended organics in the water column.
6. Biodigesters, which do extend the life of a filtration system, mean lower maintenance costs and more effective optimization of water conditions.

Special Notes

For the best performance of Biodigesters, drain and clean the aquarium prior to treating. This makes it easier and faster for the microorganisms to establish control of your system. Do not use protein skimming devices when using Biodigesters.

Packaging is in 8 oz. Jars, 1 pound Jars and 20 lb. kegs. (Liquid by quote only)
Leeatl likes this.

Last edited by Darkblade48; 04-05-2019 at 04:23 AM. Reason: Please use the edit function for back to back posts to keep threads cleaner
sazure is offline  
post #10 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-04-2019, 11:13 PM
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
Bunsen Honeydew's Avatar
 
PTrader: (2/100%)
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 374
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leeatl View Post
I wouldn't do it simply because those things are chemicals and besides the algae would just eat through any coating....lol
Everything is a chemical.

Sent from my Pixel 3 XL using Tapatalk

“Science, my lad, is made up of mistakes, but they are mistakes which it is useful to make, because they lead little by little to the truth.” -Jules Verne
Bunsen Honeydew is offline  
post #11 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-05-2019, 12:35 AM
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
Leeatl's Avatar
 
PTrader: (1/100%)
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Woodstock,Georgia
Posts: 551
Ok,ok, I edit my original post....they are dangerous,hazardous, chemicals that I would not put in my tanks...check out the MSDS on Rain-X . Bunch of wise guys.....
babystarz and evil8 like this.

My wife says if I get one more aquarium she is going to leave me . I sure am going to miss her fried chicken .
Leeatl is offline  
post #12 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-05-2019, 12:45 AM
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
Bunsen Honeydew's Avatar
 
PTrader: (2/100%)
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 374
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leeatl View Post
Ok,ok, I edit my original post....they are dangerous,hazardous, chemicals that I would not put in my tanks...check out the MSDS on Rain-X . Bunch of wise guys.....
I'm a chemist, I had to. While I'd never add any of those things to my aquarium, there is nothing terribly hazardous there, especially in small quantities.

Sent from my Pixel 3 XL using Tapatalk

“Science, my lad, is made up of mistakes, but they are mistakes which it is useful to make, because they lead little by little to the truth.” -Jules Verne
Bunsen Honeydew is offline  
post #13 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-05-2019, 01:28 AM
Wannabe Guru
 
mgeorges's Avatar
 
PTrader: (4/100%)
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Shawnee, KS
Posts: 1,244
This actually gave me an interesting idea - I love the look of my seiryu stone, I don't like that it leaches. I'd never considered coating it in anything...
Concrete epoxy! It's used to seal concrete fish tanks. I doubt it would prevent algae on your rocks, but should seal them from leaching, for a while anyhow! I may have to give this a go.
mgeorges is offline  
post #14 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-05-2019, 05:10 AM
Newbie
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Feb 2019
Posts: 1
Stick with the "ideal" way of dealing with algae, no need to discuss.

Putting Rain X on the inside of your glass is ridiculous, end of story.
szwamp is offline  
post #15 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-05-2019, 10:25 AM
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
Bunsen Honeydew's Avatar
 
PTrader: (2/100%)
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 374
Well, now that somebody told us that it is ridiculous, i want to try it.

Honestly, coming at this as a materials chemist, an anti-fouling coating on silica glass doesn't seem like a terribly high hurdle from a technical perspective. If applied to an empty tank and allowed to dry/cure completely, toxicity of anything on the SDS and OSHA documents shouldn't be a concern. Looking at the formulation in the patent (United States Patent: 7344783), my biggest concern would be the quaternary ammonium compounds. If I were going to do this experiment (I'm not for a few reasons), I would apply to the dry glass, allow to cure, then fill the tank, allow the water to sit for a day, then completely drain to try to leach out the quat. I'd probably repeat the fill/drain cycle to a total of 5 cycles. Things left to consider would be the durability of the coating. One would obviously not want to have to completely empty an aquarium to reapply at any interval to avoid algae growth since this would likely be the most effort intensive way of controlling algae on your glass. Another thing to consider is that it could end up not looking very good. It is easy to imagine that a hydrophobic coating would increase things like bubbles on the glass, or even the appearance of organic films that are usually formed on the surface of the water.

To be clear, this is a hypothetical thought experiment exercise and I would not recommend anyone actually try this. Especially since determining whether the final coating is fish-safe would mean live animal testing. While such testing is often needed for development, since this application seems to provide no practical benefit it would be difficult to argue that such testing would meet an ethical standard.

[/nerding out]
ipkiss likes this.

“Science, my lad, is made up of mistakes, but they are mistakes which it is useful to make, because they lead little by little to the truth.” -Jules Verne
Bunsen Honeydew is offline  
Reply

Tags
None

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Planted Tank Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
LFS In Chicago Area -- Updated Feb 13, '12 larcat Illinois 71 03-15-2017 05:49 AM
Sand sticking to inside of glass? dbw27 General Planted Tank Discussion 4 09-11-2014 11:46 PM
DIY All Glass Tank, ADA style rimless, frameless, and finished!!! - 56K Warning scolley DIY 658 06-08-2013 05:43 AM
Quality of glass used in AGA tanks - optical clarity pineapple General Planted Tank Discussion 3 04-16-2004 02:04 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome