Does Size really count??? - The Planted Tank Forum
 
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post #1 of 14 (permalink) Old 03-25-2006, 05:37 AM Thread Starter
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Does Size really count???

I am thinking of the size of the tank!!!

Having a poll about size in this forum which somewhat informative, my question is if size is a determining factor in designating a tank as a Nano Tank, what else in your personal opinions also will determine a tank as a Nano Tank?

Since Nano is to be very small, I consider Nano Tanks to be smaller than 10 gal. and the aquacape should be small but yet give the appearance of a larger tank. The use of small plants and small fish should be included in determining a tank as a Nano Tank.

Please post your thoughts on what should determine a tank as a Nano Tank.


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post #2 of 14 (permalink) Old 03-25-2006, 08:10 AM
 
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IMO i think a 10 gal is too big to be a nano - but if 600 gals tanks are what you normally got around - a 10 gal would be nano too...

So nano is (IMO) what you compare it to.
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post #3 of 14 (permalink) Old 03-25-2006, 01:56 PM
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personally 5 gals and under seems like a nano to me a ten gallon is a tank it gives difficulties to scape due to size but it is no where neare the difficulites a 1, or 5 gallon tank gives also at the size of a 10 gal a filter is needed, on a 5 its not nessisary and on one gals i dont think anyone has filters ( with some exceptions (red sea nano's)) but a one gallon does not even compare with a ten i can hardely fit my hand in my one gallon bowl to plant when the hard scape is in. So for me its 5 gals-1 gal.
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post #4 of 14 (permalink) Old 03-25-2006, 06:38 PM
 
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well i dont think you should measure a nano by the volume - but on size. I mean the difference between a 5 gal kubicsize (0.87'x0.87'x0.87'x) and a 7,4 gal (1'x1'x1'x) is less than 2 inches.

I think a 1'x1'x1'x is a good max size.

And i dont think you can compare a planted nano tank size with a saltwater nano-reef... Planted nano tanks should be smaller.
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post #5 of 14 (permalink) Old 03-25-2006, 10:15 PM Thread Starter
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Very interesting comments so far. But not one addresses the actual question. The question is, and please read the first posting:

Having a poll about size in this forum which is somewhat informative, my question is if size is a determining factor in designating a tank as a Nano Tank, what else in your personal opinions also will determine a tank as a Nano Tank?

In other words we all have agreed that size is a determining factor in the designation of a Nano Tank, but what other factors should be included as determining factors to designate a tank as a Nano Tank.


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post #6 of 14 (permalink) Old 03-25-2006, 11:04 PM
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5 gal and under. Size pretty much determines it.

"I go right into the aquascaping without any design."
-Takashi Amano
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post #7 of 14 (permalink) Old 03-26-2006, 01:08 AM
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i think a nano tank is anything really under 10 gallons. really as long as the tank gets its point across i see it as being fine. reguardless of size.

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post #8 of 14 (permalink) Old 03-26-2006, 01:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aquaphish
Very interesting comments so far. But not one addresses the actual question. The question is, and please read the first posting:

Having a poll about size in this forum which is somewhat informative, my question is if size is a determining factor in designating a tank as a Nano Tank, what else in your personal opinions also will determine a tank as a Nano Tank?

In other words we all have agreed that size is a determining factor in the designation of a Nano Tank, but what other factors should be included as determining factors to designate a tank as a Nano Tank.
Not to be too cynical, but over the time I've been a member here, I've become convinced that some people only respond to the subject line and don't bother to read the actual post, or answer the actual question.

But since I didn't get around to answering the poll, I'll give my 2 cents there. A nano to me is less than 10 gallons. Why? Because a 10 gallon is such a bloody common size. 1/2 the kids in America own one at some point or another it seems.

What else? I think you were basically correct in your original post: a nano tank is a nano because everything is scaled down. Small fish, small landscape, small everything, such that the end product looks bigger. Amano accomplished just that in some of my favorite tanks from his books. When I was about 8 years old, I had a 5.5 gallon tank with a single 6" goldfish in it (yes, yes, terrible, I know, but my parents didn't know any better and neither did I). Going strictly by size, this was a nano tank. But it wasn't. It had no landscaping, just clown puke gravel. Nano has to be more than just size.
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post #9 of 14 (permalink) Old 03-26-2006, 08:04 AM
 
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what else in your personal opinions also will determine a tank as a Nano Tank?
The difference between a small tank and a nano, is the aquascape. Like Canoe2Can said, everything is scaled down, fish, roots, plants. And the composition is different than a "normal" tank.
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post #10 of 14 (permalink) Old 03-26-2006, 01:25 PM
 
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(1) the number of inhabitants
(2) the volume of the substrate
(3) the time you devote to it

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post #11 of 14 (permalink) Old 03-26-2006, 01:29 PM
 
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Yes, size counts. And I agree with Anti-Pjerrot.

Other factors in deciding what is "Nano" are: that the equipment, plants, and livestock are scaled down purposefully to present a scape that conveys a larger size.

For example, a tank that is bought as a 10 gallon kit and stocked with bread and butter fish and plants I would consider to be a small planted tank.

However, if you purchase a ten gallon tank and choose equipment that fits your intent of creating a scape that makes it a nano, then I would consider it a nano tank. 10 seems to be the magic number because it's so ubiquitous.

It would be like..... the difference between putting three photographs side by side and it would just be 3 photos on the wall versus 3 photographs side by side with the intent of making it into a triptych.

Also, internationally, 10 gallons is not as common as it is in the U.S. therefore it is still a gray with the distinction again being the intent and process of the aquarist.
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post #12 of 14 (permalink) Old 03-26-2006, 06:33 PM
 
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In my house, I only get one large tank. So, I employ stealth methods in order to have more than the allotted one. That means I've had bunches of teeny tanks set up in odd areas and moved around the house in order to escape detection. (It works for Osama...)

Anyway, having done all these nanos, I've come to feel that the very small tanks don't allow for the complexity of design that keeps my eye interested. And it isn't that I don't have the asian feel for open space, either. They just seem to come down to some grass in a cup, give or take a shrimp or two...I think there might be a "too small" as well as a "too large" parameter for a truly interesting tank. IMO, 4-8 gal is an ideal size.

Fig
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post #13 of 14 (permalink) Old 03-28-2006, 12:17 AM
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I agree with sarahbobarah - a nano is designed to look much bigger than it really is.

I also agree with figgy - there comes a point when you just can't make that happen very easily. I have a 2.5 gal I'm very happy with, but my smaller tanks just don't quite do it for me... so I end up using them as experimental tanks to try out new plants, substrate, etc. (not to stare at for long periods of time).

So to answer the question, first and foremost size (I think less than 10 gal) but it's just not a nano unless you've put a lot of effort into 'scaping with carefully selected tiny plants, fish, hardscape, etc.


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post #14 of 14 (permalink) Old 03-28-2006, 07:51 PM
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Smaller than a 10 gallon to be sure.

Often requires some unusual equipment or creative thinking, though that has changed a bit with red sea's and other new products. The fish world is designed for 10 gallons or larger, not smaller. Lights, filters, CO2, substrate, plants usually carried and fish usually stocked are, in 95% of the cases, too big for anything under 10, and certainly 5 gallon tanks.

The tanks are often DIY or originally designed for other purposes (glass vases), though this is changing. Until CF lighting, the smallest floros were 12". Even now CF lights are usually 7" or so long so many people have to resort to desk lamps with 5000k or 6500k replacement bulbs.

Nanos, to me, are about the creativity required as much as anything. It's a very DIY sized tank, just as tanks over 250 (or so) gallons will often be. It's a set-up where you are on the fringe of what the equipment is designed for and what most common knowledge is based on.

How's that for something a little more explicit than "smaller than 12" on a side"?
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