White slime of death... - Page 4 - The Planted Tank Forum
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #46 of 52 (permalink) Old 02-04-2010, 04:26 PM
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
PTrader: (2/100%)
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Morgan Hill, CA
Posts: 791
Quote:
Originally Posted by JtotheS View Post
Even better. I do have an unused bucket or two around already. The three quarantined fish are looking even better. There's a small one that I'm afraid of still losing, but the other two are full of energy!
Just don't use a bucket you've had chemicals in.
cjp999 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #47 of 52 (permalink) Old 02-04-2010, 10:45 PM
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
Olskule's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 542
Quote:
Originally Posted by cjp999 View Post
...Also keep in mind that I believe columnaris can lurk in a tank indefinitely. I've seen this mentioned more than once, but I'm not sure if it is true....However, I've also seen these same statement said of ich, which is definitely not true.
Fungus and bacteria, being such extremely primative lifeforms, are naturally better able to survive harsh conditions (such as drying out entirely) and thus be transferred by their viable reproductive cells hitch-hiking for long periods of time to reach another environment condusive to their propagation. "Ich", or "Ick", (Ichthyophthirius multifiliis), on the other hand, is a protozoa, and like most (but not all) animals, cannot survive being removed from its normal environment because it does not have a dormant stage that allows it to wait until it ends up in an environment that meets its requirements. (Brine shrimp and fairy shrimp are a strong exception to this generalization.)

Bacteria and fungus often arrive in any body of water-from lake to a glass of water-on a "contaminated" object or simply through the air, and if they find conditions that suit them, they will multiply. (This is why you can establish a proper nitrogen cycle by simply adding something for the bacteria to "eat" then just waiting, without adding a bacterial culture.) So, while the culprits are there, the healthy fish's immune system is constantly fighting them off and keeping them from multiplying to more harmful levels. But when parameters change, even just finally crossing a fine line in water quality, and a fish becomes stressed just enough, then the harmful organism gains a foot-hold and is able to multiply in the one fish first, then, by its new overwhelming numbers, it is able to attack the other exposed fish in the enclosed environment of the aquarium. Wild populations of fish are aided in fighting these diseases by simple dilution of the concentration of the organisms in the more vast waters of their environment, whereas our poor pet fish are trapped "in the same room" with an increasing numbers of their attackers and without our help, soon succumb. This is why an onslaught such as Phoenix-cry can occur so rapidly.

Olskule

"May the Fish be with you."
Olskule is offline  
post #48 of 52 (permalink) Old 02-05-2010, 12:33 AM
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
PTrader: (2/100%)
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Morgan Hill, CA
Posts: 791
Thanks for the explanation. Although that was kind of what I had in mind, you presented the facts very clearly. These bacteria tend to be present (although I doubt all bacterial diseases are always present), but it takes either a large enough concentration of them or a weakened immune system for them to infect. Infecting one weakened fish then gives the concentration needed to go after healthy fish too.

Makes me wonder if euthanasia isn't a prudent choice for any fish that reaches a permanent weakened state; either due to age or difficulty fully recovering from an injury or illness. Often the damage done by an illness, including from the meds used to cure the illness, leaves the fish permanently weakened. Same is true of ammonia damage to the gills. These fish are prone to illnesses like columaris, and then spreading it to tank mates.

For the mollies I have that got columnaris, I think I'm done treating them. They've gone through enough treatments over the past 6 weeks. It appears to be gone now, but if it comes back (it will be the 3rd time coming back for a couple of them), I'll probably just euthanize them. Only 3 of 18 got sick in the first place, so I suspect they already have a weaker tolerance for columnaris than the others.
cjp999 is offline  
 
post #49 of 52 (permalink) Old 02-05-2010, 02:56 AM
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
Olskule's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 542
Quote:
Originally Posted by cjp999 View Post
... Only 3 of 18 got sick in the first place, so I suspect they already have a weaker tolerance for columnaris than the others.
That could be. There is always the factor of inherent genetic tolerance or intolerance for certain diseases or conditions, and controlled breeding for desirable traits (usually visual traits in aquarium fish) often produces hidden traits with negative consequences, such as susceptibility to certain diseases. This is akin to hip dysplasia in certain breeds of dogs.

Olskule

"May the Fish be with you."
Olskule is offline  
post #50 of 52 (permalink) Old 02-05-2010, 03:12 PM
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
rasetsu's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Frisco, TX
Posts: 450
Quote:
Originally Posted by cjp999 View Post
Makes me wonder if euthanasia isn't a prudent choice for any fish that reaches a permanent weakened state; either due to age or difficulty fully recovering from an injury or illness. Often the damage done by an illness, including from the meds used to cure the illness, leaves the fish permanently weakened. Same is true of ammonia damage to the gills. These fish are prone to illnesses like columaris, and then spreading it to tank mates.
Unfortunately, this is my current philosophy as well after having spent lots of money on meds in the past that may or may not cure the disease but tend to throw the system into chaos.

If I see any small fish (tetras and rasboras) that in my experience do not respond quickly to meds begining to exhibit any combination of physical signs of illness (such as seperation from the group, bobbing at the surface, drifting around in the current, etc.) I will net it out to euthanize before it has a higher chance to spread whatever it has or dies and gets cannabalized. If it's extremely easy to catch, then it's not going to make it. If it runs away and still eats, then I will give it a fighting chance.
rasetsu is offline  
post #51 of 52 (permalink) Old 02-06-2010, 01:33 AM
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
Olskule's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 542
Euthanasia

Unfortunately, euthanasia is often the ultimate example of being "cruel to be kind", and the hardest to accept.

Olskule

"May the Fish be with you."
Olskule is offline  
post #52 of 52 (permalink) Old 09-16-2020, 06:57 PM
Newbie
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Sep 2020
Posts: 1
I had the white slime all over my tank driftwood and everything.Lost a bunch of fish. I raised temp to 86 degrees abd it seemed to go away in one week.
denB is offline  
Reply

Tags
None

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Planted Tank Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome