Neon Tetra Disease Life Cycle - The Planted Tank Forum
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post #1 of 10 (permalink) Old 05-14-2019, 11:15 PM Thread Starter
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Neon Tetra Disease Life Cycle

So based on a lot of time reading site after site I am reasonably sure I have had neon tetra disease rampant in my tank. The neons i have only had for a while and my LFS does a month guarantee and took them all back, the first and second batch of them to quarantine them. So now i have only corydoras left in the tank which I've read in a lot of places that that cannot get NTD.

My question is, say i still would like to have neon tetras(crazy thought) how long would i have to wait since they have no host?

I've read conflicting reports from many sources about the time NTD can survive in water column only, some say only 2-4 weeks. Some say Several months, And a few suggest indefinitely, which i am skeptical of.

I can't really do a full tank breakdown which is the main thing I am trying to avoid here as I cannot rehome my corys to another tank and really prefer to not have to toss all my new plants that i just got a few weeks ago.

Any suggestions and personal experience is very welcome.

Cordially,

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post #2 of 10 (permalink) Old 05-14-2019, 11:51 PM
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Ha I was in the same boat and gave up on the neons. Pretty sure I caught it before taking over my tank (knocks on wood). From what I read any other fish can get it if they eat a dead infected fish or if it gets in the water column even corys. Then again many say cardinals are resistant to it so that could be a alternative. Sorry not much help, this was nowhere as prevalent in the 80s it seems (atleast that I can remember). Lots of those fish were wild if I remember correctly and the biggest issue we had with neons back then was ich.
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post #3 of 10 (permalink) Old 05-15-2019, 12:34 AM Thread Starter
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There was a tiny bit of ich happening too, Then the discolored internal blotches, bottom dwelling, non schooling, irregular swimming, and restless twitching started up as well. All that led me to NTD. Just trying to figure out if they are even viable option in that tank or if it is perpetually infected long term. I really like the neons but I had a bit of bad luck it seems.

Bump: Another problem was before this was identified one fish rapidly went downhill overnight and was essentially eaten up overnight...
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post #4 of 10 (permalink) Old 05-15-2019, 01:03 AM
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NTD is not well understood. Thinking is that the parasites can survive a short while (several days) outside of a host. It is also believed that healthy fish can harbor it without showing symptoms. Then, if stressed for whatever reason, it can kill the fish. It is generally accepted that the primary (if not only) means of transmission is by eating dead fish having the disease. So, it is always a good practice to rapidly remove any dead fish or fish that you deem to be terminally ill.

you may want to read through this thread for more info: https://www.plantedtank.net/forums/2...ned-about.html
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post #5 of 10 (permalink) Old 05-15-2019, 02:04 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for quick replies, and I appreciate the help.

That other thread had some good information.

But does anyone know or have a suggestion of when it'd be safe to try rasboras or neons again?

I was thinking in a month try a small group and see how they go.
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post #6 of 10 (permalink) Old 05-15-2019, 04:01 AM
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Every few years, I bulk-up on neons to replace the part of the school that has perished. When I do this, I'll buy 5-8 at a time and put them in a QT. When I notice a symptom, I remove the fish immediately. Sometimes, one will die and I can't always get to it before it's eaten. So, I will end up making 2-3 purchases in succession. I am of the belief that NTD will show very quickly with neons stressed by the new environment and that the disease isn't easily transmitted without being eaten. I simply watch carefully for about three weeks and then move them to my display tank. So, I don't think there is any point in waiting to add more, unlike with something like ich. It's more important to watch carefully for a few weeks, and take quick action to avoid any risk.
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post #7 of 10 (permalink) Old 05-15-2019, 05:38 AM
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Here is an article that may be helpful for you.
https://zebrafish.org/wiki/health/di...ozoan_diseases

Here is a bit I extracted from article about prevention:

"Based on our understanding of the parasite at this time, the following practices would likely reduce the spread and impact of the infection 1) ensure that water in recirculating systems is adequately treated with UV sterilization, 2) with existing infections, remove and euthanize all emaciated and moribund fish as soon as possible to prevent cannibalism and further transmission, 3) consider screening of brood fish, particularly females, for the parasite to reduce the risk of transferring the infection into a facility with their progeny, 4) rear potentially infected fish in optimum conditions and reduce stress to minimize the impact of the infection, and 5) minimize potential for cross-contamination of stocks by assigning dedicated populations of wild-type fish for out crossing to each mutant stock. After breeding, these wild-type fish should not be returned to a common stock tank nor be crossed to any other mutant stock."

180 g. low tech w/ wild South American cichlids, corydoras eques, and African Congo riverine tetras.
60 g. low tech w/ F1 Alenquer pair /Stendker "Tefe" discus and wild Altum Angels
30 g. low tech w/ Wild Tucano tetras
30 g. low-tech African Biotope
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post #8 of 10 (permalink) Old 05-15-2019, 11:31 AM Thread Starter
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Alright thanks everyone I appreciate the help a lot. My LFS is actually not very local(1hr away) so I will probably wait at least 2 weeks anyway. Then I will keep a very close eye on those neons for a while.
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post #9 of 10 (permalink) Old 05-15-2019, 06:46 PM
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Hi, I've been keeping schools of neon tetras alive for many many years. There are some tricks that I've found:

They require clean water, cleaner than what you normally have for guppies/mollies etc.

The store bought ones are actually juveniles/teens. A fully mature neon is actually quite big and they are sometimes sold as neon tetra lg (large). Those are much more hardy than the regular neons which are basically not fully grown.

They like darkness, real darkness. In fact, they would probably prefer if you covered the tank in black drapes. I see a lot of brightly lit aquascape tanks with neons thrown in, and those are inevitably going to stress them out.
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post #10 of 10 (permalink) Old 05-15-2019, 07:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by united natures View Post
Hi, I've been keeping schools of neon tetras alive for many many years. There are some tricks that I've found:

They require clean water, cleaner than what you normally have for guppies/mollies etc.

The store bought ones are actually juveniles/teens. A fully mature neon is actually quite big and they are sometimes sold as neon tetra lg (large). Those are much more hardy than the regular neons which are basically not fully grown.

They like darkness, real darkness. In fact, they would probably prefer if you covered the tank in black drapes. I see a lot of brightly lit aquascape tanks with neons thrown in, and those are inevitably going to stress them out.
All very good points and very true...

180 g. low tech w/ wild South American cichlids, corydoras eques, and African Congo riverine tetras.
60 g. low tech w/ F1 Alenquer pair /Stendker "Tefe" discus and wild Altum Angels
30 g. low tech w/ Wild Tucano tetras
30 g. low-tech African Biotope
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