Ich: Should I Treat? - The Planted Tank Forum
 3Likes
  • 2 Post By lksdrinker
  • 2 Post By Ken Keating1
  • 2 Post By Ken Keating1
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 7 (permalink) Old 04-29-2018, 02:18 AM Thread Starter
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
Ken Keating1's Avatar
 
PTrader: (3/100%)
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 771
Ich: Should I Treat?

I acquired 10 blue neon rainbow fish last week on Saturday. On Sunday evening I noticed one of my rummy nose had two ich spots on the fins. The next morning, they were gone. Over the past week a few fish have gotten ich spots here and there, never more than two spots per fish, but within a few hours the spots disappear. I’ve counted a total of 7 spots. I raised the aquarium temp up to 82 in anticipation of a full tank breakout, but that has not materialized. I have the following fish:

10 Rummy Nose

10 Blue Neon Rainbows

12 Pigmy Cory’s

4 Julian Cory’s

4 Kuli Loach’s

3 Otos

1 Marble Hatchet

Only the Rummy Nose and Rainbows have shown ich spots.

All fish are very healthy, get a variety of food, flake, frozen and live. The tank gets 50% WC once a week. Water parameters are excellent. No fish are showing signs of distress.

I’ve research and found out that if fish survive a ich infection they can develop an immune response and become resistant to re-infection. I’m thinking if the fish are slowing getting ich and able to fight it off, their immunity would be a benefit to their long-term health.

I picked up some SeaChem MetroPlex today for medication, but as of now no fish have any ich spots. Should I go forward with treatment or wait this out and see what happens? If I had multiple fish with ich and it remained for longer that 24 hours I would start immediately. Last night I counted two spots total. As of this morning no ich is present on any fish, so they’ve been ich free for at least 12 hours.

Also, yes, I just learned the benefits of a quarantine tank!! Also, I've researched and I'm familiar with ich's life cycle.

Any recommendations would be appreciated.
Ken Keating1 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 7 (permalink) Old 05-01-2018, 06:37 PM
Planted Member
 
Rnasty's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jun 2017
Posts: 215
My method - don't medicate unless you have to. If they are able to fight it off on their own it's better to do it that way
Rnasty is offline  
post #3 of 7 (permalink) Old 05-01-2018, 07:28 PM
Wannabe Guru
 
mgeorges's Avatar
 
PTrader: (4/100%)
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Shawnee, KS
Posts: 1,287
I've never had to medicate for Ich. As new fish are added, they're stressed and the existing fish experience a little stress as they adjust to cohabitation with their new pals. As long as you maintain a good water change schedule, feed your fish good food, and practice good husbandry, which it sounds like you do - I wouldn't worry.
mgeorges is offline  
 
post #4 of 7 (permalink) Old 05-01-2018, 09:30 PM
Wannabe Guru
 
lksdrinker's Avatar
 
PTrader: (8/100%)
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: NY; LETS GO METS
Posts: 1,875
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rnasty View Post
My method - don't medicate unless you have to. If they are able to fight it off on their own it's better to do it that way
Not a bad idea in theory; except you wont know if a fish can fight it off on their own until either survives or dies! Meds get a bad wrap in this hobby. I personally see nothing wrong with dosing meds so long as you can accurately diagnose an issue and treat accordingly. I think the big problem lies in the inability to really diagnose most issues we encounter in the hobby.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mgeorges View Post
I've never had to medicate for Ich. As new fish are added, they're stressed and the existing fish experience a little stress as they adjust to cohabitation with their new pals. As long as you maintain a good water change schedule, feed your fish good food, and practice good husbandry, which it sounds like you do - I wouldn't worry.
Besides the possibility of fish getting stressed when new fish are added to a tank; new fish can also bring new disease with them. Part of good husbandry practice is monitoring the health of your fish and treating (with or without meds) as necessary. So a little worry on the part of the OP is warranted if his previously healthy fish are showing signs of ich after adding in new fish to the mix.

I've dealt with ich plenty of times through the years. Never did have much luck using meds for ich. But heat treatments have proven to be successful for me (I raise tank temps to 90 degrees or more; and leave it that warm for another 10 days after the last ich spot is visible).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Keating1 View Post
I acquired 10 blue neon rainbow fish last week on Saturday. On Sunday evening I noticed one of my rummy nose had two ich spots on the fins. The next morning, they were gone. Over the past week a few fish have gotten ich spots here and there, never more than two spots per fish, but within a few hours the spots disappear. I’ve counted a total of 7 spots. I raised the aquarium temp up to 82 in anticipation of a full tank breakout, but that has not materialized. I have the following fish:

10 Rummy Nose

10 Blue Neon Rainbows

12 Pigmy Cory’s

4 Julian Cory’s

4 Kuli Loach’s

3 Otos

1 Marble Hatchet

Only the Rummy Nose and Rainbows have shown ich spots.

All fish are very healthy, get a variety of food, flake, frozen and live. The tank gets 50% WC once a week. Water parameters are excellent. No fish are showing signs of distress.

I’ve research and found out that if fish survive a ich infection they can develop an immune response and become resistant to re-infection. I’m thinking if the fish are slowing getting ich and able to fight it off, their immunity would be a benefit to their long-term health.

I picked up some SeaChem MetroPlex today for medication, but as of now no fish have any ich spots. Should I go forward with treatment or wait this out and see what happens? If I had multiple fish with ich and it remained for longer that 24 hours I would start immediately. Last night I counted two spots total. As of this morning no ich is present on any fish, so they’ve been ich free for at least 12 hours.

Also, yes, I just learned the benefits of a quarantine tank!! Also, I've researched and I'm familiar with ich's life cycle.

Any recommendations would be appreciated.
Are you positive what you saw is ich? I've never seen a fish with visible ich spots that was able to beat it in a matter of hours. If you are familiar with the life cycle then you understand that the entire cycle is roughly a week or so at most aquarium temps. Starts as white spots on the fish as it feeds off of the fish. Then becomes "free swimming" for lack of a better term and attaches to substrate and other things in the tank where it then divides and looks for a host again. Seems unlikely that you brought ich infected fish on one day and less than 24 hours later noticed ich spots on previously healthy fish and then back to healthy 24 hours later again. Especially at the temps you mentioned (being somewhere below 82 before you noticed).
Deanna and Deanna like this.

Rich's Fishes
Curator of an ever growing fishroom that currently houses 30 different tanks. Most full of at least water....some even have fish!
lksdrinker is offline  
post #5 of 7 (permalink) Old 05-01-2018, 10:08 PM Thread Starter
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
Ken Keating1's Avatar
 
PTrader: (3/100%)
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 771
@Iksdrinker : Without actually looking at the white dot under the microscope, for me it's hard to say for sure it was ich as I've never seen it before in person on a live fish. On all seven dots, they were just that, round white dots, that look like the ones I see on the internet for ich. They were not CO2 or 02 bubbles. I thoughtit was odd they disappeared so quickly. The dots never moved while on the fish. I tried taking photos, but the Rummy Nose never slowed down such that I could get a clear photo. The best photos I could get are below. The white dot is right behind the eye.







I have not seen any more dots since Saturday night. So dot free for three days.
pibbles101 and pibbles101 like this.
Ken Keating1 is offline  
post #6 of 7 (permalink) Old 05-02-2018, 12:54 AM
Wannabe Guru
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: PA
Posts: 1,226
I tend to agree with @lksdrinker: if something substantial appears, it might be a good idea to treat just in case. First, be sure water params, temp and cleaning methods are good so fish are happy. Ich shouldn't go away like that, but there are other parasitic diseases that may go underground after a brief surface appearance, especially when they appear in the gill area.

First, a disclaimer: I haven't had a disease in about a decade, which I attribute to a high-end UVS, plus other typical good things, so my methods are at least ten-years old.

I found PraziPro to be the best overall parasitic worm killer. Seachems ParaGuard is also an excellent ich/parasite killer. I dose PraziPro annually as a 'worming' function. I don't follow the dosing recommendation. I bring a hammer down on the life cycles of parasites. Here is what I do, if you want to try it:

Day 1: Remove carbon/Purigen and filter pads. Clean sponge for maximum water flow. Turn UV
sterilizer off. Do a 50% water change by vacuuming of substrate surface, then add PraziPro.
Day 2 to 4 (3 days): Do nothing
Day 5: 50% water change by vacuuming of substrate surface then add another dose of PraziPro.
Day 6 to 8 (3 days): Do nothing
Day 9: 50% water change by vacuuming of substrate surface then add another dose of PraziPro.
Day 10 to 12 (3 days): Do nothing
Day 13: 50% water change, add carbon/Purigen, filter media and replace sponge filter.

Sterilize equipment in a 1:4 bleach:water mixture.

Last edited by Deanna; 05-02-2018 at 01:13 AM. Reason: add
Deanna is offline  
post #7 of 7 (permalink) Old 05-02-2018, 01:50 AM Thread Starter
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
Ken Keating1's Avatar
 
PTrader: (3/100%)
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 771
@Deanna: I like your recommendation for annual worm eradication, I've always wondered about parasitic worm control and it could be too late when you find out your fish have it. I'll give that a try, is sounds like a good preventative approach.

I've been spending about 10 minutes in the morning and 10 in the evening looking at each fish with a large 6" diameter magnifying glass. So far nothing, so that's good. If one fish showed ich for more than 24 hours I'd start dosing immediately, but with 44 fish showing no signs for the past three days I think I'm going to hold off. Mainly I'd prefer to have them get a slight case of ich, fend it off, and acquire some immunity. The funny thing about the magnifying glass is they hid the 1st couple of times I brought it out, but after feeding them right after the inspection, they've associated it with food, and now they come right up to the front glass for inspection. They're getting well trained!

I like everyone's suggestions, it gives me more insight into what I may or may not be getting myself into.
Deanna and Deanna like this.
Ken Keating1 is offline  
Reply

Tags
None

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Planted Tank Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome