Painting the plywood cabinet from inside - The Planted Tank Forum
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post #1 of 24 (permalink) Old 02-19-2015, 05:54 PM Thread Starter
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Painting the plywood cabinet from inside

Hey guys,

I recently bought this cabinet from AFA. It doesn't have any paint on the inside. I am thinking it would be a good idea to have some kind of a layer on the bare plywood.
What are my options? Is there any kind of spray can that I can buy and spray? I am hesitant to do the mixing and painting with a brush but if that's the only option, I will do it.
What do you think? Is it really important to do this or not?


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post #2 of 24 (permalink) Old 02-19-2015, 06:00 PM
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Sealing the interior would be a good idea. Polyurethane is always a good option and it wont destroy the beauty of the wood. I generally apply it in a 3 to 1 mixture with mineral spirits with a rag and repeat until smooth.

If your heart is set on paint, that is also fine. My only concern is the finish that is already on the stands interior. If its bare plywood it should adhere fine, but if it isn't it will need to be sanded.

Bump: Another option: find a liner to put in the bottom of the stand. I bought some cork with adhesive on the back and cut it to shape my stands bottom. Looks nice and keeps water off.

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post #3 of 24 (permalink) Old 02-19-2015, 06:06 PM
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http://www.thepaintstore.com/Zinsser...er_p/01008.htm
I painted my shelf and walls with this then sealed AGAIN with a water based poly(clear)
http://www.lowes.com/pd_45889-24-633...7C1&facetInfo=

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post #4 of 24 (permalink) Old 02-19-2015, 06:50 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by natebuchholz View Post
Sealing the interior would be a good idea. Polyurethane is always a good option and it wont destroy the beauty of the wood. I generally apply it in a 3 to 1 mixture with mineral spirits with a rag and repeat until smooth.

If your heart is set on paint, that is also fine. My only concern is the finish that is already on the stands interior. If its bare plywood it should adhere fine, but if it isn't it will need to be sanded.

Bump: Another option: find a liner to put in the bottom of the stand. I bought some cork with adhesive on the back and cut it to shape my stands bottom. Looks nice and keeps water off.
Cork with adhesive. I am very unlucky when it comes to finding stuff like this. LOL. I go to home depot or lowes and they say "sorry!".
Yeah, it's bare plywood inside the cabinet. I like the polyurethane sounds like a good idea. Would it be waterproof?
Or would the paint be an "Easy" option? I can just buy the can of paint and spray it, right?

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post #5 of 24 (permalink) Old 02-19-2015, 07:52 PM
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The cork can be found on amazon.

Paint and poly do the same thing and can be applied in the same way. They both are sealing the pores of the wood so it is more water resistant (keyword). Poly is better at resisting water but it will take several coats. You could also do both like mentioned above and paint the finish then seal it with poly.

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post #6 of 24 (permalink) Old 02-19-2015, 08:25 PM
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I find it hard to believe the plywood has no protective coating.
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post #7 of 24 (permalink) Old 02-19-2015, 08:42 PM
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I find it hard to believe the plywood has no protective coating.
Plywood is just a composite material made of bits of wood and glue. If not sealed properly it will warp.

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post #8 of 24 (permalink) Old 02-19-2015, 08:59 PM
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Most cabinet makers use prefinished plywood for their interiors these days. Most of these clear acrylic finished look just like unfinished wood but they protect it very well.
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post #9 of 24 (permalink) Old 02-19-2015, 09:03 PM
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I respectfully disagree.

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post #10 of 24 (permalink) Old 02-20-2015, 01:47 AM
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I respectfully disagree.
You can disagree but Bruce is right. A good carpenter, or factory will generally finish both sides. Why? So the wood would be less likely to warp. If only one side is finished the other side will absorb moisture and can lead to many problems. Even with plywood. I seal all my furniture both sides whenever possible. Old school would have been to spray it with lacquer both sides. That said I do have an antique china cabinet that isn't sealed both sides and it's solid wood. Why no trouble? Simple. It's the wood itself. Old wood is slow growth and inherently more stable.

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post #11 of 24 (permalink) Old 02-20-2015, 02:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraphicGr8s View Post
You can disagree but Bruce is right. A good carpenter, or factory will generally finish both sides. Why? So the wood would be less likely to warp. If only one side is finished the other side will absorb moisture and can lead to many problems. Even with plywood. I seal all my furniture both sides whenever possible. Old school would have been to spray it with lacquer both sides. That said I do have an antique china cabinet that isn't sealed both sides and it's solid wood. Why no trouble? Simple. It's the wood itself. Old wood is slow growth and inherently more stable.
I will respectfully disagree again!
All six sides not both for any real custom builder.
As with any disease in our tanks ; we can only treat what we know.
"Spauling" (moisture pushing finishes off from behind{only sealed on one side} is common.
Sealing the edges reduces(does not eliminate) checking and end cracks.
Tit for tat.Anybody know what "anchor seal" is?
Penny pinchers aren't allowing any manufacturer to go 1 single extra step the clearly "less then informed " public will recognize.
It is not sealed by manufacturer IMO.
Is the cabinet veneered or real hard wood?

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post #12 of 24 (permalink) Old 02-20-2015, 03:31 AM
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I used killz primer on the inside of my stand and have been very happy with the durability of it. I would suggest paint and brush before a spray can. Preventing overspray on finished wood is a b$&@:;!
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post #13 of 24 (permalink) Old 02-20-2015, 03:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coralbandit View Post
I will respectfully disagree again!
All six sides not both for any real custom builder.
As with any disease in our tanks ; we can only treat what we know.
"Spauling" (moisture pushing finishes off from behind{only sealed on one side} is common.
Sealing the edges reduces(does not eliminate) checking and end cracks.
Tit for tat.Anybody know what "anchor seal" is?
Penny pinchers aren't allowing any manufacturer to go 1 single extra step the clearly "less then informed " public will recognize.
It is not sealed by manufacturer IMO.
Is the cabinet veneered or real hard wood?
In most cases if your finishing a case you do in fact seal all six surfaces. Even those not exposed. However we generally refer to "both sides" to really mean all exposed surfaces. For example a simple cabinet. You have the front, top bottom and sides. The face frame will be sealed on the front, both edges and the endgrain since each of those surfaces are exposed. Now on the rails you can only seal the edge and face grain. Not true. The end grain is sealed by the glue you used to join it to the stiles. Holds true for most all pieces used in a case. I run up to six coats on the visible surfaces with only 3 on interiors. Drawers I use prefinished and then run 2 coats on cut surfaces.
Veneer? I use the good stuff on the visible and a cheap on the hidden. Then seal.

I don't think you have the right term for spall. Their is also spalted woods but that involves fungi. Spalting is also used for the heating of concrete to give a rough edge to it.

Anchor seal is generally referring to a brand name but is used to seal endgrain on fresh lumber to prevent checking and splitting.

Bump:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy27012 View Post
I used killz primer on the inside of my stand and have been very happy with the durability of it. I would suggest paint and brush before a spray can. Preventing overspray on finished wood is a b$&@:;!
Kilz is a decent product. So is Zinsser. So is basic shellac. Plus shellac is food safe. They use it to coat many of the drugs we take. Especially aspirin. Once the denatured alcohol evaps it's safe. Not bad for the turd of a bug. And IIRC Zinsser had/has exclusive rights on importing it. Plus it also seals between different types of finishes. Use it to put oil/alkyd over waterbase and vise versa.

Sumer, it just dawned on me why that cabinet looked odd. The top and bottom rails are suppose to be between the stiles. This has them the opposite. That's professionally built?

Dilution is the solution for the pollution.
Quote me as saying I was misquoted.
Once you get rid of integrity the rest is a piece of cake.
Here's to our wives and sweethearts - may they never meet.
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Last edited by GraphicGr8s; 02-20-2015 at 04:04 AM. Reason: added
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post #14 of 24 (permalink) Old 02-20-2015, 02:03 PM Thread Starter
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Yeah I bought it from aqua forest. This is what they sell with a 90-p these days. It's a commercial product. It's not the best solution in the world but I have heard good things about it from the people who have been using it for 2-3 years now.
Here are some more photos. I don't understand a b or c of carpentry. I didn't want to pay $500 for that ADA steel stand and that's why I bought this.





So from what I understand, here's what I'd do: First, paint two coats of varnish on it. Then use a pray paint can to paint over it. I would like to have it white in color. Would make it easier to spot things.

Bump: Also, by touching the plywood, it doesn't feel like a normal plywood. It's smoother than the plywood I have seen at home depot.

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post #15 of 24 (permalink) Old 02-20-2015, 02:16 PM
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You don't need to varnish it in order to paint it. You need to sand it lightly then you can paint it. Remove all the dust, apply a layer of paint. Sand it remove all the dust apply a layer of paint. A good primer will help but these days much paint is self priming.

If you pour a little water on it and leave it for 10 minutes you will be able to tell if the water penetrates the plywood. If not then it already has a finish on it. If that is the case you really don't need to do anything to it.
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