Plumbing for easier refills - The Planted Tank Forum
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post #1 of 32 (permalink) Old 05-23-2014, 08:56 PM Thread Starter
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Plumbing for easier refills

My 125 is sitting next to the bathroom, separated by a wall to the right. I am wondering how difficult it would be to split that hold and cold line, drill a hole in the wall so as to fill the tank much easier than getting hoses out. I also have a plan for a drain, but that seems much simpler as there is a good spot to drop to the basement.

Any good resources or tips out there other than just going to Home Depot and asking someone there?


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post #2 of 32 (permalink) Old 05-23-2014, 09:05 PM
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It shouldn't be hard to tap off that line but it would depend on what kind of pipes you have back there. Are they copper or that flex PVC? May be worth having a pro do it though so you aren't worried about messing it up and having a leak in your wall.
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post #3 of 32 (permalink) Old 05-23-2014, 09:41 PM
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Can we probe the situation a bit? Much depends on what and where you have in the way of plumbing but even more depends on your experience and willingness.
Does this wall to the right have pipes in it? Sometimes a simple saddle valve will get it done.
What kind of plumbing do you have? Plastic, copper, iron? Each reguires different methods and materials.
Do you know where/how to shut off the water and drain the pipes? This is often not hard but only if you know .
Since you have a basement, have you looked if it open ceiling below the tank? It is often easier to go across below than to work inside walls even though it may be further .
I'm sure there are plenty who can advise you but this is an area where one does need to think it through first to get the best result.
This is not meant to scare you off but to start the thinking it through!

A vanity backing to the tank wall would be super nice????

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post #4 of 32 (permalink) Old 05-23-2014, 09:56 PM Thread Starter
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I will take some pictures so you can visualize better. The reason I am thinking about going through the wall is because the vanity cabinet in the bathroom is right next to the tank on the other side of the wall. It would be fairly easy I believe to simply split the line running to the sink and run it through the wall. Directly under the tank is a very large and accessible crawl space. I would simply run the drain to a floor drain in the basement similarly to the one running from the water heater.

I believe it is copper, but I need to look at it again. I have no experience soldering, but have done enough DIY projects that I would feel comfortable and be willing to learn what I need to do.


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post #5 of 32 (permalink) Old 05-23-2014, 10:47 PM
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Very good! If the vanity backs to the wall that has the tank on the other side, this might work very easy. under the lavatory in the bath, there will be some type of tubing connecting the pipe in the wall to the bottom of the faucet. Low tech, low level way might be to cut this tubing, add a tee fitting and bring the water to the tank on simple tubing. A little more "high tech" but not much is using a saddle valve on a pipe if it is plastic or copper. Simple in that you don't need to cut the main pipe and put it back together. Used on icemakers and such? Rather than run around to the bath to control the water, adding some type cutoff at the tank end would be nice.
Several options and definitely possible to do. It just depends on what is available and how it suits your situation. Sounds like something that we can talk you through without any big bumps!
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post #6 of 32 (permalink) Old 05-23-2014, 11:38 PM Thread Starter
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This is the situation. I don't know a ton about plumbing, but I am not afraid of getting my hands dirty.


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post #7 of 32 (permalink) Old 05-23-2014, 11:42 PM
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If it is copper u may want to have a professional do it. Depending on your water pressure. It is possible for water flowing through pipe too fast and creating pin holes in copper line eventually, water is a powerful force just look what it did to the grand canyon. I work in a field where I've seen it happen. The concern is water flow more so than pressure( erosion ). It depends on the application. as a rule of thumb the water line should not shoot water more than 8 feet. It is possible to do ur self but it is best to do properly.

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post #8 of 32 (permalink) Old 05-24-2014, 12:21 AM
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It's pretty simple. It appears that you have a compression valve not a sweated one. I'd change the valve out for a 2 port. One goes to the sink the other to the tank.
You do need to cut the pipe however. The ferule has compressed around that pipe and more than likely is part of it.

Another idea would be to use a saddle valve on the sink side of the valve and put some 1/4" flex and run that through the wall. Then you don't need to worry about the valve being installed wrong.

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post #9 of 32 (permalink) Old 05-24-2014, 12:23 AM
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Looks like as good as you could get for ease of doing this!
You know where/how to turn off the water and let it drain? Ask before cutting , if not!!!
With a house this new, things are much more reliable and somewhat easier. My suggestions would pretty much match your idea of just punching a hole through the wall under the vanity to tie into the line. Decision for you to make is whether your incoming water will need to be from hot and cold or is cold okay for adding direct to the tank? Gets down to using what may be cold water which has to be added a bit more carefully so not to give them a chill or more work to add a hot and cold with a mixing valve setup to give you warmer water.
There are a couple ways to tap these lines. You might need to do some checking on what is handy for you to find but this would be my thoughts.
Take the compression fitting off at the pipe coming out of the floor, replace the current cutoff with a cutoof like this:
http://www.lowes.com/pd_272815-143-K...7C1&facetInfo=
I would then use the existing copper to go up to the faucet or I might upgrade slightly to a braided flexible tube. I got to admit, I'm getting spoiled and don't like messing with copper tubing. But it will cost you $10! your decision. From the second outlet to the tank is much the same decision. Some type of tubing through the wall and a cutoff at the end to control it. For this tube there is a real nice (expensive?) braided tube that is great and will give you much comfort knowing it will not break. They can be had in like 6 foot length. They might be found around the icemaker supplies.

Second somewhat harder but also cheaper is cutting the supply tube above the cutoff and add a tee in the copper tubing. Cut the tube, put in the tee involves two compression fitting and easing the tubing back to fit the cutoff in. Not bad work if done carefully so the copper doesn't kink when moving it.

Draining to down below sounds like it's good.

Give it a bit of study and yell if it needs other ideas?
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post #10 of 32 (permalink) Old 05-24-2014, 05:37 AM Thread Starter
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Thank you all for the help on this! I have a neighbor that is remodeling his bathroom and does contracting (mainly floors) for a living, so I am going to solicit some advise from him as well.

I will try to document with photos how I end up doing all this...


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post #11 of 32 (permalink) Old 05-24-2014, 02:38 PM
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Sounds good. It is a wise move to not take the first advise you get but cross-check things! Just keep in mind that this is not really a big item. You probably know this already but don't let it build into a situation where you are needing a contractor. Depends on the neighbor of course?
Best of luck and keep it posted?
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post #12 of 32 (permalink) Old 05-24-2014, 04:11 PM
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How are you draining your tank?

If you're doing some pipe cutting, might as well get yourself in inline carbon block filter for the water too. You'll never need to declor again. Go crazy. You'll need to set it up so you can easily change the carbon filter of course.
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post #13 of 32 (permalink) Old 05-29-2014, 05:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mistergreen View Post
How are you draining your tank?

If you're doing some pipe cutting, might as well get yourself in inline carbon block filter for the water too. You'll never need to declor again. Go crazy. You'll need to set it up so you can easily change the carbon filter of course.
That sounds interesting. Would it possible to setup a system with a garden hose connector on the end for filling? What would be a good smallish carbon block filter to use?
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post #14 of 32 (permalink) Old 05-29-2014, 05:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gus6464 View Post
That sounds interesting. Would it possible to setup a system with a garden hose connector on the end for filling? What would be a good smallish carbon block filter to use?
check your hardware store. The cheapest is one from Dupont for $60. It should last you awhile if using it only for the aquarium. Several months if you use for the whole house.

It'll clean any nasties in your tap water like ammonia or phosphates in addition to chlorine/chloramine.
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post #15 of 32 (permalink) Old 05-29-2014, 05:59 PM Thread Starter
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Does Carbon remove choir amine as well? I am trying to keep it as simple as possible, but this does sound like a good idea.


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