Sump plans I would like an opinion - The Planted Tank Forum
 
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post #1 of 8 (permalink) Old 03-05-2008, 09:41 PM Thread Starter
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Sump plans I would like an opinion

Hi there,

here are the plans for my sump would like opinions also when co2 is lost is it lost through movement in general or just surface movement?

Regards Darren

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post #2 of 8 (permalink) Old 03-05-2008, 10:03 PM
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Its usually lost at the intake due to massive turbulence and splashing over the check walls. Covering the sump may help to minimize this. I have seen great success with sumps on planted tanks.

Setup looks fine to me. Good luck with it!


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post #3 of 8 (permalink) Old 03-06-2008, 02:13 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks glenn, the fact that co2 is last in the sump turbulance should be minimal hopefully still dont know what to pump with dont want to drill holes...
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post #4 of 8 (permalink) Old 03-06-2008, 02:56 AM
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Well, its not just where the reactor is, remember, the whole idea is to dissolve CO2 into the water column throughout. So, in essence, the water coming from the tank has CO2 that you want to maintain. Continually injecting it can help supplement this, but is really a waste. So like I said, minimizing turbulence will not only minimize outgasing, but can also help eliminate a variable of not sustaining adequate levels.

As far as pumps, why drill? Just get a submersible pump... I have no experience here with picking these pumps as far as what is good and what isn't. But there are plenty out there that can go either way!

Example: http://www.drsfostersmith.com/produc...49&pcatid=9849

The biggest complaint I have heard (or read for that rather) is sometimes there is considerable heat transfer from the pump that can effect the temperatures in the tanks. Now, again, i have no experience here, so I will defer this topic to someone else, but I figured I could at least give you some info to start researching with.

Good luck with this and keep us posted on your progress!


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post #5 of 8 (permalink) Old 03-06-2008, 03:10 AM
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You might want to place your bioballs last as it is the bio media and mechanical ( pads) and chemical first. This will make your scheduled maint farther apart. I was a hard core reefer for yrs. I always had Mechanical then chemical and finally bio.

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post #6 of 8 (permalink) Old 03-06-2008, 04:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by duzzy View Post
Hi there,

here are the plans for my sump would like opinions also when co2 is lost is it lost through movement in general or just surface movement?

Regards Darren
* Lay the heater flat so that a no time can the pump pull more that heater is submerged by.
* The CO2 reactor (compressed) goes after the return pump ie "Rex reactor" style. You will achieve better results and less noise should a bubble make it to the pump.

Moved to Tucson.
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post #7 of 8 (permalink) Old 03-06-2008, 10:08 PM
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Looks ok. Bio-balls aren't really needed in a medium to heavily planted tank, but shouldn't hurt anything. I only have mechanical filtration in my sump. I'll add in chemical after I dose meds, but I don't leave it in all the time.

Laying the heater flat is a good idea to keep it fully submersed all the time. Most people put their CO2 reactor in the return line after the pump. Having a submerged pump in the sump is the easy way to go, but you can go external as well.


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post #8 of 8 (permalink) Old 03-07-2008, 07:44 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks all this is a whole new world, great tip on the heater....
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