diy co2 quick question - The Planted Tank Forum
 
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post #1 of 10 (permalink) Old 02-16-2014, 08:19 AM Thread Starter
Ras
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diy co2 quick question

any tips on how to pour out the liquid while leaving the yeast
I seem to fail every time. the second i tip the bottle the yeast gunk clouds into the water instead of staying settled on the bottom
im using wine yeast btw
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post #2 of 10 (permalink) Old 02-16-2014, 02:16 PM
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I use a fresh batch of yeast each time. Some articles I read in the past suggested cleaning the bottles really well with HOT water and using new/fresh yeast..works for me. I'm not using expensive yeast though.
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post #3 of 10 (permalink) Old 02-16-2014, 02:57 PM
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I do the same as TekWarren. When I refill a bottle I will empty and rinse clean with hot water first (2 litre plastic soda bottle). Then ~2 cups sugar, 1 tsp baking soda before I fill it nearly 3/4 full with warm water, cap it and shake it until everything dissolves. While I'm doing all of that, I'll have a separate bowl with a bit of warm water, a pinch of sugar and half a teaspoon of brewers yeast sitting for about 10 mins (vigorously stirring with a fork every couple minutes) to activate the yeast. Once the sugar water is prepared and well dissolved I just pour the yeast mix on top, let it sit open for another 10 mins or so before I install it back into my system. This process produces co2 quickly and lasts 4+ weeks. I swap each bottle at the 2 or 3 week mark depending on the setup. No need to try and save the sugar that settles IME - fresh and clean everytime is the way to go.
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post #4 of 10 (permalink) Old 02-16-2014, 06:24 PM Thread Starter
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but the whole point of using alcohol resistant yeast is because it doesnt die after use
seems to be a waste and pointless to use beer or wine yeast and then dump it out each time
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post #5 of 10 (permalink) Old 02-16-2014, 09:32 PM
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Just pour carefully. If you're really concerned with keeping yeast you can have a separate container of sugar water (less sugar that your reactor) and put your yeast in there. It will keep as a culture and you just refill your reactor from it. Top off with more sugar water.
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post #6 of 10 (permalink) Old 02-16-2014, 09:51 PM
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I brew / make wine for a living. I know more about yeast replication and stability than your average citizen. You can reuse a wine or brewers yeast indefinitely. The only bad thing that can happen is yeast mutation which for DIY CO2 production means nothing. It can effect the flavor the yeast produces in beer and wine. To separate the yeast from solution for re pitching, put the old bottle in the fridge for 12 - 24 hrs. The yeast will fall out of solution and cake at the bottom of the bottle. Carefully pour the liquid out of the bottle leaving the yeast cake at the bottom. Add more sugar solution. Rinse and repeat indefinitely. This is called "yeast washing". Do a youtube search for detailed instructions. It can also be called "cold crashing" but that can also refer to something completely different... let me know if you have any other yeast related questions.

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post #7 of 10 (permalink) Old 02-16-2014, 09:59 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GitMoe View Post
I brew / make wine for a living. I know more about yeast replication and stability than your average citizen. You can reuse a wine or brewers yeast indefinitely. The only bad thing that can happen is yeast mutation which for DIY CO2 production means nothing. It can effect the flavor the yeast produces in beer and wine. To separate the yeast from solution for re pitching, put the old bottle in the fridge for 12 - 24 hrs. The yeast will fall out of solution and cake at the bottom of the bottle. Carefully pour the liquid out of the bottle leaving the yeast cake at the bottom. Add more sugar solution. Rinse and repeat indefinitely. This is called "yeast washing". Do a youtube search for detailed instructions. It can also be called "cold crashing" but that can also refer to something completely different... let me know if you have any other yeast related questions.

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exactly what I was looking for
thank you!
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post #8 of 10 (permalink) Old 02-17-2014, 01:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ras View Post
but the whole point of using alcohol resistant yeast is because it doesnt die after use
seems to be a waste and pointless to use beer or wine yeast and then dump it out each time

I use off the shelf grocery store yeast, it's cheap and works. In a DIY setup you want consistency otherwise prepare for battle with BBA. Maybe you can pull off reusing yeast but I couldn't. I know exactly how much works for me, how long it lasts, and that the output is going to be enough to be beneficial. When pouring off the alcohol (used sugar water) you are going to be constantly changing the size of the yeast colony which will in turn affect your output and make it irregular.
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post #9 of 10 (permalink) Old 02-17-2014, 04:35 PM
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Cooling it will help the yeast floculate out of solution and settle to the bottom.
A fresh sugar solution is going to be aerobic, yeast multiply by cell division in the presence of oxygen and food (sugar). The small amount lost from pouring off the liquid (after cooling) will quickly be replaced.
When the solution goes anerobic (no oxygen) they shift their mode of respiration and stop putting energy into reproduction. This is the state we are ultimately looking for because this is when they begin producing large amounts of co2.

By reusing yeast, you have a large population where the majority of the yeast has not yet gone into what is basically a hibernation phase, or similar to what brine shrimp eggs do (waiting for ideal conditions to reanimate). They yeast will start chowing down immediately as long as you don't shock them with solution that is too warm.
If you are saving yeast, you can get two containers going so you can truley wash the yeast keeping the other in the fridge until you need to get it ready right before you take the other one off line.

I've found bread yeast simple enough to use. I should break out the hydrometer and see how much alcohol it is actually withstanding and how much of the sugar it is actually consuming.
I pour out the liquid and leave some of the settled yeast behind and pour some new yeast on top. It starts up quicker for me. I get CO2 within a couple of hours. I'm not concerned about the flavors in the final product, so a bacterial infection (wild yeast or bacteria that is not of the desired strain) is of no concern. A hot water rinse of the bottle is of little use to prevent that anyway. If it smells off when I dump it out or there is a drop in production, I'll start fresh and sanitize the bottle.

I usually feel kind of guilty using the quick reply... my replies are rarely quick.
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post #10 of 10 (permalink) Old 02-17-2014, 04:55 PM
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Quote:
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...I should break out the hydrometer and see how much alcohol it is actually withstanding and how much of the sugar it is actually consuming.
Bakers yeast should crap out around 4-5% so very low attenuation. I don't know what the OG of 1c sugar in 2c water is (I don't feel like doing the math) but I imagine it's extremely high capable of producing 15%+ with full attenuation. A champagne yeast would be best suited for those conditions. I'd be really interested to see the OG and FG of the solution. Not super relevant but interesting. People using bakers yeast could just be wasting sugar.
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