Cheap Easy Pressure Treated Aquarium Stands - pictue heavy - The Planted Tank Forum
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post #1 of 21 (permalink) Old 02-14-2014, 01:30 AM Thread Starter
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Cheap Easy Pressure Treated Aquarium Stands - pictue heavy

I use this design for different size Stands/Tables

I made this double stand that holds up to 2 20/29 gal tanks for under $25
32 inch wide, 16.5 inch deep, 31 inch tall

The tank on the bottom shelf is a 20 gal high. Top can easily hod a 29 gal or even a 36 gal bow-front.


I use
2 - 5/4 x 6 x 12 decking boards - $5.77 each
2 - 2 x 4 x 8 pressure treated - $2.97 each
64 2 1/2 in decking screws - $.10 each
total $24.28 plus tax

so here is my basic design for legs can be used for multiple size stands
2 x 4 legs sandwiched between decking boards at top and 2 x 4s at bottom you can alter the design to use either decking or 2x4 at both top and bottom. Based on what size your building and how it works out with "extra" length left on top/shelf boards









once put together the legs will stand on their own


Then add the bottom shelf. On this because it in not very deep I rain one board the entire length in the bottom and front and back boards only up to the legs. On bigger stands I run shelf boards only the full length behind the legs.


Then add the top boards


I did the same basic design on the stand for my 75 gal. This one is 6 feet wide (plus 6 inch add on shelf) by 24 in deep by 32 inch tall. Bigger than needed for the tank - has a 10 gal on it also. It has the same style legs with an extra set in the middle. Shelf is higher off the ground to allow for 2 storage selves. This was made for about $60


Hope this helps anyone looking for a cheap heavy weight stand.

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Last edited by Lynrem; 02-14-2014 at 01:54 AM. Reason: added more detail
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post #2 of 21 (permalink) Old 02-14-2014, 01:52 AM
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Pressure treated lumber is never a good idea for interior projects. Especially if you have pets and children. The wood is treated. With toxic fluids. In other words POISON.

Dilution is the solution for the pollution.
Quote me as saying I was misquoted.
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post #3 of 21 (permalink) Old 02-14-2014, 02:13 AM Thread Starter
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If your really worried about it the same design can be use with not treated lumber. However the reality of is the new pressure treated lumber is not that toxic.

Quote:
In 2004 the US Environmental Protection Agency banned the use of CCA to preserve wood for residential use. An exception is that it can still be used for permanent wood foundations. And CCA-treated lumber is still available for industrial uses. New EPA-approved chemicals without arsenic have replaced CCA for home and garden use.

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post #4 of 21 (permalink) Old 02-14-2014, 02:36 AM
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I'm not worried about PT at all. I will never use it for an indoor project since it is toxic. I use it where it is necessary and only there. This ACQ hasn't been around long and we still don't know the long term effects.
http://treatedwood.com/uploads/Preserve_Plus_MSDS.pdf
Quote:
Since it contains high levels of copper, ACQ-treated timber is five times more corrosive to common steel. It is necessary to use double-galvanized[clarification needed] or stainless steel fasteners in ACQ timber. Use of fasteners meeting or exceeding requirements for ASTM A 153 Class D meet the added requirements for fastener durability. The U.S. began mandating the use of non-arsenic containing wood preservatives for virtually all residential use timber in 2004.
Quote:
Copper is a highly corrosive substance, this combined with the alkaline can make for a large degree of skin irritation when in contact with not only the wood dust, but also prolonged skin exposure to the wood itself. The Boric Acid used to temper the wood during treatment can be absorbed into the skin causing serious sensitivities and allergic reactions. Monoethanolamine is another chemical used in the treatment of ACQ wood which can be absorbed through the skin and cause highly corrosive reactions. Didecyldimethylammonium chloride is a chemical used in the Quaternary Ammonium Compounds which has shown to be permanently harmful to both the eyes and skin of animals due to its caustic nature.

Dilution is the solution for the pollution.
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post #5 of 21 (permalink) Old 02-14-2014, 03:16 AM
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Since the wood is not warped, I will assume it is less than six months old at this point.
Treated lumber is quite heavy, that is true. But the reason it is heavy is because it is still wet. When it dries it twists and warps like the picnic tables in parks.
Sorry. Not a good plan.
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post #6 of 21 (permalink) Old 02-14-2014, 05:16 AM
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In addition to the mis-use of pressure treated wood, you need a piece of thin plywood across the back for racking resistance. If someone bumps the tank full of water at the end, a stand designed like that can collapse.

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post #7 of 21 (permalink) Old 02-14-2014, 01:46 PM
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So what you have here is a poorly designed stand that could potentially make you sick every time you touch it. Not bad for under $25.00

Dilution is the solution for the pollution.
Quote me as saying I was misquoted.
Once you get rid of integrity the rest is a piece of cake.
Here's to our wives and sweethearts - may they never meet.
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post #8 of 21 (permalink) Old 02-14-2014, 11:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PlantedRich View Post
Since the wood is not warped, I will assume it is less than six months old at this point.
Treated lumber is quite heavy, that is true. But the reason it is heavy is because it is still wet. When it dries it twists and warps like the picnic tables in parks.
Sorry. Not a good plan.
Yep, personally I ate pressure treated..Much of it does weird things after drying completely..

I could see seasoning it inside for a year, picking out whats not ruined by warping (most will be, ) Then painting it
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post #9 of 21 (permalink) Old 02-14-2014, 11:58 PM
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They are one type lumber that is often kept banded until one stack is sold. Otherwise they tend to , " dance out of the yard".
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post #10 of 21 (permalink) Old 02-15-2014, 01:14 AM
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there is another thread in this section about industrial style stands, I would check that out if youre looking for a quick easy stand design similar to what you have here...

here is the link:
https://www.plantedtank.net/forums/sh...ght=industrial

pretty simple design and very nice looking
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post #11 of 21 (permalink) Old 02-15-2014, 09:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraphicGr8s View Post
So what you have here is a poorly designed stand that could potentially make you sick every time you touch it. Not bad for under $25.00
How many people do you know that get sick every time they go out on their deck? Seriously you gotta think before fear mongering. The chances of someone getting sick because they built an aquarium stand out of treated wood are probably lower than what people normally use it for which is deck and picnic tables that they eat on and sun bath on.

Lets also discuss warping since people made a big deal out of it. Sure any wood over time can warp. But the worst warping happens because of differences in moisture and that can just as easily happen on kiln dried lumber. Because if you are using it on an aquarium what do you think is going to happen? It will receive uneven attack from moisture. But that doesn't stop people because a properly secured piece of lumber of anytype will be braced and screwed together such that it will resist warping.

Most of the aquarium stand I have seen over the years have mold issues, often black mold but you don't see people freaking out about that but that can actually mess you up. I know multiple people who have had serious health issues due to black mold, I don't know anyone who was harmed by treated lumber.

The real issue here is just that treated lumber is more expensive so unless its scrap laying around most people wont pay extra money to build anything indoors out of treated lumber.
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post #12 of 21 (permalink) Old 02-15-2014, 12:49 PM
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Originally Posted by fearsome View Post
The real issue here is just that treated lumber is more expensive so unless its scrap laying around most people wont pay extra money to build anything indoors out of treated lumber.
2.97 (treated) vs 2.49 (untreated) for an 8' 2x4.............

I see no point in making any (w/ the exception of fish tank furniture ) indoor project out of treated..unless you live in the tropics or have a leaky roof..

Though it "depends" on quality and treatment I still find that:
Quote:
However, it should be noted that pressure treated lumber can be dimensionally unstable, giving it a tendency to crack, split. It should also be noted that the material has a tendency to retain moisture out of the shop. When that moisture dries up,the wood will shrink, twist and warp. If you plan on purchasing pressure treated lumber, make sure to buy the “premium” or “select” boards which will offer protection against cracked, twisted, and warped wood....
That said, I'd use "normal" lumber and protect the top w/ a layer of laminate or some other "water resistant" surface.. Heck a ceramic tile top could cost you less than $30 (15 sq ft).....($13 for the durock, ceramic tile .99/sq ft)

5 coats of poly is even cheaper........

Arsenic aside, I'm not against it totally.. just don't consider it "the best" .. or really necessary..

Quote:
Studies have shown that CCA-treated lumber does leach chromium, copper and arsenic into the surrounding soil. The migration of these elements appears to be limited. In addition, research has not clearly shown a long term negative impact upon plants or animals.
Then again there is arsenic in apples........
Quote:
Studies have shown that the juice contains very low levels of arsenic, a cancer-causing agent found in everything from water to soil to pesticides. The FDA has monitored arsenic in apple juice for decades and has long said the levels are not dangerous to consumers, in particular small children who favor fruit juice.
http://www.nbcnews.com/health/diet-f...ce-f6C10612227
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post #13 of 21 (permalink) Old 02-15-2014, 02:31 PM
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The point on warping is being missed totally. Warping in this case is totally due to the wood being used. Treated lumber is different from the start. Look at the grain on this wood. It is often Southern yellow pine. That means it starts with far more sap than most wood. It is treated by soaking it in liquid which adds more. Lift a treated versus a kiln dried item and you see the difference right away. Over time, that moisture dries out and the wood is free to warp.
Looking at the first picture you can begin to see the top front board beginning to warp already. It should be a straight line parallel to the tank top as well as line up with the second board. You could say that part of that is due to camera distortion but there are other clues. Look at the gap showing at the ends of the board. In the next to last picture we get a better look at this one board that shows it is beginning to droop in the center. Front board and second board should be straight and level with each other for the full length.
What will it be in six months?
Treated lumber is just not good lumber for things you want to stay straight and level. Note how many highway signs are on crooked 4X4 posts because they used treated wood.
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post #14 of 21 (permalink) Old 02-15-2014, 03:00 PM
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Originally Posted by fearsome View Post
.... But that doesn't stop people because a properly secured piece of lumber of any type will be braced and screwed together such that it will resist warping.
When you restrain wood from warping it cracks instead. Wood that tries to warp will always either warp or crack, neither of which is good. What restraining wood is good for is preventing stress from causing permanent bends in the wood - like when a board is left laying on two sawhorses, unsupported in the middle, it permanently bends down in the middle due to the weight of the board.
Quote:

Most of the aquarium stand I have seen over the years have mold issues, often black mold but you don't see people freaking out about that but that can actually mess you up. I know multiple people who have had serious health issues due to black mold, I don't know anyone who was harmed by treated lumber.
No aquarium stand I have had has ever had black mold on it, that I can recall. I never have had an aquarium stand get that wet and sit there wet for months at a time. There is no reason for any aquarium stand to get more that a slight amount of surface water, from minor spills. A persistent leak from an aquarium is not normal.

I don't believe that "touching treated wood" presents any health issues unless it is to a pet or a small child. Then the issue is that they don't wash after touching the treated wood, but get the residue in their mouth. Pets can gnaw on the wood, but how many pets actually do that? The risk of using treated wood indoors is small, but totally unnecessary, so why do it?

Hoppy
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post #15 of 21 (permalink) Old 02-16-2014, 01:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fearsome View Post
How many people do you know that get sick every time they go out on their deck? Seriously you gotta think before fear mongering. The chances of someone getting sick because they built an aquarium stand out of treated wood are probably lower than what people normally use it for which is deck and picnic tables that they eat on and sun bath on.

Lets also discuss warping since people made a big deal out of it. Sure any wood over time can warp. But the worst warping happens because of differences in moisture and that can just as easily happen on kiln dried lumber. Because if you are using it on an aquarium what do you think is going to happen? It will receive uneven attack from moisture. But that doesn't stop people because a properly secured piece of lumber of anytype will be braced and screwed together such that it will resist warping.

Most of the aquarium stand I have seen over the years have mold issues, often black mold but you don't see people freaking out about that but that can actually mess you up. I know multiple people who have had serious health issues due to black mold, I don't know anyone who was harmed by treated lumber.

The real issue here is just that treated lumber is more expensive so unless its scrap laying around most people wont pay extra money to build anything indoors out of treated lumber.
Sorry but it's not the same as using PT outside. Outside it is exposed to sun which dries out the top layer.
Outside the fumes from ACQ are dispersed. Not true in most homes especially newer, tighter homes.
Did you do the research on the new types of PT? I did. I also did on CCA and fought for its removal. And no, I am not an ecological activist but CCA was that bad. Jury is still out on ACQ and truthfully I haven't seen many reports where the wood industry wasn't funding them behind the scenes.
BTW Fear mongering? The CCA did make people sick. It did contaminate soil. This new stuff hasn't been in common use long enough to see the full effect. But thye do still recommend you DO NOT use it for raised beds in vegetable gardens. They MSDS also says to wear appropriate protection when cutting. I've put the link to the MSDS in an earlier post.

Why don't you hear about people getting sick? Well you really aren't as exposed to the PT outdoors as much as you are indoors. Pretty simple math really.
Warp on PT? I've got 4 4 x 4 posts on my fish house shed. All properly secured. It has twisted. There is no way to avoid it. It warps more than kiln dried. Period.

BTW down here PT is cheaper than non treated. But we are also home to Robbins Lumber which is one of the companies that treat the wood for HD and others.

You'd be better advised to use a decent untreated wood and add a coat or three of poly. That is a film forming finish so it is in effect sealed in plastic.
Quote:
Hoppy
I don't believe that "touching treated wood" presents any health issues unless it is to a pet or a small child. Then the issue is that they don't wash after touching the treated wood, but get the residue in their mouth. Pets can gnaw on the wood, but how many pets actually do that? The risk of using treated wood indoors is small, but totally unnecessary, so why do it?
How many adults do exactly the same thing? take it a step further and instead of an aquarium stand it's a table. How many times, as an adult, do you touch the kitchen table then eat a sandwich? Do you wash your hands after you touch the table? Why would you expect you would wash after touching a PT table?

Dilution is the solution for the pollution.
Quote me as saying I was misquoted.
Once you get rid of integrity the rest is a piece of cake.
Here's to our wives and sweethearts - may they never meet.
If you agreed with me we'd both be right.
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