Will this DIY co2 method work? - The Planted Tank Forum
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post #1 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-24-2011, 02:29 AM Thread Starter
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Will this DIY co2 method work?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DGD9_...e_gdata_player


What can I do to make it better?

Basicly pumping air into yeast sugar water solution. Hoping it displaces co2 out top into air stone in tank and water flow disperses.
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post #2 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-24-2011, 04:05 AM
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I doubt its helping anything.
You may be getting more co2 out of that bottle, but its all being lost at the surface of your tank. Maybe try turning the air pump down (if it has that function) so there isn't so much commotion.
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post #3 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-24-2011, 04:16 AM
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+1 your probably loosing almost all your c02.
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post #4 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-24-2011, 04:59 AM Thread Starter
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Would I defuser fix that?
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post #5 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-24-2011, 05:12 PM Thread Starter
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Built this diffuser/bubble counter. Think it will do the trick?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fQnx5...e_gdata_player
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post #6 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-24-2011, 05:15 PM
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Looks much better than before.
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post #7 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-24-2011, 05:36 PM Thread Starter
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I slowed it down even more...only a few bubbles leak out every few seconds....hopefully the co2 dissolves into the water in the chamber.
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post #8 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-01-2012, 02:54 AM
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It did nothing but pumping air thru your diffuser if you are using pump into the yeast. Although co2 is also produced in the mix of air.
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post #9 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-01-2012, 03:36 AM
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No, this doesn't do a thing.
The little bit of co2 created by the brew, binds together with the air and raises super fast with the bubble to the surface.

If you would put the airpump inside the bottle, it would push out more co2, but would not work.

I would stop this, you pump more co2 out of the tank than inside.


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post #10 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-03-2012, 08:25 PM
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You're doing it wrong.

Get rid of the air pump altogether. It's doing nothing but diluting the CO2 produced, lessening the efficiency that it is dissolved into the tank. As CO2 is produced by the yeast, it will push it's way into the tank quite easily.

Put the tank end of the tubing into the diffuser you've built, and increase the size (diameter) of the chamber so that no CO2 is blown out the end. My active diffuser:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G_F-MIDwBvc

(The foam block at the top keeps most particulate out, as the bottom one is harder to remove and clean. The bottom foam helps slow the water flow, keeping the CO2 bubbles in the tube where they dissolve in the moving water.)

Oh, and a check valve at the top of the tank, before the line goes down to the diffuser is a good thing.


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post #11 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-03-2012, 09:32 PM
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ur losing all your CO2 because of the air pump.

Typically u just want CO2 and only CO2.
The way a yeast works, is as it ferments, it produces co2..
This CO2 then get fed though the straw and into your system.

Also you cant use a diffuser on a DIY... the reason is diffusers mostly require a moderate amount of PSI. And that type of PSI can burst your yeast container.

You want a bubble diffuser... the ones which a step like ladder, which slowly diffuse the co2.. or u want a reactor, something which doesnt require a lot of PSI to be fed.

@ grnbrg, that isnt a diffuser, you have a reactor.
Diffuser uses a ceramic disk, or some form of a very tight pours ceramic.... and forces bubbles as a very fine mist.
You have a in-tank reactor setup the way u have it.
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post #12 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-03-2012, 10:01 PM
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You're also adding oxygen to what is supposed to stay an anaerobic environment. What will happen is that bacteria and wild yeast/mold spores will be introduced to your mixture and it will "spoil" (go sour) quickly. The "air" inside the bottle is supposed to evacuate eventually as the yeast creates CO2. This is why brewers use air locks on their fermenters.

There ain't no free lunch unfortunately.
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post #13 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-03-2012, 10:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Naekuh View Post
@ grnbrg, that isnt a diffuser, you have a reactor.
Diffuser uses a ceramic disk, or some form of a very tight pours ceramic.... and forces bubbles as a very fine mist.
You have a in-tank reactor setup the way u have it.
I admit my terminology may be wrong, but are you sure?

I was under the impression that the vessel containing the yeast/water solution was the reactor (the CO2-producing reaction takes place here) and the hardware in the tank was the diffuser. The process of gas going into solution is "diffusion".

Quote:
Originally Posted by m00se View Post
You're also adding oxygen to what is supposed to stay an anaerobic environment. What will happen is that bacteria and wild yeast/mold spores will be introduced to your mixture and it will "spoil" (go sour) quickly.
Best answer so far!


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post #14 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-03-2012, 11:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grnbrg View Post
I admit my terminology may be wrong, but are you sure?

I was under the impression that the vessel containing the yeast/water solution was the reactor (the CO2-producing reaction takes place here) and the hardware in the tank was the diffuser. The process of gas going into solution is "diffusion".

grnbrg.

yes im fairly sure... reactors and diffusers are both used to get water saturated with CO2.

The term for the yeast ur looking for is Generator.... as in the yeast is generating CO2...
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post #15 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-03-2012, 11:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Naekuh View Post

You want a bubble diffuser... the ones which a step like ladder, which slowly diffuse the co2.. or u want a reactor, something which doesnt require a lot of PSI to be fed.

Actually, a good way to diffuse CO2 with DIY yeast is to get yourself a Hagen Elite power filter, and put the airline into the venturi port on the filter. They look like this:






Here is *one* way to modify them to get more CO2 dissolved. I did something similar to the output on mine with two short pieces of 5/8" vinyl hose, a schedule 80 barbed elbow, and a 8" long clear tube I cut from a T12 fluorescent light bulb protector from Lowes.

The following picture is from this thread:

http://www.barrreport.com/showthread...nt-Performance






If you google you will find quite a bit of info on using this specific pump and various ways to mod them.

They're around $10 at Petco. Great little pump for the $$ and probably the best hacker-style way to get CO2 into your water. You don't really even need the additional apparatus. If you don't mind lots of tiny bubbles in your tank you can just let it blast into the tank directly. Another way to use this pump is to forego the venturi intake and put the CO2 right into the intake of the pump after you make a small hole in the bottom where the sponge sits. I never tried it that way but there are plenty of people who have and say it works great too. The limit is your imagination.

Good luck!
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