Polyshades - The Planted Tank Forum
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 8 (permalink) Old 09-21-2011, 11:36 PM Thread Starter
Algae Grower
 
PTrader: (1/100%)
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Skokie
Posts: 50
Polyshades

Do you guys ever use Polyshades for your cabinets? I bought a can and tried a coat on the top thats hidden by the tank to see if it looks good. Its very streaky and lighter than I thought,
BlasingAsians is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 8 (permalink) Old 09-22-2011, 12:37 AM
Planted Tank Guru
 
PTrader: (84/100%)
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 21,015
I have tried it and didn't like it, but for some woods, like fir plywood, it is a way to tone down the awful grain pattern. You have to use dark colors for that though - walnut, etc.

Hoppy
Hoppy is offline  
post #3 of 8 (permalink) Old 09-22-2011, 11:02 AM
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
PTrader: (2/100%)
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: havre de grace, MD
Posts: 333
I used a bunch in the past for some trimwork. After 3 or 4 months all the poly started peeling off, and about a year later only half the wood was covered in poly. The peeling poly also removed some of the stain along with it. That made the peeling all the more obvious.
I may have screwed something up in the application process, but... I'm never going to use the stuff again.

As a matter of fact, yes, I always post, or reply, in novels. I'm adding it to my signature because it seems like I say it in every post!
Fraternity of dirt #32 I'm dirty

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
moonshinetheslacker is offline  
 
post #4 of 8 (permalink) Old 09-22-2011, 06:26 PM
Planted Member
 
sns26's Avatar
 
PTrader: (3/100%)
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Washington DC
Posts: 239
If you take the time to build your own stand, don't waste it finishing with Polyshades. I've found it to be inferior to separate stain+topcoat products, and you also can't properly build up several layers of topcoat.

I'm not much of an expert on stain, but that's because I spend a lot of money on wood. For topcoat, I love General Finish's Arm-R-Seal. This stuff is just amazing. Wipe on and walk away. (And repeat 3 or 4 times.) I've also used General Finish's water-based products as well. They are very good, but not quite as good as the oil-based products. This is an instance in which the "pro" grade stuff is only a little bit more expensive than the Home Depot stuff, but much much better.

sns26

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
sns26 is offline  
post #5 of 8 (permalink) Old 09-22-2011, 07:03 PM
Planted Tank Guru
 
PTrader: (84/100%)
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 21,015
I have used various colors of http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/200...-Mahogany.aspx for many projects. You can mix to get the exact color you want, with a lot of experimenting. And, the powders mix in alcohol or water. The advantage of dyes over stains is that they actually color the wood instead of just depositing pigments on the wood. So, they can reduce the contrast between hard and soft grain a great deal. I used them mostly on birch, just to get the colors I wanted.

Hoppy
Hoppy is offline  
post #6 of 8 (permalink) Old 09-22-2011, 07:36 PM
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
PTrader: (2/100%)
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: havre de grace, MD
Posts: 333
Just a quick thread de-railment, then re-railment.

Hoppy, those dyes look awesome! I've never heard of them before. I wish I had known about them, because I'd bet you probably can't accidentally sand off the dye if you missed a small bit of poly someplace. I'm going to get some of that and do some experimenting!

Re-railment: I would recommend getting a single piece of the same type of wood that your stand is made out of, along with 4 or 5 different small amounts of stain/dye. Tape off a few squares on the wood, and start staining. Don't be afraid of mixing stain either. One of my favorite stains is a first mixture of 50/50 sedona red with red oak, and a second coat of 50/50 mix sedona red and red mahogany.

As a matter of fact, yes, I always post, or reply, in novels. I'm adding it to my signature because it seems like I say it in every post!
Fraternity of dirt #32 I'm dirty

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
moonshinetheslacker is offline  
post #7 of 8 (permalink) Old 09-25-2011, 11:04 PM
Wannabe Guru
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Wake Forest NC
Posts: 1,121
Polyshades is a fine product as long as you have a steady hand.


It's just polyurethane with dye added to it, as they said above. Polyurethane is about the toughest finish that most DIY'ers have available to them.


It takes a while to dry, which is the only real downside.

Buy a GOOD QUALITY china-bristle brush to brush it on. Some people like foam sponges on a stick, but I get bubbles galore with them.

If you have an air compressor, and a good garage, you can get a cheap spray gun from Harbor Freight for $20 and spray on the Polyshades, it looks lovely when sprayed. Just spray VERY light coats, thin the Polyshades a little with paint thinner if you need to, and BEWARE the flammable overspray-- do this only in a well ventilated area.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
redfishsc is offline  
post #8 of 8 (permalink) Old 09-28-2011, 05:18 PM
Wannabe Guru
 
Uptown193's Avatar
 
PTrader: (8/100%)
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: New York City
Posts: 1,051
Hey I used Polyshades on my DIY stand and I think its pretty good. Here is pic of my project with it. I used Classic Satin Black. But I used wood conditioner first. But u have to buff with 0000 (?) steel wool after each coat until the last coat or it wont brush on properly. I never had any problems with bubbles and it does take awhile for it to dry but who cares. I used a $5 HD brush. I personally never had any problems with it and my project came out good. I am happy. So remember, 1. Sand the wood; 2. Use wood conditioner; 3. Polyshade; 4. Buff with 0000 Steel Wool; 5. Polyshade again; 6. Buff with 0000 Steel Wool after each coat of Polyshade you apply until the last coat.

Uptown193 is offline  
Reply

Tags
None

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Planted Tank Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome