diy aquarium stand fail. wet wood help! - The Planted Tank Forum
 
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post #1 of 8 (permalink) Old 05-25-2018, 06:07 PM Thread Starter
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diy aquarium stand fail. wet wood help!

so over the past few weekends I've been setting up a 75 gallon that I got for free on the side of the road (should have been my first clue to not take it). I took it home, built a stand, and resealed the tank. all was going well until I filled it to test for leaks and man did it leak. over night it lost about an inch of water and drenched the front of my stand. so now I just finished cleaning the mess I made (luckily it's in the basement on concrete so no real issues) and drained the tank and now I'm looking at my stand. it's made completely of 2x4s and my question is can I still use the stand? I did some searching and most of the people who had wet stands were made of particle board. does wet 2x4 lose it's strength? should I build a new stand or can I still use this one after it dries? thanks in advanced

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post #2 of 8 (permalink) Old 05-25-2018, 06:19 PM
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so over the past few weekends I've been setting up a 75 gallon that I got for free on the side of the road (should have been my first clue to not take it). I took it home, built a stand, and resealed the tank. all was going well until I filled it to test for leaks and man did it leak. over night it lost about an inch of water and drenched the front of my stand. so now I just finished cleaning the mess I made (luckily it's in the basement on concrete so no real issues) and drained the tank and now I'm looking at my stand. it's made completely of 2x4s and my question is can I still use the stand? I did some searching and most of the people who had wet stands were made of particle board. does wet 2x4 lose it's strength? should I build a new stand or can I still use this one after it dries? thanks in advanced

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2x4 are made of solid wood, so no worry here.
Just dry it up, and you're good to go. The risk you have is mold developping on the surface if kept weet long enough.
If it happens you can sand the surface to get it clean.

to prevent it from happening again, you can use oil or bee wax to seal the wood (it's easy to apply : just with a brush, a roll, or even a rag).
You can find oils and waxes that don't require slovents for cleaning, and those don't smell, don't leach toxic stuffs, dry fast, and are really easy to use.

once applied, the water really slides on the surface, so drops of water, or splashes won't affect the wood.
I did this for my aquarium rack, and had no issues even when splashing everywhere (i just let water evaporate, i don't even clean it)

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post #3 of 8 (permalink) Old 05-25-2018, 07:15 PM
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Should be zero problems. I'd just double check that you're still 100% level after the wood completely dries.
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post #4 of 8 (permalink) Old 05-25-2018, 07:15 PM Thread Starter
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2x4 are made of solid wood, so no worry here.
Just dry it up, and you're good to go. The risk you have is mold developping on the surface if kept weet long enough.
If it happens you can sand the surface to get it clean.

to prevent it from happening again, you can use oil or bee wax to seal the wood (it's easy to apply : just with a brush, a roll, or even a rag).
You can find oils and waxes that don't require slovents for cleaning, and those don't smell, don't leach toxic stuffs, dry fast, and are really easy to use.

once applied, the water really slides on the surface, so drops of water, or splashes won't affect the wood.
I did this for my aquarium rack, and had no issues even when splashing everywhere (i just let water evaporate, i don't even clean it)
thanks so much! you just saved me about 100$ in lumber. what kind of oil did you use for your rack?

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post #5 of 8 (permalink) Old 05-25-2018, 07:37 PM
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Tung oil works well.

Can also use boiled linseed oil.


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post #6 of 8 (permalink) Old 05-25-2018, 09:38 PM
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Before going to much trouble to seal the 2X4, there is really not much need of it. Keeping in mind that it is likely to be the standard kiln dried 2X like used for building construction, thinking how many of them stand out in the weather for months sometimes without warping or any damage may help ease the worry. Remember all those shiny white bare wood frames you may drive by?
Once fully dried, it's take a long, long time for wood to soak in much water or rot, fungus. Think how many people are frustrated with driftwood that floats for way too long when they try to use it? That's because it just takes a lot for water to soak into wood enough to matter.
If you were talking about some form of plywood, etc. it might delaminate if soaked for several weeks but we rarely see any damage to stands from water splashing. Sometimes there is some where the tank rim sets on the top and we can't get it wiped out from under the tank but that may takes years of repeated splashing and staying wet. I usually manage to knock the finish off a stand long before it rots!!
Do take some care to assure the stand is fully the same height at all four corners. One point higher than the other will put a twist on tanks and that can break the tank glass at some point.
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post #7 of 8 (permalink) Old 05-25-2018, 09:50 PM
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I would suggest you to try to dehumidify the room too. If I understand it correctly 2x4 is from spruce. It is one of the softest wood and sometimes could bend when absorb a lot of water (depends on its grains and the cut). If not too late, trying to use clamps and bracing it with other thick piece of wood/metal/plastic and let it dry like that to maintain its shape.

Linseed is good but be careful when disposing the rug that used to apply the oil on the wood. I always turn it into a little torch, just for both entertainment and safety

Last edited by novv; 05-26-2018 at 09:35 AM. Reason: for clarification
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post #8 of 8 (permalink) Old 05-26-2018, 04:26 AM
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thanks so much! you just saved me about 100$ in lumber. what kind of oil did you use for your rack?

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Hello!
For cheaper prices, you can go for wooden flooring oils, they're much cheaper, with the same results.
Otherwise, at your local hardware store, look for bee wax for wood.
The oil is nicer if the wood has some grain to show (in that case, you sand your wood, and put multiple layers of oil for best results), whereas the wax just protects it, but it easily gives a soft, nice touch.

In all cases, it protects the wood really well. Of course if you bought pre-treated lumber, it's less usefull, however, you'll have a smooth surface, and water will simply slide of rather than stay there, giving a "always clean" effect.
However, if it's for invisible parts, go for the cheaper/faster option.

In my case, i like wood, so i use hardwoods (tiger wood), sand it very smooth, round edges with a router, then oil 3 to 10 layers for a nice smooth result.
On white woods, the visual impact of transparant oils is much less visible; however, you can use tinted oils (i used a chocolate tinted oil on basic pine beams on a project,
and it gave them the lookof a nice hardwood, and even revealed some wood figures)

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