DIY Manzanita Aquatic Wood??? - The Planted Tank Forum
 
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post #1 of 13 (permalink) Old 11-10-2010, 05:49 PM Thread Starter
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Lightbulb DIY Manzanita Aquatic Wood???

I was wondering if you could make Manzanita an aquatic wood easily? I saw this thread https://www.plantedtank.net/forums/sw...u-92223-a.html which sparked the idea. I know making your own aquatic wood takes quite a long time, but I was wondering how easily Manzanita is converted to an aquatic wood as there is TONS of this stuff about 5 miles from my house. Also that thread said it came from a burn area so is that implying that he did nothing to it but pick it from the ground and maybe clean it up a bit? or did he still soak it for a few weeks? Much thx for any help!
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post #2 of 13 (permalink) Old 11-10-2010, 06:08 PM
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Most manzanita is collected in the wild, cleaned up a bit (often with a pressure washer) and then dropped into the tank. It usually has to be secured down to prevent it from floating.

Manzanita is a commonly desired aquatic decoration.
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post #3 of 13 (permalink) Old 11-10-2010, 06:51 PM
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I've always been curious at why people tend to prefer only certain types of driftwood for tanks (manzanita or mopani, for example). Looks, certainly, are a factor, and availability (manzanita grows in the US, out west). Though mopani is African, I believe, so I scratch my head there.

But as far as I can tell, any hardwood will do, especially if it's long dead, presoaked, and the bark has been stripped. That being said, a friend of mine (who worked for years at a nice lfs) refuses to purchase any sort of wood for his tanks. He's always been a fan of finding whatever looks good and dumping it in without any prep, and natural manzanita probably can't be found within 2000 miles of here.

I bought some mopani from F&S because it was fairly cheap and adding it to an existing order didn't increase shipping, but I stare out my window at the forest out back daily. Surely I can find some oak that looks good and won't destroy my tanks' ecosystems?
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post #4 of 13 (permalink) Old 11-10-2010, 07:14 PM
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I have used oak, bog wood, mopani, manzanita, aspen, and even extremely old pine in tanks. All have worked fine without any issues. I also have some unknown pieces of wood in several tanks. Never noticed any issues with water perimeters or fish health.
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post #5 of 13 (permalink) Old 11-10-2010, 09:59 PM
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ive used cottonwood that ive found around my apt, that has lasted for over a year now with no issue


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post #6 of 13 (permalink) Old 11-10-2010, 10:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigboij View Post
ive used cottonwood that ive found around my apt, that has lasted for over a year now with no issue
I forgot to mention, I have that here also and have used it.

One thing i did try that did not work was sage. turned to mush.
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post #7 of 13 (permalink) Old 11-10-2010, 10:53 PM
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This is very interesting. . . makes me want to go out into my back yard and break off dead branches from trees. would this tree be ok to use? http://forestry.about.com/od/silviculture/p/mimosa.htm
If not how about dogwood or maple?
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post #8 of 13 (permalink) Old 11-11-2010, 12:03 AM
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Maple should work very well, but as with any other wood, the wood needs to be seasoned - dead for long enough to not have any sap left in it. I suspect Dogwood would also work well.

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post #9 of 13 (permalink) Old 11-11-2010, 12:11 AM
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Im a big fan of collecting driftwood along the river banks. Alot of these are unidentified wood. They just look cool. I soak them in my outdoor pond until they sink, boil them, and add them. At least 50 pieces in 10 years? Sometimes they initally grow a little algae, but it goes away, or I peroxide it. If its a heavy piece you shouldnt have to worry about it rotting. Apparently ive never found one that was toxic to a fish tank tho.

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post #10 of 13 (permalink) Old 11-11-2010, 02:18 AM
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One reason people choose certain woods is because of how long it will last. Mopani for instance is very dense (which also often allows it to sink without any soaking or weights) so it lasts for a long time without decomposing.
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post #11 of 13 (permalink) Old 11-11-2010, 02:09 PM
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Dry, dead wood is best. Fresh branches will likely rot. Happy wood hunting.
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post #12 of 13 (permalink) Old 11-11-2010, 06:36 PM
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Some trees or shrubs just naturally produce the shapes of branches, roots, trunks, etc. that look best in an aquarium. Others produce nice straight, unbranched, smooth parts that just don't have the character we want. That is likely to be the main reason for the popularity of some species wood over another. I haven't yet heard of someone harming their fish with a well seasoned piece of any wood.

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post #13 of 13 (permalink) Old 11-11-2010, 07:00 PM
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I've long supported folks to collect wood going back over 20 years.

Many have poo pooed me for this claiming all sorts of hogwash about fear mongering

But.........none have ever yet..........substantiated any of it.

Long dead old aged hard wood.
Stick with that, hard to go wrong.

Regards,
Tom barr




Regards,
Tom Barr
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