Dry Ice, CO2 generator - The Planted Tank Forum
 10Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-25-2016, 04:27 PM Thread Starter
Planted Member
 
MCSLABS's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 286
Dry Ice, CO2 generator

Anyone try putting together a CO2 generator using dry ice ? Drawing up plans now for one. We have a grocery store which sells dry ice here locally, would make things easy for sure.

Learning what I can..
MCSLABS is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-25-2016, 04:33 PM
Wannabe Guru
 
GrampsGrunge's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Diatom Alley, Lakeside, OR
Posts: 1,320
How you going to store it once it's gone gaseous?

Starting small, keeping it simple..(?)
250 gallon stock tank, "pond"
20 gallon H CBS Shrimp tank

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
GrampsGrunge is offline  
post #3 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-25-2016, 04:39 PM Thread Starter
Planted Member
 
MCSLABS's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 286
Schd 40 PVC is rated at 330 psi. Make up a bank of 2 liter volume with multiple tubes. Use a 250-300 psi blow off. About 80 grams of dry ice should yield around 300 psi in 2 liters. That should be enough CO2 to last a while in a 40 gallon tank.

Learning what I can..
MCSLABS is offline  
 
post #4 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-25-2016, 04:44 PM
Planted Tank Guru
 
Seattle_Aquarist's Avatar
 
PTrader: (64/100%)
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 6,296
Quote:
Originally Posted by MCSLABS View Post
Anyone try putting together a CO2 generator using dry ice ? Drawing up plans now for one. We have a grocery store which sells dry ice here locally, would make things easy for sure.
Hi MCSLABS,

Dry ice is typically expensive when comparing the volume of CO2 generated per dollar verses buying CO2 gas. Also dry ice is difficult to store. Lastly regulation of the amount of gas generated would be an issue so the fish don't die from too much CO2.
Hoppy and Hoppy like this.

Roy_________
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

75 Gallon, 2X55W AH Supply CF 8800K, 1XFluval F&P 2.0; 45 Gallon Tall, 96Watt AH Supply CF 6700K; 30 Gallon Long; Fluval F&P 2.0; 20 Gallon, 1X26W AH Supply LED; all with CO2 and (Calcined) Montmorillonite Clay
Seattle_Aquarist is online now  
post #5 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-25-2016, 04:53 PM Thread Starter
Planted Member
 
MCSLABS's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 286
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seattle_Aquarist View Post
Hi MCSLABS,

Dry ice is typically expensive when comparing the volume of CO2 generated per dollar verses buying CO2 gas. Also dry ice is difficult to store. Lastly regulation of the amount of gas generated would be an issue so the fish don't die from too much CO2.
Dry Ice here is around $1 a pound. 1 pound of dry ice is a tremendous amount of gas.

There is a valving issue which I'm working on now, but dry ice is readily available here locally.

Learning what I can..
MCSLABS is offline  
post #6 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-25-2016, 05:00 PM
Children Boogie
 
mistergreen's Avatar
 
PTrader: (13/100%)
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Cincinnati
Posts: 16,743
Dry Ice, CO2 generator

Since dry ice is so easy to get, try setting it up like a yeast reactor. I have not ideA how long it would last or how much co2 it'll generate.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
MCSLABS and MCSLABS like this.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
mistergreen is offline  
post #7 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-25-2016, 05:15 PM Thread Starter
Planted Member
 
MCSLABS's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 286
You could run it 96 days at 2 bubbles per second around the clock for 96 days on 1 pound of dry ice.

Learning what I can..
MCSLABS is offline  
post #8 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-25-2016, 05:33 PM Thread Starter
Planted Member
 
MCSLABS's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 286
Quote:
Originally Posted by mistergreen View Post
Since dry ice is so easy to get, try setting it up like a yeast reactor. I have not ideA how long it would last or how much co2 it'll generate.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I am in new product development at this company and I do tend to over think things a tad and sometimes make them more complicated than necessary. ^^^^^ the above suggestion sounds a whole lot easier to manage. Still got to figure out what to do with excess pressure as it sublimes from solid to gas.

Learning what I can..
MCSLABS is offline  
post #9 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-25-2016, 06:12 PM
Planted Tank Guru
 
Seattle_Aquarist's Avatar
 
PTrader: (64/100%)
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 6,296
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seattle_Aquarist View Post
Hi MCSLABS,

Dry ice is typically expensive when comparing the volume of CO2 generated per dollar verses buying CO2 gas. Also dry ice is difficult to store. Lastly regulation of the amount of gas generated would be an issue so the fish don't die from too much CO2.
Hi MCSLABS,

Actually I have to correct my statement. I just "did the math" and:

1 pound of CO2 Solid (dry ice) will produce approximately 12 cu ft of CO2 gas

1 pound of CO2 Liquid (i.e. in cylinder) will produce approximately 9.7 cu ft of CO2 gas

I pay about $2 per pound to fill my CO2 cylinders so Dry Ice is certainly cheaper on a dollar per cubic foot of CO2 basis.
MCSLABS and MCSLABS like this.

Roy_________
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

75 Gallon, 2X55W AH Supply CF 8800K, 1XFluval F&P 2.0; 45 Gallon Tall, 96Watt AH Supply CF 6700K; 30 Gallon Long; Fluval F&P 2.0; 20 Gallon, 1X26W AH Supply LED; all with CO2 and (Calcined) Montmorillonite Clay
Seattle_Aquarist is online now  
post #10 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-25-2016, 06:31 PM
Planted Tank Guru
 
PTrader: (4/100%)
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Bushkill, Pa
Posts: 2,577
I don't run CO2 in any of my tanks but good gosh do I love reading DIY threads that really think out of the box. I was neck-deep in SW for 13 years and you just wouldn't believe the creativity over that time span.
MCSLABS and MCSLABS like this.

Angelo

"Why can't my wife see all of this stuff as an investment?"
Bushkill is offline  
post #11 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-25-2016, 07:17 PM
Wannabe Guru
 
GrampsGrunge's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Diatom Alley, Lakeside, OR
Posts: 1,320
Quote:
Originally Posted by MCSLABS View Post
Schd 40 PVC is rated at 330 psi. Make up a bank of 2 liter volume with multiple tubes. Use a 250-300 psi blow off. About 80 grams of dry ice should yield around 300 psi in 2 liters. That should be enough CO2 to last a while in a 40 gallon tank.
I'd be really, really, cautious about storing a high pressure gas in a DIY tank, that 250~300 psi could cause a lot of damage if the endcaps came loose or it structurally failed.

Honestly, this is a really, really bad idea. I've seen the aftermath of someone's attempt to make a confetti cannon using 6" PVC sched 40 blow-off tanks. Is it worth damaging your house or injuring loved ones?
MCSLABS and MCSLABS like this.

Starting small, keeping it simple..(?)
250 gallon stock tank, "pond"
20 gallon H CBS Shrimp tank

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
GrampsGrunge is offline  
post #12 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-25-2016, 08:20 PM Thread Starter
Planted Member
 
MCSLABS's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 286
I've been rethinking this idea a little, thought of an explosion in the middle of the night is rather distasteful.

I do have a stainless steel thermos, 32 oz I never use any more. I think I will attached a 10 psi blow off and a supply line with a needle valve. I got 4 spools of 20 and 22 gauge PTFE tubing which would cut down flow considerably.

Learning what I can..
MCSLABS is offline  
post #13 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-25-2016, 08:59 PM
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Alberta, Canada
Posts: 588
If you are allowing built up pressure to gas off, the system will only generate CO2 for as long as it can stay cold. At best you are talking 2-5 days with 99% of the CO2 being wasted.

It is not practical to contain the pressure generated by solid CO2. It would look almost identical to an off-the-shelf CO2 system, except instead of a cylinder you'll need to include some kind of enormous box with a door that can survive many tons of force.

You may be able to store unpressurized CO2 in balloons or something but it would of course need to be stored at near nominal volume.
MCSLABS and MCSLABS like this.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
691175002 is offline  
post #14 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-25-2016, 10:53 PM
Children Boogie
 
mistergreen's Avatar
 
PTrader: (13/100%)
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Cincinnati
Posts: 16,743
yeah, it's best not to seal the pressure without a certified gas tank. You can give it an output where there is no high buildup like a DIY yeast CO2.
MCSLABS and MCSLABS like this.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
mistergreen is offline  
post #15 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-26-2016, 01:55 AM
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
KevinC's Avatar
 
PTrader: (6/100%)
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Oshkosh, WI
Posts: 738
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seattle_Aquarist View Post
Hi MCSLABS,

Actually I have to correct my statement. I just "did the math" and:

1 pound of CO2 Solid (dry ice) will produce approximately 12 cu ft of CO2 gas

1 pound of CO2 Liquid (i.e. in cylinder) will produce approximately 9.7 cu ft of CO2 gas

I pay about $2 per pound to fill my CO2 cylinders so Dry Ice is certainly cheaper on a dollar per cubic foot of CO2 basis.
1 pound of CO2 is 1 pound of CO2 - no matter the phase. At the same temperature and pressure the gas has the same density, so both generate the same volume of gas.

OP: If dry ice is so cheap, I wonder why liquid isn't? It costs less to make the liquid - since compressed liquid tanks are used to make the solid.

Kevin

72g bowfront planted, CO2, 4x - T5HO, Eheim 2213 and 2217, 2 angels, pristella tetras, blue tetras, betta, albino bristlenose pleco, albino cories. Sword, vals, hygros, ludwigias, java moss and fern, anubias

2g Mac-quarium. Clown gravel, fluorescent plastic plants, and 2 guppies.
KevinC is offline  
Reply

Tags
None

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Planted Tank Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome