Michigan Native Biotope Riparium - The Planted Tank Forum
 64Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 58 (permalink) Old 10-15-2019, 10:48 PM Thread Starter
Algae Grower
 
SwampGirl's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 116
Michigan Native Biotope Riparium

I have always wanted to do a biotope aquarium, and after the failure during the planning stages of my Australian riparium (all my pseudomugil died) and some difficulty finding Australian plants, I decided to go a little closer to home and do a biotope of my backyard, the Huron River in Ann Arbor MI.

The goals of this tank are mainly to house the Blackstripe Topminnows (fundulus notatus) that I caught and have been quarantining for 2 weeks. And to keep them in a faithful representation of the habitat I found them in. The other goals are to have lush, riparian growth, to keep mainly species of plants that can be found in/near Michigan rivers or at least within the topminnow's range (which is most of the mid-eastern US), and to have fun of course!

Speaking of plants, heres a list of species I either have or am considering:
- Currently Growing -
- Valisneria Sp. (Locally collected)
- Lysimachia/ Creeping Jenny. I actually found this at the location point of the minnows. Its non-native introduced and it may grow out of control but it looks very nice in my opinion.
- Ludwigia Palustris. Also collected this along with the fish, was growing aquatically and also as a slightly woody herb, terrestrially and emerged. I am growing some out now but I will probably buy some since this can be found in the hobby. Very nice look in its emerged/ shallow water form with red stems and veins and olive leaves.
- Fontanalis Antipyretica. Native moss that I actually got along with a shipment of dwarf crayfish. I have seen this growing in the Huron though i believe it prefers faster oxygenated water vs the more swampy conditions of this tank. We'll see if it survives.
- Nymphea Sp. Unknown hardy water lily that I had been growing in a container on my porch all summer. It is currently in plant quarantine. This will be the main plant In the deep aquatic section and is one of the ones I absolutely need to use. Everywhere I have seen fundulus notatus they are associated with lilies or other floating-leaf plants like spatterdock. They utilize the habitat of the floating leaves for shelter and I really want to observe this behavior in my tank.

- Want List -
- Pontederia/ Pickerelweed. I am worried this plant may grow too large for the space but it is an attractive and hardy local waterweed with pretty and long-lasting flowers.
- Carex Sp. Local sedge genus with a few species to choose from, I prefer Rosea and Grayi for size and foliage.
- Saururus Cernuus. The most 'U's you can fit in a binomial, and a pretty, not too large plant to boot!
- probably more that I will add

I made a much larger post on my laptop with images but I lost the draft so I will come back tonight and add images (posting on my phone right now and upload limit is already met) but I have already gotten started on prepping the tank, a 29 gallon high. I have de-rimmed the tank with minimal chipping of the corners (going to have to sand the edges) and I am in the process of testing some options for creating the land area. This is where I'm most inexperienced, I'm not sure if I should create a plenum or separate my land and water sections entirely? I kind of dont want to silicone or great stuff anything permanently to the glass so the tank can be torn down cleanly but I'm willing to if necessary. I was thinking of making an egg crate frame and sculpting great stuff pond foam on it outside of the tank and then fitting that piece in the tank and covering with substrate. Any advice here is appreciated.

Anyway I will update later tonight. Thanks for reading!
Chasmodes, aquanerd13 and rakali like this.
SwampGirl is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 58 (permalink) Old 10-16-2019, 07:08 AM
Algae Grower
 
nautal's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Oct 2019
Posts: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by SwampGirl View Post
I have always wanted to do a biotope aquarium,

do a biotope of my backyard, the Huron River in Ann Arbor MI.

The goals of this tank are mainly to house the Blackstripe Topminnows (fundulus notatus) that I caught and have been quarantining for 2 weeks.
The other goals are to have lush, riparian growth, to keep mainly species of plants that can be found in/near Michigan rivers or at least within the topminnow's range (which is most of the mid-eastern US), and to have fun of course!


Thanks for reading!

One fish that I believe might compliment your top minnow and Huron River biome, or probably au sable, grand, rifle, and other cleaner river systems is a couple rainbow darters. Though they do prefer somewhat more highly O2 environments of swifter stream riffles and somewhat shaded areas they are a "bottom water fish", you would be hard pressed to find a more vibrant fish in Michigan. They do well in planted environments or atleast some algae where they hunt and they will color up after introduction. Might be worth a look. I like your idea and look forward to further updates.
One other thing, both of these fish might benefit, increased coloration, from natural direct and indirect sunlight, you might have to add a chiller to the ecosystem you propose. As both species prefer stream ecology and O2 content at elevated temperatures (lights, sunlight, pumps, etc) will cause large swings in DO (dissolved oxygen) daily, among other biochemical water parameters. While its true that naturally these river systems do reach 68-72F in summer times... well its michigan and spring, fall and winter temps mean that most of the year decreased temps and turbitiy, seasonal run off, increased DO most of the year to name a few impact the natural environment that these fish live in.



Hope that helps and I am really excited to see what you are working on.
this is a place you could find them...http://jonahsaquarium.com/JonahSite/fishlist.htm
Chasmodes likes this.

Last edited by nautal; 10-16-2019 at 07:09 AM. Reason: added a hyperlink to help
nautal is offline  
post #3 of 58 (permalink) Old 10-16-2019, 02:49 PM Thread Starter
Algae Grower
 
SwampGirl's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by nautal View Post
One fish that I believe might compliment your top minnow and Huron River biome, or probably au sable, grand, rifle, and other cleaner river systems is a couple rainbow darters. Though they do prefer somewhat more highly O2 environments of swifter stream riffles and somewhat shaded areas they are a "bottom water fish", you would be hard pressed to find a more vibrant fish in Michigan. They do well in planted environments or atleast some algae where they hunt and they will color up after introduction. Might be worth a look. I like your idea and look forward to further updates.
One other thing, both of these fish might benefit, increased coloration, from natural direct and indirect sunlight, you might have to add a chiller to the ecosystem you propose. As both species prefer stream ecology and O2 content at elevated temperatures (lights, sunlight, pumps, etc) will cause large swings in DO (dissolved oxygen) daily, among other biochemical water parameters. While its true that naturally these river systems do reach 68-72F in summer times... well its michigan and spring, fall and winter temps mean that most of the year decreased temps and turbitiy, seasonal run off, increased DO most of the year to name a few impact the natural environment that these fish live in<a href="https://www.plantedtank.net/forums/images/PlantedTank_net_2015/smilies/tango_face_smile.png" border="0" alt="" title="Smile" >:-)</a>.



Hope that helps and I am really excited to see what you are working on.
this is a place you could find them...Jonah's Aquarium - We sell native fishes - Shipping to the USA - Fish List
Hi!! thank you for the support and the advice. You are right, darters would be a great addition to this tank and I had actually considered them. Rainbow darters can actually apparently be found in a riffle near the end reach of Fleming creek behind Matthei Botanical Gardens which is about 5 minutes from my home so I may go out there in the next couple days as I have some time off work.

Oxygen was a major concern for me in this tank and I really need to work on my plans for filtration. My current plan is to have 2 in-tank Tetra Whisper style filters filled with hydroponic planting media and use those as hybrid planters/ filters (with pre-filter sponge pads) but I'm not sure if that will provide enough water movement/ DO for the darters. I will have to check my book of the fish of huron but I don't think we have Exile or swamp darters here that would be more tolerant of lower DO levels. I will eventually get a picture of the location I collected the topminnows from (didn't think at the time, i was just excited to find them) but it was a small backwater right on the main stream, not 10 feet downriver from a shallow riffle so it likely does have pretty high DO levels. Actually maybe I should look in that riffle for darters as well. The only other fish I caught alongside the topminnows were a lot of tiny "minnows" (fry of various fishes) and some young sunfish. The Lepomis will get way too big for this water volume, so I was always planning just the minnows, but if I find some darters I may be able to convince myself to add them.

Anyway I meant to add some images in this post but I got off on a tangent and now I have to leave for work so I will be back this evening to update with pictures.

I'll leave you with a picture of the tank and some mockup egg crate and driftwood that I had available.


Bump: I had one more second so here's some pics of a lily and the fish!






"One other thing, both of these fish might benefit, increased coloration, from natural direct and indirect sunlight, you might have to add a chiller to the ecosystem you propose."

Also I forgot to address this part but the intended location for this tank is in front of a west-facing window that gets indirect sun all day (blocked by the next house being about 10 feet away, i live in the city) and about 2-3 hours of direct sun in the morning and evenings. I have a 20 gallon tank there right now and it gets to around 72-74 without a heater (at least in September, I've only just moved in here and I dont know how drafty the window is) I was planning on keeping the tank at room temperature, not heated or chilled.
Chasmodes and rakali like this.

Last edited by SwampGirl; 10-16-2019 at 08:35 PM.
SwampGirl is offline  
 
post #4 of 58 (permalink) Old 10-17-2019, 02:06 AM Thread Starter
Algae Grower
 
SwampGirl's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 116
I had some time at work while we were slow to do some drawings of the ideas I'm having about this setup. I now realize that this image isn't in the best focus but you get the main idea.



Basically I'm still not sure what to do about making a "land" area, whether I should have one at all in this size of tank, and if so what to construct it out of. The ideas I had in this picture were (starting from the top left) 1) A land portion that comes out of the water and has an undercut over the surface. This seems the hardest to accomplish. 2) Egg crate frame with nylon window screen covering, substrate directly on top of the frame. This is basically what I did in my 55 gallon and it worked but I wanted a deeper substrate level. 3) separating the water and land portions keeping the terrestrial substrate out of the water column. 4) Using riparium-style planters such as the ones Riparium Supply used to sell (can you buy these anymore? is @hydrophyte still around? The aquaverdi website seems not to have been updated in a while) This would provide the most water volume while still having riparian growth. I am considering maybe a hybrid of this and #2. 5) Using the tetra whisper style filters as riparium planters, providing oxygenation to the plants roots and also bio filtration to the water column.

I have the next 2 days off work so I will probably do something on this tomorrow but I'm currently going in blind so I would appreciate any advice or comments.

Here is another image of the topminnows I've been using as inspiration, from inaturalist.

I am definitely going to have leaf litter and sticks/ twigs/ natural botanicals for the substrate. I want to also collect or possibly buy some local gammarus/ hyatella scuds that I will introduce to the tank while it is cycling. These can be found pretty easily by sifting through leaf litter taken from the river. Many other interesting (and helpful or harmful!) macroinvertebrates can be found this way.
Chasmodes and chicken.nublet like this.
SwampGirl is offline  
post #5 of 58 (permalink) Old 10-17-2019, 06:14 AM Thread Starter
Algae Grower
 
SwampGirl's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 116
So I did a looooot of diggin and browsing Michigan Flora and looking for native plant nurseries (no, I don't want to buy 100 plugs, i just want 2!) and I'm starting to think that I should keep the structure of this tank simple, with no above water portion but still a shallower and deeper side, with a combo of emersed plants rooted underwater and riparium-style planters (will probably DIY these as the actual riparium stupply ones are $$)

I have organized the likely plant selections into a few cagtegories, and selected a few genera/ species that I can choose from (based on availability) in each category.

Fully Aquatic Plants
Pretty self explanatory, the plants that grow only underwater, with only floating leaves or flower spikes emerging.
Nymphea sp. I already have this so it is definitely going in.
Valisneria americana Will likely have some of this in the deepest parts.
Persicaria amphibia I may have to collect this myself but look at this habitat, this is exactly what I am recreating.

Ceratophyllum/ Myriophyllum many members of these genera are native or naturalized, and they form attractive underwater mats such as these.

Brasenia schreberi Cool, smaller floating leaves and an interesting flower. Member of Cabombacae.

Potamogeton crispus Another smaller floating leaf plant but this one has attractive, undulating submersed leaves. I observed this in the location where I first found the topminnows.
Utricularia Again, many native species to choose from. Good for the shallow water. Though these might pose a hazard to topminnow fry, I'm not sure how small they are.

Emergent Plants
These plants are rooted underwater but grow vertically above the water surface.
Marsilea quadrifolia This one is actually in the hobby, grows floating and emergent. Useful for filling up space between other plants as it grows low.
Menyanthes trifoliata/Bogbean is a wetland plant but can tolerate a wide range of wetness and grows emergent.

Schoenoplectus subterminalis An aquatic bulrush.

Sparganium emersum Another wetland plant

Decodon verticillatus Very interesting loosestrife that may get too large for this tank.

Berula erecta

Bidens beckii This is sort of an aquatic but it readily grows emergent and flowers so i'm including it here.


Riparian Plants
These are plants that are true water lovers but do not do well with their foliage submersed. Some of these grow as emergents in shallow water, but will be planted in riparium planters to contain them.
Caltha palustris/ Marsh marigold, very common little yellow flowering plant.

Andromeda glaucophylla Small shrub.

Asclepias incarnata Milkweed! A classic Michigan plant for sure. The large alternating leaves and thick stems of Asclepias sp. are very attractive imo.

Bidens cernua/ Bidens trichosperma/ Bidens Sp. Hydrophytic sunflower family. This is trichosperma, the most attractive.

Comarum palustre/ Swamp rose.

Acorus americanus native sweet-flag. Gets very big and I may substitute the asian one, which is also naturalized. Classic riparium plant.

Well I now realize that's a lot of pictures but hopefully this gives a better idea of what I am going for. Tomorrow I have the whole day to do chores and work on this so I will likely be building my egg create frame and starting to sort out my substrate, for which I will be using soil with (???) to cap it, I will sift the soil and start soaking it. I will also prototype the filter-planters with the two tetra whisper filters I have and some possible substrates.

As always thank you for reading and stay tuned, and please feel free to drop any comments or advice if you think I am missing something major!
Sarpijk, Chasmodes, Jontym and 3 others like this.
SwampGirl is offline  
post #6 of 58 (permalink) Old 10-17-2019, 03:44 PM
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
minorhero's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: Maryland
Posts: 759
Awesome project! I am going to be building a native 120 gallon tank in the near future. I am currently collecting native plants I find myself and trying them submersed in my quarantine tank along with some eastern blacknose dace I caught.

A few thoughts for you. First is a concern on how high your water level will be in this tank? You derimmed a 29 gallon tank which was fine when this was a paludarium/riparium and half your volume was going to be air. Now that you are talking about going fully aquatic, keep in mind that your tank structure may not be able to support the tank being completely filled. It also might be fine. It also might be fine for say 1 year and then burst explosively one night. All of these things happen when people derim taller tanks.

Second, If you wish to create a land portion that is not permanently affixed to the side of your tank, you may be best off creating it from a solid container planted in substrate with a fine screen acting as a window to passively move water into and out of the container that has your terrestrial plants.

Essentially build a hill out of gravel, then take a large Tupperware (or similar) container, cut a hole in the side of that container. Install fine screen by whatever means you wish (epoxy probably) and then bury the Tupperware in the hill. The top of the Tupperware is even with the waters surface. The container can be as tall as needed, but the taller it sticks out of the hill the harder it will be to hide (put a lot of rocks in front of).

As to what to put into the container? This is a really good application for aquasoil. It will grow terrestrial plants as well and it won't cloud your water or generally make a mess when you need to replant etc. You can also dose fertilizer into your water just like you normally would and it would affect the terrestrial plants as well. You can cap the land portion with whatever you want (but probably sand) for aesthetics.
Chasmodes likes this.
minorhero is offline  
post #7 of 58 (permalink) Old 10-17-2019, 03:59 PM Thread Starter
Algae Grower
 
SwampGirl's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by minorhero View Post
Awesome project! I am going to be building a native 120 gallon tank in the near future. I am currently collecting native plants I find myself and trying them submersed in my quarantine tank along with some eastern blacknose dace I caught.

A few thoughts for you. First is a concern on how high your water level will be in this tank? You derimmed a 29 gallon tank which was fine when this was a paludarium/riparium and half your volume was going to be air. Now that you are talking about going fully aquatic, keep in mind that your tank structure may not be able to support the tank being completely filled. It also might be fine. It also might be fine for say 1 year and then burst explosively one night. All of these things happen when people derim taller tanks.

Second, If you wish to create a land portion that is not permanently affixed to the side of your tank, you may be best off creating it from a solid container planted in substrate with a fine screen acting as a window to passively move water into and out of the container that has your terrestrial plants.

Essentially build a hill out of gravel, then take a large Tupperware (or similar) container, cut a hole in the side of that container. Install fine screen by whatever means you wish (epoxy probably) and then bury the Tupperware in the hill. The top of the Tupperware is even with the waters surface. The container can be as tall as needed, but the taller it sticks out of the hill the harder it will be to hide (put a lot of rocks in front of).

As to what to put into the container? This is a really good application for aquasoil. It will grow terrestrial plants as well and it won't cloud your water or generally make a mess when you need to replant etc. You can also dose fertilizer into your water just like you normally would and it would affect the terrestrial plants as well. You can cap the land portion with whatever you want (but probably sand) for aesthetics.
Hello! Thanks for the comments and well wishes. You also bring up some interesting issues.

As for the height of the water in the tank, I was actually only planning on about 10-15 gallons of water in the tank either way, whether there is an emergent land portion or if it is Hydrophyte-style with only planters and emergent growth. Save to say, the water level was never intended to be higher than 2/3 of the way up the tank. Top rims of these sort of tanks are rarely structural (though this one was very well attached!) and I have considered siliconing in a glass brace but based on my tests, the glass doesn't bow at all even when filled to the top so I honestly am not too worried about the structural integrity.

Your suggestion for building a land portion is basically what I had drawn on the bottom left of that sheet but even easier. I may have to consider this method. I am going to the Re-Use center (local recycling center that re-sells things like a thrift store, very useful for finding cheap materials to start projects) and I will see what I can find that might accomodate this. My idea before was to make a box out of egg crate, cover it in nylon window screen, and then bury it in the substrate, but I was going to have it flipped upside down and filled with inert lava rock to take up space, but have the opening up and filled with soil might be a better option if I want to have deep root growth. I think I will actually be using sand and not gravel for this tank but the same idea applies either way I would think. I will test some things out today and update later.

Anyway thank you again for the interest in this project and I wish you luck on your upcoming native tank, we could really use more NA biotopes to inspire people to research the unique flora and fauna of North America that you rarely see in the hobby. Not all biotopes have to be blackwater from South America!
Chasmodes and minorhero like this.
SwampGirl is offline  
post #8 of 58 (permalink) Old 10-17-2019, 11:51 PM Thread Starter
Algae Grower
 
SwampGirl's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 116
Update! I'm just full of em today.

I took a walk out to where I originally collected the topminnows to take a few pictures and look closer at the vegetation that I had largely overlooked. I took a bunch of pictures so expect another picture-heavy update. What can I say, I just like visual aids.

Her are a few biotope inspiration images of the edge of the huron river in a partially wooded area (mostly dogwood, buckthorn, and maple.)








Check out the emergent aroid (likely Sagitarria or Peltandria) and the dogwood rooted underwater.

Some closer foliage shots

Possibly some kind of smartweed or knotweed?

Forest floor, 6 inches from the water surface.

(blurry) Sphagnum
Chasmodes, Jontym and Yams like this.
SwampGirl is offline  
post #9 of 58 (permalink) Old 10-18-2019, 02:08 AM
Planted Member
 
chicken.nublet's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: Singapore
Posts: 158
Sounds like an exciting project, will be following along for sure.
SwampGirl likes this.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Last edited by chicken.nublet; 10-18-2019 at 04:05 AM. Reason: .
chicken.nublet is offline  
post #10 of 58 (permalink) Old 10-18-2019, 02:11 AM
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
minorhero's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: Maryland
Posts: 759
Jealous of the aquatic plants you are finding in the wild!
SwampGirl and Yams like this.
minorhero is offline  
post #11 of 58 (permalink) Old 10-18-2019, 03:32 AM Thread Starter
Algae Grower
 
SwampGirl's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by minorhero View Post
Jealous of the aquatic plants you are finding in the wild!
You just have to go somewhere there is water and keep your eyes open! Unless you live in the desert (and even then there are unique oasis plants) there's bound to be aquatic plants near you, even just a roadside drainage ditch.

inaturalist.org is a great resource for finding and identifying species local to you. University websites are also good, I've learned a lot from the University of Michigan website and many other US states have great biology departments. Also (again if your US though I imagine this is common worldwide) your state government should have information on what plants occur in your state.

It's amazing how many well known aquarium plants aren't far flung tropicals from the Amazon or Borneo but just common American weeds.
Chasmodes likes this.
SwampGirl is offline  
post #12 of 58 (permalink) Old 10-18-2019, 04:32 AM Thread Starter
Algae Grower
 
SwampGirl's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 116
So today while I was out at the recycle center I found a half barrel resin pond for $3 and now I'm getting the idea that I want to have a sump for this tank. I've never done a sump on a tank with a lowered water level and I'm not even sure how I would go about doing that without flooding my house. Someone let me know if this is a terrible idea or how to modify the intake and outflow so that they keep a siphon with the water level so low.
SwampGirl is offline  
post #13 of 58 (permalink) Old 10-18-2019, 08:00 AM Thread Starter
Algae Grower
 
SwampGirl's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 116
Alright I'm sure nobody will blame me for triple posting if I'm updating on my own project and I had a lot of coffee so I'm doing a lot while I have 2 days off.

First, I started sifting some soil but then it struck me that I actually want larger pieces of organic matter, I just don't want the small amount of perlite and the sticks, basically anything that floated. So after sifting half of it, I dumped the other half into a bucket and filled it half way with warm water, gave it a big stir and left it on the porch. The soil has been sitting on my porch for months so I'm sure its been rained on and dried out again but just for good measure I also soaked the sifted dirt to see if anything floated, and to do a very small mineralization. I will save you the pictures of mud buckets. Tomorrow morning I'll fish anything floating out with a net and stir it up again, repeat over the next couple days.

Also as I was googling the species of plants that I wanted for this tank looking for nurseries that sell them, I found a pond store that sold quite a few and didn't have minimum orders! I had never ordered from them or heard of them but they did seem to be an actual business so I placed a small order just to test it out.

I ordered:
- Marsilea quadrifolia
- Hydrocleys nymphoides You won't find this here in Michigan but it looks the part of many of the smaller floating leafed plants that I couldn't find. One of the hardest parts of constructing a biotope is knowing where to compromise actually finishing it with being perfectly accurate.
- A Sagittaria labeled "Lance leaf arrowhead" but in the description it was claimed to be "Sagittaria graminea". we'll see but I would be happy with literally any arrowhead plant that will fit in this tank and S. Graminea is one of the smaller native species so I hope it actually is.

All of this came to around $25, I'm not sure what the rules are on mentioning vendors so I won't but I did receive a confirmation email right away so that is encouraging!

I also discovered that there is a local native plant nursery that sells at the farmers market close to me which just happens to be tomorrow morning so I'm going to go there and check them out. The main plants they have that I want are Asclepias incarnata, Verbena hastata, Eutrochium maculatum, and some Carex sedges.

Will update on the mud buckets tomorrow.
rakali likes this.
SwampGirl is offline  
post #14 of 58 (permalink) Old 10-19-2019, 04:30 AM Thread Starter
Algae Grower
 
SwampGirl's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 116
The fundulus are getting antsy to see their new home, but they're becoming much more comfortable with my presence and no longer immediately dart at my smallest movement so I can actually take more pictures.



Also my girlfriend and I went back to the collection location to do more plant scouting. I took a bunch of cuttings of cool looking weeds growing all over that I couldn't identify (attempting rooting in a glass of water) and some water forget-me-not which is a non-native naturalized weed (this seems to be a common theme)




I took cuttings of both of those plants that are growing in the shallow water. I think one of them might be Decodon verticillatus but I'm very unsure.

Here's a bonus riffle just 50 meters upstream, if you want an entirely different Huron biotope. This is closer to the habitat in which you're likely to find Etheostoma darters.



I also stopped by the LFS on the way home and brought them some bristlenose, picked up some baby tears (not dwarf) which I think is Micranthemum umbrosum, and some Ludwigia repens that I happen to know came from a certain youtuber plant producer based on the packing method.



Very nice plant that I hope I don't kill. I've had rotten luck with Ludwigias before. Those both went in the quickly overcrowding plant quarantine tank.



I also finally made some progress on the hardscape. I built boxes of egg crate to form steps, covered that in window screen and used lava rock and safe-t-sorb to build up the slope and create a rough surface to lay the substrate on. The plan with the two white containers is to fill them with dirt and cover with sand to keep the dirt more contained that will be the substrate for the emersed plants (though this is still going to be a very dirty tank, I don't want mud geysers) The water lily will be planted the same way, in a shallow container with dirt and a few rocks to hold it down, buried under the sand. Still playing with the wood layout, and I definitely want to get more pieces in there. I'm also going to work on some natural looking emersed planters, maybe with wood and pond foam.




I aaaaaaaalso scooped a bunch of floating perlite and wood in the mud buckets and changed the water and stirred them up again, going to keep repeating until the plants arrive. No idea when that will be but I don't want to plant until I have a decent enough plant mass to fight the initial algae war. I probably wont update until I have another day off or until if the plants arrive, whichever happens first.

Goodnight!
Chasmodes and Jontym like this.
SwampGirl is offline  
post #15 of 58 (permalink) Old 10-20-2019, 04:28 AM
Algae Grower
 
nautal's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Oct 2019
Posts: 19
one thought, you could use a clear plastic Hang on back inside the aquarium. Then add your emergent plants. they could even be on the outside and you could still do the ramp thing or however you want. Only thing to consider with these plants is that non are woody and capable of breaking the tank with their roots.
Lots of possibilities with this combo. A bog-type plant, such as wild cranberry, with these fish would be a cool juxtaposition.
Chasmodes likes this.

Hey you outside the tank, yeah, can you please set the timer again I am loosing some beauty sleep with this light schedule!
nautal is offline  
Reply

Tags
None

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Planted Tank Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome