Weird CO2 Idea - The Planted Tank Forum
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post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 01-25-2016, 11:38 PM Thread Starter
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Lightbulb Weird CO2 Idea

I have two heavily planted nanos and I was wondering: can I hook them both up to the same paintball CO2 system? Would they both have the same bps (half of the over all rate)? Also, if this is possible, would I be able to split the tubing with just a regular Petco airline 3-way adapter? Or would I need something stronger to withstand a 20 oz CO2 canister?

Any opinions or experiences are great!
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post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 01-25-2016, 11:42 PM
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Yes you can, I use this currently all 6 of them. Each have thier own needle valve bubble counter.

I probably wouldn't do much more than 2 on a paintball cylinder. If your needing more than one tank I would suggest getting a full size tank. It's cheaper than filling the paintball ones.

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post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 01-26-2016, 12:45 AM
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Originally Posted by Iwagumist View Post
I have two heavily planted nanos and I was wondering: can I hook them both up to the same paintball CO2 system? Would they both have the same bps (half of the over all rate)? Also, if this is possible, would I be able to split the tubing with just a regular Petco airline 3-way adapter? Or would I need something stronger to withstand a 20 oz CO2 canister?

Any opinions or experiences are great!
It's not feasible to do what you are suggesting because CO2 is going to follow the path of least resistance. Whichever diffuser has less resistance will get more CO2, probably the vast majority, if not all of it.

Using two identical diffusers, same tubing length, etc, will improve the chances, at least in the beginning until one of them clogs more than the other.

To run two tanks with any kind of consistency is going to require a dual outlet at the regulator with two individual needle valves.


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post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 01-26-2016, 12:58 AM
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It's not feasible to do what you are suggesting because CO2 is going to follow the path of least resistance. Whichever diffuser has less resistance will get more CO2, probably the vast majority, if not all of it.

Using two identical diffusers, same tubing length, etc, will improve the chances, at least in the beginning until one of them clogs more than the other.

To run two tanks with any kind of consistency is going to require a dual outlet at the regulator with two individual needle valves.
Exactly. Not that weird of an idea and its certainly done (I currently have a manifold which splits off into 4 separate lines). It is doable to run co2 from one cylinder to more than one aquarium but not as simple as just splitting the line. You'll need a manifold of sorts (like whats pictured above; or any of multiple potential DIY designs and/or premade manifolds) and will need a separate needle valve for each tank which you're looking to inject co2. Tricky, potentially expensive (but doesn't have to be), but certainly not impossible.

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post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-01-2016, 01:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by burr740 View Post
It's not feasible to do what you are suggesting because CO2 is going to follow the path of least resistance. Whichever diffuser has less resistance will get more CO2, probably the vast majority, if not all of it.

Using two identical diffusers, same tubing length, etc, will improve the chances, at least in the beginning until one of them clogs more than the other.

To run two tanks with any kind of consistency is going to require a dual outlet at the regulator with two individual needle valves.
I've measured my co2 in each tank and the output is the same. Both tanks thrive. Getting consistent bps per line.

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post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-01-2016, 05:42 PM
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I agree with the above.If it is within your budget to get a 5 or 10 lb. tank and retro fit it to your regulator than Greenleaf makes a good three way with fabco needle valves for about 75.00 than if you add another tank you will be ready to go.The initial cost is high but you would save a lot on refills.
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post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-01-2016, 06:04 PM
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I've measured my co2 in each tank and the output is the same. Both tanks thrive. Getting consistent bps per line.

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Your first post said each of your tanks has it's own needle valve and bubble counter. That's not what the OP is talking about.

The original question was splitting a singe line into two with a plastic T fitting made for airling tubing, using the same NV. While it is possible to do that way, the majority of CO2 is going to flow through whichever line has the least resistance, with no way to control how much goes to each tank.


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Last edited by burr740; 02-01-2016 at 11:59 PM. Reason: added a word for clarity
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post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-01-2016, 06:12 PM
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Originally Posted by burr740 View Post
Your first post said each of your tanks has it's own needle valve and bubble counter. That's not what the OP is talking about.

The original question was splitting a singe line into two with a T fitting, using the same NV. While it is possible to do that way, the majority of CO2 is going to flow through whichever line has the least resistance, with no way to control how much goes to each tank.
Yea I realized that now my bad..

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post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-01-2016, 06:13 PM
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It is doable and many have done it.

Look up co2 splitters (they come in 2-way, 3-way. 4-way, etc.). You want to use separate needle valves so you can control the pressure/amount of co2 to each aquarium. If you didn't use a separate needle valve then yes, as mentioned the co2 would go the path of least resistance and you would have unequal co2 distribution to aquariums.

People have used the air line valves, but they are inconsistent of the amount of pressure they release (lousy valve and most likely leak some). Not to mention, if too much pressure, they will just pop off. When I read of them used (plastic air line valves), they must have just been DIY co2 or low pressurized co2 pressure (because obviously otherwise they would pop off)
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post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-01-2016, 08:05 PM Thread Starter
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thanks!
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post #11 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-01-2016, 10:50 PM
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Just to be clear, what people are referring to as a "splitter" or "manifold" is, essentially, a tee with the gas from the cylinder coming in at one port, and leaving through the other two ports, with a needle valve at each of those ports. Want a third port? Add another tee and valve. It doesn't matter what it looks like from a practical perspective - if there are 3 or 10 openings, one of them is the inlet, and all the others are outlets, with the same pressure at each outlet, no matter where it is. It's probably easier to buy a prebuilt manifold, but it might be cheaper to buy the pieces individually and put them together, depending on what you're looking for. Either way, it's nice to know exactly how it works.
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