Can I use Tetra Lily Gro Tablets for my planted Aquarium? - The Planted Tank Forum
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 6 (permalink) Old 09-30-2015, 10:06 AM Thread Starter
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: USA
Posts: 315
Can I use Tetra Lily Gro Tablets for my planted Aquarium?

I was wondering if I can use tetra lily grow tablets for my planted aquarium. They are much more reasonable priced than Flourish Tabets which are almost a dollar per tablet!

Thanks:

Information:

Lily Gro Tablets - 75 pk | That Fish Place

link

Derived from ammonium phosphate, potassium nitrate, urea formaldehyde, manganese sulfate, ferric sulfate, zinc sulfate, copper sulfate, boric acid, sodium molybdate.

Guaranteed Analysis:
Total Nitrogen (N), 10%
Ammoniacal Nitrogen, 5.5%
Nitrate Nitrogen, 2.4%
Water Soluble Nitrogen, 1.5%
Urea Nitrogen, 0.6%
Available Phosphate (P2O5), 14%
Soluble Potash K2O, 8%
Boron (B), 0.02%
Copper (Cu), 0.05%
Water Soluble Copper (Cu), 0.05%
Iron (Fe), 0.11%
Water Soluble Iron (Fe), 0.11%
Manganese (Mn), 0.12%
Water Soluble Manganese (Mn), 0.12%
Molybdenum (Mo), 0.0006%
Zinc (Zn), 0.07%
Water Soluble Zinc (Zn), 0.07%
miogpsrocks is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 6 (permalink) Old 10-02-2015, 09:50 PM
Wannabe Guru
 
dukydaf's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Rome
Posts: 1,273
I used something simillar, JBL Florapond balls, in a 62G to enrich the sand substrate.

Generally, Ammoniacal Nitrogen is frowned upon and considered a trigger for algae. To be on the safe side, I would say no.

With this in mind , if you burry them deep enough and you have a big, heavily planted aquarium you might get by. Also such nutrient balls should be used if you have heavy root feeders , such as Nymphea, Cryptocoryne or Echinodorus plants. There is little benefit if you have carpet or stem plants.

Another thing to consider is how much money do you actually safe. What would be the cost per day if you use these pond balls or the other type ? Is it worth it ?

On hiatus till later this year
dukydaf is offline  
post #3 of 6 (permalink) Old 10-10-2015, 08:37 AM Thread Starter
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: USA
Posts: 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by dukydaf View Post
I used something simillar, JBL Florapond balls, in a 62G to enrich the sand substrate.

Generally, Ammoniacal Nitrogen is frowned upon and considered a trigger for algae. To be on the safe side, I would say no.

With this in mind , if you burry them deep enough and you have a big, heavily planted aquarium you might get by. Also such nutrient balls should be used if you have heavy root feeders , such as Nymphea, Cryptocoryne or Echinodorus plants. There is little benefit if you have carpet or stem plants.

Another thing to consider is how much money do you actually safe. What would be the cost per day if you use these pond balls or the other type ? Is it worth it ?
My plants have grown very little and I have had it them for 5 weeks. I have like 75 of these and I was thinking of maybe using like 1 tablet a month since its an Aquarium.

I have Ecocomplete which is made from lava rocks I think. If I bury them deep in the substrate does it normally trap it in so only the roots may feed on the nutriments?

Thanks.

P.S. These are my plants:

Assorted Anubias
Tropical Fern
Java Fern "Narrow"
Green Rotala
Moss Ball Mario
Dwarf Baby Tears
Anubias NANGI
JAVA Moss
Banana plant
Golden Jenny Lysimachia Nummularia
Red Ludwigia
Ammannia[censored] reineckii 'Pink' roseafolia or gracilis
Argentine Sword Echinodorus[censored]argentinensis
Betta plant Cryptocoryne Wendtii Green
Anacharis Bunch Egeria Densa
Moneywort Bacopa monnieri
miogpsrocks is offline  
 
post #4 of 6 (permalink) Old 10-11-2015, 06:44 PM
Wannabe Guru
 
dukydaf's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Rome
Posts: 1,273
Quote:
Originally Posted by miogpsrocks View Post
I have Ecocomplete which is made from lava rocks I think. If I bury them deep in the substrate does it normally trap it in so only the roots may feed on the nutriments?
Yes you will want to burry them as deep as possible. Some of the elements are easily soluble and will rise to the top of the substrate. However one might hope that the ammonia will be converted into nitrate by the time it reaches the top. You will not have 100% isolation but if your aquarium is big enought the impact on water quality will be minimal. How big an aquarium do you have ?

Those balls are messy (mud) once they disolve.Catfish activity and unrooting will cause some water contamination.

From the plants you have I will put one ball near (not under) the banana plant, echinodorus and cryptocoryne. These are your main root feeders, the rest of the plants will benefit from liquid fertilizers.

On hiatus till later this year
dukydaf is offline  
post #5 of 6 (permalink) Old 10-12-2015, 12:10 AM Thread Starter
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: USA
Posts: 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by dukydaf View Post
Yes you will want to burry them as deep as possible. Some of the elements are easily soluble and will rise to the top of the substrate. However one might hope that the ammonia will be converted into nitrate by the time it reaches the top. You will not have 100% isolation but if your aquarium is big enought the impact on water quality will be minimal. How big an aquarium do you have ?

Those balls are messy (mud) once they disolve.Catfish activity and unrooting will cause some water contamination.

From the plants you have I will put one ball near (not under) the banana plant, echinodorus and cryptocoryne. These are your main root feeders, the rest of the plants will benefit from liquid fertilizers.

I have 55 gallon tank and I put in 1 tablet as deep as it would go.

These basically introduce the same ammonia that you are trying to keep out of your tank with biological filtration?

If so, it seem like its counter productive.

Thanks.
miogpsrocks is offline  
post #6 of 6 (permalink) Old 10-12-2015, 05:32 AM
Wannabe Guru
 
dukydaf's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Rome
Posts: 1,273
Well, yes. Ammoniacal and urea nitrogen are also produced in the aquarium but usually in small quantities and quickly converted by the biological filtration.

However, they are also readily accessible sources of N to plants and algae. Plants will first take N in the ammoniacal and then the NO3, and that is why it is used in fertilisers. The problem is that ammonia has been suggested to act as a Start button for algae.

If the tablet is big enough, I would brake it in smaller pieces and spread it over time and in dif places of the aquarium.

I am no chemist so if somebody with more knowledge can add, please do.

Sent from my HTC One using Tapatalk

On hiatus till later this year
dukydaf is offline  
Reply

Tags
None

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Planted Tank Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome