Algae control .. phosphate removers .. product question - The Planted Tank Forum
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 19 (permalink) Old 07-07-2015, 03:38 AM Thread Starter
Algae Grower
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: uk
Posts: 63
Algae control .. phosphate removers .. product question

Hi,

I am trying to control algae that is getting on my plants.
I see that phosphate removers for aquariums is expensive.
Just wondering if i can use NTL Labs Pond Booster instead.
Its very cost effective as i would only need 65 grams or so.
I would use it in my external filter in a net.
Here is the product,
http://www.ntlabs.co.uk/products/Pon...Phosphate.html

Thanks for any replies.
jacko5 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 19 (permalink) Old 07-07-2015, 04:07 PM
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
micheljq's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Quebec
Posts: 963
Hi jacko5,

It is a planted tank right?

Phosphates are a macronutrient for plants so you must not remove them, unless you have a non-planted tank, even so. Phosphates are often blamed for algae issue, but rarely the cause, if at all.

I dose phosphates in my tank, like a lot of aquatic plant enthusiasts here.

Michel.

Plants and algae grower.
micheljq is offline  
post #3 of 19 (permalink) Old 07-07-2015, 05:50 PM Thread Starter
Algae Grower
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: uk
Posts: 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by micheljq View Post
Hi jacko5,

It is a planted tank right?

Phosphates are a macronutrient for plants so you must not remove them, unless you have a non-planted tank, even so. Phosphates are often blamed for algae issue, but rarely the cause, if at all.

I dose phosphates in my tank, like a lot of aquatic plant enthusiasts here.

Michel.
Michel,
Yes its a planted tank.
I am just sick of getting algae on my plants, and i have read online that Phosphates can cause this problem.
I does ferts, home made and use root tabs for my plants.
I change 25% of my aquarium water weekly.
Dont overfeed my fish.
I have LED lighting on for 8 to 9 hours,and co2 dosing.
I just cannot stop algae on my plants.
jacko5 is offline  
 
post #4 of 19 (permalink) Old 07-07-2015, 06:03 PM
Planted Tank Guru
 
klibs's Avatar
 
PTrader: (29/100%)
Join Date: May 2014
Location: NH
Posts: 3,325
Lets see some pics of your tank.

I'm willing to bet your fert regime is not the root cause of your algae troubles. Don't waste your money on 'phosphate remover' that is just ridiculous. Just do a bunch of water changes and dose less P if you think that is the issue lol.

Is it densely planted? How strong are your lights? What is your CO2 setup like? etc...


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
klibs is offline  
post #5 of 19 (permalink) Old 07-07-2015, 06:36 PM
Planted Tank Guru
 
PTrader: (538/100%)
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Oregon
Posts: 3,010
Algae is almost always caused by three things: too much light, too little co2, too much dissolved organic compounds.

Reduce your light, increase amount of co2, do larger water changes.

Phosphates do not cause algae, at least within reasonable ranges.
nilocg is offline  
post #6 of 19 (permalink) Old 07-07-2015, 07:24 PM
Banned
 
PTrader: (4/100%)
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Near Ashville, North Carolina
Posts: 1,866
Freshwater - phosphate good
Salt water - phosphate bad
jrill is offline  
post #7 of 19 (permalink) Old 07-08-2015, 03:03 AM Thread Starter
Algae Grower
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: uk
Posts: 63
Thanks for the info guys.
I have increased the light .. i was running 40% on both channels.
I have the LED's now running at 60% and 50%.
I will increase the water change to 33% weekly instead of 25%.
Not sure about more co2 as my PH may go to low, even though i am buffering with coral gravel in one of my external filters.
I live in a soft water area as well.
I will also put more plants in the tank, but i have a 6ft , 600 Litre tank so filling it with plants is expensive.
I was also putting 10ml of liquid plant food in a day, i will change that to 60ml in one dose weekly.

Last edited by jacko5; 07-08-2015 at 03:23 AM. Reason: added more info
jacko5 is offline  
post #8 of 19 (permalink) Old 07-08-2015, 03:30 AM
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: May 2015
Location: the desert
Posts: 541
If you already have algae you should not increase lights, you should cut back the time they are on. 9 hours is too much.
keymastr is offline  
post #9 of 19 (permalink) Old 07-08-2015, 06:00 PM Thread Starter
Algae Grower
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: uk
Posts: 63
d
Quote:
Originally Posted by keymastr View Post
If you already have algae you should not increase lights, you should cut back the time they are on. 9 hours is too much.
Thanks.
I have just checked my timer, they are on for 7 hours at 60% and 50%
Then an hour either side at 20% on the blue channel.
I think that is not to much but i may be wrong.
I am now thinking of a RO System and adding the stuff the fish need to the water.
Can anyone tell me what i would have to put in the water to make it Ok for the fish after the water has run through a RO system ?
jacko5 is offline  
post #10 of 19 (permalink) Old 07-08-2015, 07:54 PM
Planted Tank Guru
 
PTrader: (3/100%)
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Maryland, USA
Posts: 2,339
Quote:
I am now thinking of a RO System and adding the stuff the fish need to the water.
Bringing RO up to be good for fish? You could get away with a GH booster (calcium, magnesium, potassium, and sulfate), and an alkalinity booster (sodium bicarbonate).

For plants: You'll need to add nitrate, phosphate, and micronutrients (Fe, Cu, Zn, B, Mn, and Chloride) and possibly traces (Co, Ni, Mo ) as well. Na is also a micronutrient, but the alkalinity booster usually provides plenty.

But if you're thinking RO is going to cure your algae problems... be aware it probably won't.

Nutrient limiting isn't generally a good approach to controlling algae in planted tanks, at least in any kind of long term.. Algae need all the same nutrients that plants do, which makes sense since algae is a plant. If you take away something to kill the algae, you'll eventually kill your plants too. Unless you're dealing with non-algae problems like diatoms (which need silicates that plants don't need), this usually doesn't work out in the long term.

New to planted tanks, avid gardener/tinkerer.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Fluval C4 + Quietflow 30, Finnex Planted+ with
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
, low-tech.
10 gallon secondary tank with Finnex stingray with
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
, AC20, low tech

Last edited by mattinmd; 07-08-2015 at 07:56 PM. Reason: repost
mattinmd is offline  
post #11 of 19 (permalink) Old 07-10-2015, 03:15 AM Thread Starter
Algae Grower
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: uk
Posts: 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by mattinmd View Post
Bringing RO up to be good for fish? You could get away with a GH booster (calcium, magnesium, potassium, and sulfate), and an alkalinity booster (sodium bicarbonate).

For plants: You'll need to add nitrate, phosphate, and micronutrients (Fe, Cu, Zn, B, Mn, and Chloride) and possibly traces (Co, Ni, Mo ) as well. Na is also a micronutrient, but the alkalinity booster usually provides plenty.

But if you're thinking RO is going to cure your algae problems... be aware it probably won't.

Nutrient limiting isn't generally a good approach to controlling algae in planted tanks, at least in any kind of long term.. Algae need all the same nutrients that plants do, which makes sense since algae is a plant. If you take away something to kill the algae, you'll eventually kill your plants too. Unless you're dealing with non-algae problems like diatoms (which need silicates that plants don't need), this usually doesn't work out in the long term.
Thanks for the info.
I think i need another approach to algae then.
I will have to have a good read on the forum.
Thanks for all your replies.
Off for a read
jacko5 is offline  
post #12 of 19 (permalink) Old 07-10-2015, 01:35 PM
Planted Tank Guru
 
PTrader: (3/100%)
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Maryland, USA
Posts: 2,339
You're welcome...

Some general bits as starting points:

1) Light and CO2 levels are a very significant factor in most kinds of algae.. One of these is usually the first knob you should be looking at. These two generally balance each other, so if you're not injecting CO2, look at lighting.

2) There's some really good links to algae info in the Algae forum sticky post. These will help you identify different kinds of algae, and suggest possible causes. Note that the sites do sometimes contradict each other. Nobody fully understands algae growth, so there's some ambiguous areas out there, and it shows.

3) Vigorous plant growth tends to suppress many forms of algae. The exact mechanism isn't understood, but it is well observed by many. Tom Barr is a strong proponent of the "make your plants healthy and unless you've got something really off in your light/co2 levels, the algae will usually go away" approach. I tend to agree with him, at least for 99% of situations this seems to work.

4) Nutrient overdose generally doesn't cause algae, otherwise everyone using EI would have an algae farm, myself included. However there is some possibility for wild imbalances to trigger algae... stick to a balanced dosing regime, tweaked mildly based on plant behavior and you should be fine.. Jacking up one nutrient in a tank way beyond the needs of plants and leaving everything else low isn't usually a good idea.

New to planted tanks, avid gardener/tinkerer.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Fluval C4 + Quietflow 30, Finnex Planted+ with
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
, low-tech.
10 gallon secondary tank with Finnex stingray with
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
, AC20, low tech
mattinmd is offline  
post #13 of 19 (permalink) Old 07-10-2015, 04:48 PM
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
micheljq's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Quebec
Posts: 963
Quote:
Originally Posted by mattinmd View Post
Nutrient limiting isn't generally a good approach to controlling algae in planted tanks, at least in any kind of long term.. Algae need all the same nutrients that plants do, which makes sense since algae is a plant. If you take away something to kill the algae, you'll eventually kill your plants too. Unless you're dealing with non-algae problems like diatoms (which need silicates that plants don't need), this usually doesn't work out in the long term.
Totally agree, nutrient limiting i tried in the past and the only thing i was able to limit was the plants, not algae.

Algae need so little to thrive that the plants will decay well before algae are affected, in fact algae will thrive even better than before because the plants are not there anymore to compete.

Michel.

Plants and algae grower.
micheljq is offline  
post #14 of 19 (permalink) Old 07-10-2015, 07:09 PM
Planted Tank Guru
 
PTrader: (84/100%)
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 21,012
Quote:
Originally Posted by jacko5 View Post
d

Thanks.
I have just checked my timer, they are on for 7 hours at 60% and 50%
Then an hour either side at 20% on the blue channel.
I think that is not to much but i may be wrong.
I am now thinking of a RO System and adding the stuff the fish need to the water.
Can anyone tell me what i would have to put in the water to make it Ok for the fish after the water has run through a RO system ?
You can buy a really cheap lux meter on Ebay or Amazon, or a few other places, about $20, and set your lights up temporarily out in the air, propped on stacks of books so they are the same distance from the lux meter sensor as they are from the substrate when they are on the tank. Measure the lux, and divide the reading by 65 for a crude measure of the PAR in the tank. Then you will be much better able to adjust the lights to get close to the amount of light you want, without so much guessing. Is that worth $20, or whatever it is where you are?

Hoppy
Hoppy is offline  
post #15 of 19 (permalink) Old 07-10-2015, 11:02 PM
Planted Tank Guru
 
Maryland Guppy's Avatar
 
PTrader: (15/100%)
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Arnold
Posts: 3,682
Phone apps are free for a lux meter too.
Download several and compare them.
Using a lux meter at work then comparing to phone are pretty close.
I have also used Hoppy's suggestion just without the $20 expense.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Growing is not that difficult.
Maryland Guppy is offline  
Reply

Tags
None

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Planted Tank Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome