EI + CO2 + Excell - The Planted Tank Forum
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post #1 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-14-2014, 09:08 AM Thread Starter
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Lightbulb EI + CO2 + Excell

Hi all. I am High Tech owner.
Dosing EI, Injecting Pressurized CO2 and want to add Excell for extra liquid carbon. Can somebody help to set the dosage of excell ?
My tank is 320 liters
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post #2 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-14-2014, 11:06 AM
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If you're injecting CO2, you don't need Excel. Just up your bps. CO2 is way cheaper than Excel...


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post #3 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-14-2014, 02:03 PM
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Agreed, adding excel strictly as a carbon source on top of CO2 is silly. It is harder for the plants to use, can damage some plants, and is more expensive.

That said, many of the CO2 folks do use excel as an algecide, mostly applied as a spot-treatment to things like black beard algae.
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post #4 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-14-2014, 05:27 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mattinmd View Post
Agreed, adding excel strictly as a carbon source on top of CO2 is silly. It is harder for the plants to use, can damage some plants, and is more expensive.

That said, many of the CO2 folks do use excel as an algecide, mostly applied as a spot-treatment to things like black beard algae.
what is a spot treatment?
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post #5 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-14-2014, 05:30 PM
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what is a spot treatment?
You fill up a dropper or syringe with Excel and apply it directly on the algae problem area.
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post #6 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-14-2014, 05:36 PM
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Spot treatment is an algae control technique.

It involves using an eyedroper, pipete or soda straw to directly apply the excel to something in the tank with algae growing on it. Overall quantities applied shouldn't exceed what you'd do for tank-wide treatment. Spot treatment is also done on an as needed and where needed basis, instead of daily.

Since you're doing this underwater it will quickly dissipate across the tank, but you are at least ensuring that the spot with the algae is getting the maximum possible exposure to the dose. It generally is more effective for algae control than dumping it excel on top and waiting for it to spread to where the algae is.
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post #7 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-14-2014, 07:02 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mattinmd View Post
Spot treatment is an algae control technique.

It involves using an eyedroper, pipete or soda straw to directly apply the excel to something in the tank with algae growing on it. Overall quantities applied shouldn't exceed what you'd do for tank-wide treatment. Spot treatment is also done on an as needed and where needed basis, instead of daily.

Since you're doing this underwater it will quickly dissipate across the tank, but you are at least ensuring that the spot with the algae is getting the maximum possible exposure to the dose. It generally is more effective for algae control than dumping it excel on top and waiting for it to spread to where the algae is.
wery interesting so i see the point to have a small quantity of excell for that kind of tretment
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post #8 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-15-2014, 06:14 PM
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It could be beneficial if you have very high light, and plants still show deficiency symptoms at the max bps the inhabitants can handle. It may give you that little extra carbon that the plants need without gassing the livestock.
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post #9 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-15-2014, 07:50 PM
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Some plants, Val comes to mind, are very susceptible to excel.

The wheel turns.
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post #10 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-16-2014, 05:31 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by DayOlder View Post
Some plants, Val comes to mind, are very susceptible to excel.
I grow HC Ricia, microsoriums, althernathera reinicki mini, blixia japonica, pogostemon erectus, pogostemos helferi, limpnophila hipuridoides, limnophila aquatica, and some plant cant identify later will try to post some pics in forum for indentification of the plants.

by the way i am doing wery bad with microsorium pteropus and narow... i think to much light, my tank is 320 liters ang has 6 bulbs t5 HO 39 W
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post #11 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-16-2014, 06:41 PM
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Yes, those ferns are better if you can keep them under some of the other plants. They do not like as much light as many other plants.
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post #12 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-16-2014, 08:44 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Diana View Post
Yes, those ferns are better if you can keep them under some of the other plants. They do not like as much light as many other plants.
In the nearest future i have a plan to remove them from the tank. but still looking at those pictures on the web, how microsorium looks when they are healthy grown... stunning...
So the question is how to plant the other plants above them?
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post #13 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-17-2014, 04:44 AM Thread Starter
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One more thing, how to determine that the livestock i mean fishes is gasping due to low air and high co2?
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post #14 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-17-2014, 11:45 AM
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I'm going to assume you meant low air or high CO2.. perhaps I've read you wrong.

It is high CO2 that makes them gasp. If you hold your breath, it is high CO2 in your bloodstream, not low O2, that creates that "suffocating" feeling.

If you somehow created a low oxygen, low CO2 environment, your fish would drift peacefully off to sleep (and possibly not wake up). This is not easy to do, you'd probably need to be aerating the tank with nitrogen to do this.

Some fish naturally suck air at the surface, ie: gouramis and betas are labyrinth fish, so this is normal for them.

Last edited by mattinmd; 11-17-2014 at 01:32 PM. Reason: added my assumption of OR not and.
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post #15 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-17-2014, 03:28 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mattinmd View Post
I'm going to assume you meant low air or high CO2.. perhaps I've read you wrong.

It is high CO2 that makes them gasp. If you hold your breath, it is high CO2 in your bloodstream, not low O2, that creates that "suffocating" feeling.

If you somehow created a low oxygen, low CO2 environment, your fish would drift peacefully off to sleep (and possibly not wake up). This is not easy to do, you'd probably need to be aerating the tank with nitrogen to do this.

Some fish naturally suck air at the surface, ie: gouramis and betas are labyrinth fish, so this is normal for them.
Wery interesting, never thought about it but sounds good. so how to know that my co2 level is to high? before the fishes went to sleep forever
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