High Ammonia how to lower it - The Planted Tank Forum
 
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post #1 of 7 (permalink) Old 11-10-2014, 02:44 AM Thread Starter
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High Ammonia how to lower it

I have a 29 gallon month and a half old Aquarium. So I set up the tank, waited until the temp was stable. Added Plants. I waited a week, added media from my year and a half old 20 gallon. Put my betta in there (to provide ammonia). The Ammonia was at zero for a few days. Went to Petco, and I bought 10 Ghost Shrimp and 2 Rili shrimp. Waited another week then added 5 Assassin Snails. The Shrimp have been in the tank for about 2 weeks.

Other than the Ammonia everything else has remain consistent. PH has not spiked since I set up the tank. I am worried. Shrimp don't do well with Ammonia. My Betta is really active. I need some ways to lower it. I have added some sand and gravel from the other tank (more bacteria). Nothing is helping. The spike hasn't went above .25ppm (knock on wood). I just need advice.

Parameters
Ammonia- .25ppm
Nitrites- 0
Nitrate- 5ppm
PH- 7.8
Temp- 75F

4 gallon water change every two weeks. Using Distilled water (most stable PH).

The Tank has 3 Amazon Swords (two have lots of new leaves, the third looks like it dying.), 1 full grown red melon Sword (1 baby (Planted) and another on that stem that I am waiting for roots to develop), 1 java fern with plantlets, 1 dwarf lily, 2 small chain swords (just starting new leaves).

Ferts- Flourish Complete (Mon. and Thurs.), Root tabs, Flourish Iron (Mon. and Thurs.)

8- Ghost Shrimp, 1 betta, 5 Assassin Snails, 2- rili shrimp (Petco said they were ghosts, I asked for ghosts)
Tank:
Light- Corallife T5 10,000 and Actinic Bulbs, Ecocomplete substratem, Sponge Filter
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post #2 of 7 (permalink) Old 11-10-2014, 03:10 AM
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Nearly instant measures, but with no long-term control:

- Do water changes... a 20% water change will immediately lower your ammonia by 20% (assuming the water doesn't contain any). Fish only I'd say do 50%, but I understand that shrimp don't generally like big water changes (I am not a shrimp keeper)..

- You can also use Prime to neutralize it, which works pretty fast.



Less instant, but more permanent effect measures:


- add more used media, gravel or ornaments to introduce more bacteria

- use tetra safestart or Dr. Tim's one and only bacteria-bottles (be careful which products you use, not all contain bacteria that will thrive long term)

Major effort but will "start it off right" -
- move the inhabitants back out to a well cycled tank (assuming you have the space) and do an ammonia based fishless cycle, or fish-in cycle with hardy fish.
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post #3 of 7 (permalink) Old 11-10-2014, 06:01 AM
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Smile Kinda What Matt Said

Hi,

At 75F and pH 7.8, 0.25-ppm ammonia is dangerous.

Large water changes, 50% plus every couple of days, reduced feeding until the biological filtration catches up.

If you can let the temperature drop a couple of degrees (F).

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post #4 of 7 (permalink) Old 11-11-2014, 02:41 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mattinmd View Post
Nearly instant measures, but with no long-term control:

- Do water changes... a 20% water change will immediately lower your ammonia by 20% (assuming the water doesn't contain any). Fish only I'd say do 50%, but I understand that shrimp don't generally like big water changes (I am not a shrimp keeper)..

- You can also use Prime to neutralize it, which works pretty fast.



Less instant, but more permanent effect measures:


- add more used media, gravel or ornaments to introduce more bacteria

- use tetra safestart or Dr. Tim's one and only bacteria-bottles (be careful which products you use, not all contain bacteria that will thrive long term)

Major effort but will "start it off right" -
- move the inhabitants back out to a well cycled tank (assuming you have the space) and do an ammonia based fishless cycle, or fish-in cycle with hardy fish.
I would try to move them; however the shrimp may be attacked or eaten. I know kuhlis don't normally go after shrimp, but there is that chance. Same with the Tetras, nipping the bettas fins.

Not to mention that tank is crowded as is. 20g with 6 bloodfins and 3 kuhlis.

So far the shrimp seem really active and very bold, and have been molting

I guess water changes and hope for the best is all I really got.

By the way does anyone know how to lower PH slowly. I would love to have mine at about 7.4.
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post #5 of 7 (permalink) Old 11-11-2014, 03:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nightshade259 View Post
By the way does anyone know how to lower PH slowly. I would love to have mine at about 7.4.
If the pH is high because the KH is high, water changes using distilled or RO/DI water will lower the pH. Do small changes, a small change each day, and you will slowly lower the pH. If the high KH is from rocks in the tank that are carbonate rocks, then you first have to remove the rocks.

Hoppy
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post #6 of 7 (permalink) Old 11-11-2014, 03:09 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Hoppy View Post
If the pH is high because the KH is high, water changes using distilled or RO/DI water will lower the pH. Do small changes, a small change each day, and you will slowly lower the pH. If the high KH is from rocks in the tank that are carbonate rocks, then you first have to remove the rocks.
The Only thing I use is eco-complete. Would that be causing the high KH
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post #7 of 7 (permalink) Old 11-12-2014, 03:31 AM
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My ammonia is bobbing up to 0.25ppm at present - if I add a capful of Seachem Stability, it is back to zero (or undetectable) after several hours, then creeps up.... I'm not sure if it is the Stability doing it though.
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