Is my tank cycled? - The Planted Tank Forum
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 13 (permalink) Old 07-26-2014, 07:06 PM Thread Starter
Planted Tank Guru
 
klibs's Avatar
 
PTrader: (29/100%)
Join Date: May 2014
Location: NH
Posts: 3,325
Is my tank cycled?

75 Gallon
Dry start method with HC 6/5/14 - 7/5/14 (filled the tank ~20 days ago)
I have added a bunch of plants and am blasting CO2
Have not added any ammonia or fish at all.

Nitrite - 0
Ammonia - 0
Nitrate - ~50 PPM (I know I need to do more frequent water changes)

Does this mean my tank is cycled? I have read dry start method can produce the bacteria needed and jump start the process...

I have done multiple tests in the past few weeks and my nitrates are varied (always at least 20) while ammonia / nitrite stay at 0.
klibs is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 13 (permalink) Old 07-26-2014, 07:13 PM
Planted Member
 
LuckyCharm's Avatar
 
PTrader: (14/100%)
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Matawan NJ
Posts: 263
A cycled tank w0sgouodnt have any ammonia nor nitrite. Nitrate will always be present in a cycled tank.
Looks like you're good to go

Show us some picture of the HC!
LuckyCharm is offline  
post #3 of 13 (permalink) Old 07-26-2014, 11:50 PM
Planted Tank Guru
 
Zorfox's Avatar
 
PTrader: (5/100%)
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Gainesville, FL
Posts: 2,105
Are you dosing fertilizers which would explain the nitrates?

Without any organics to feed the nitrogen process it's hard to say. Try adding some ammonia and see if it disappears within 24 hours. That would mean your tank is cycled. I can have 0 ammonia, 0 nitrites and 100ppm of nitrate in a clean glass of water within 1 minute. Doesn't mean it's cycled.
Zorfox is offline  
 
post #4 of 13 (permalink) Old 07-27-2014, 12:22 AM
Planted Tank Guru
 
discuspaul's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Posts: 3,402
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zorfox View Post
Are you dosing fertilizers which would explain the nitrates?

Without any organics to feed the nitrogen process it's hard to say. Try adding some ammonia and see if it disappears within 24 hours. That would mean your tank is cycled. I can have 0 ammonia, 0 nitrites and 100ppm of nitrate in a clean glass of water within 1 minute. Doesn't mean it's cycled.
+1 - Add some ammonia & test.
discuspaul is offline  
post #5 of 13 (permalink) Old 07-27-2014, 12:31 AM
Wannabe Guru
 
greaser84's Avatar
 
PTrader: (11/100%)
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: NC
Posts: 1,425
I don't think you are cycled, without a source of ammonia the beneficial bacteria don't have anything to feed on and grow. Definitely add some ammonia and test.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
greaser84 is offline  
post #6 of 13 (permalink) Old 07-27-2014, 02:24 AM
Wannabe Guru
 
Higher Thinking's Avatar
 
PTrader: (23/100%)
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Oregon State Beavers!
Posts: 1,533
Quote:
Originally Posted by LuckyCharm View Post
A cycled tank w0sgouodnt have any ammonia nor nitrite. Nitrate will always be present in a cycled tank.
Looks like you're good to go

Show us some picture of the HC!
I have to politely disagree. As other posters have mentioned, you haven't been adding any ammonia source so it it's impossible to have a cycled tank. Unfortunately the last twenty days have likely been a waste. You can only keep the bacteria alive by providing an ammonia source, e.g. pure ammonia, fish food, fish, etc. If there has never been ammonia put into the tank, the bacteria never developed. I would figure out why you have nitrates. Dosing, maybe?


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Higher Thinking is offline  
post #7 of 13 (permalink) Old 07-27-2014, 02:53 AM
Planted Member
 
Aqua nut's Avatar
 
PTrader: (5/100%)
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Greenacres Florida
Posts: 260
Who in there right mind would ever put ammonia in there fish tank to start a cycle???? lol
google- API Quick start.
Limits toxic ammonia & Nitrites .
Immediately starts aquarium cycle
Contains live nitrifying bacteria.
I use this in all my 5 tanks 1-55 gallon 1 40 g breeder 2-29 gal. and 1 20 gal.
Never had a problem.
http://www.apifishcare.com/product.php?p=videos&id=618
Aqua nut is offline  
post #8 of 13 (permalink) Old 07-27-2014, 03:32 AM
Planted Tank Guru
 
discuspaul's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Posts: 3,402
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aqua nut View Post
Who in there right mind would ever put ammonia in there fish tank to start a cycle???? lol
google- API Quick start.
Limits toxic ammonia & Nitrites .
Immediately starts aquarium cycle
Contains live nitrifying bacteria.
I use this in all my 5 tanks 1-55 gallon 1 40 g breeder 2-29 gal. and 1 20 gal.
Never had a problem.
http://www.apifishcare.com/product.php?p=videos&id=618
You've been lucky - doesn't usually happen as easily and successfully as that.
discuspaul is offline  
post #9 of 13 (permalink) Old 07-27-2014, 05:02 AM
Planted Tank Guru
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Contra Costa CA
Posts: 11,721
Quote:
Who in there right mind would ever put ammonia in there fish tank to start a cycle?
Note misspelling, too. 'there' is a location. You mean their, a possessive.

Lots of us.

We prefer to cycle a tank over a bit of time, allowing many different microorganisms to develop, allow the plants time to root, allow the substrate a chance to develop its ecology, and in other ways make sure the tank is ready for fish.

The fishless cycle, using ammonia, is a very valuable tool for getting an aquarium started. It grows the necessary bacteria, and enforces a waiting period that allows many other things to get settled.

The bacteria in a bottle products are good, if they contain the right species of bacteria (Nitrospira), but even then it is just one part of the system. Many other microorganisms also need to get established in the tank.

I prefer to wait, make sure things are stable.
Diana is offline  
post #10 of 13 (permalink) Old 07-27-2014, 06:11 AM
Wannabe Guru
 
Higher Thinking's Avatar
 
PTrader: (23/100%)
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Oregon State Beavers!
Posts: 1,533
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aqua nut View Post
Who in there right mind would ever put ammonia in there fish tank to start a cycle???? lol
google- API Quick start.
Limits toxic ammonia & Nitrites .
Immediately starts aquarium cycle
Contains live nitrifying bacteria.
I use this in all my 5 tanks 1-55 gallon 1 40 g breeder 2-29 gal. and 1 20 gal.
Never had a problem.
http://www.apifishcare.com/product.php?p=videos&id=618
There are LOTS of people who put ammonia in their tank. It doesn't cost anything (well a bottle of ammonia costs 1 dollar at the Dollar Tree, but will last a lifetime), it properly establishes an aquarium, and like already mentioned, it gives adequate time for everything to get established. Unfortunately you seem to not understand how fish keeping works. Fish waste and decomposing plants create ammonia in your tank. That is what feeds these bacteria from your bottle. Pure ammonia is actually cleaner than fish waste. After all, fish waste is ammonia plus other stuff. So either way, you are adding ammonia into your tank, whether it's from your fish and plants or whether you add it directly.

However, I don't discredit instant cycle products, but I usually don't care if a tank takes a long time to cycle. Personally I usually add media from an established tank and then add ammonia to keep the bacteria alive until I'm ready to add fish.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Higher Thinking is offline  
post #11 of 13 (permalink) Old 07-27-2014, 01:48 PM
Algae Grower
 
domino's Avatar
 
PTrader: (3/100%)
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Tucson, AZ
Posts: 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aqua nut View Post
Who in there right mind would ever put ammonia in there fish tank to start a cycle???? lol
Tons of people, that is who. I will never use that instant cycle in bottle stuff. I don't trust it to cycle my tank.
domino is offline  
post #12 of 13 (permalink) Old 07-28-2014, 12:22 AM
Planted Tank Guru
 
PTrader: (84/100%)
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 21,015
If you have growing plants in an aquarium, and a light load of fish, it isn't necessary to do anything to cycle the tank. Cycling is a natural process that occurs whenever there is any ammonia in the tank water, as there would be with a light fish load. The growing plants will consume most of the ammonia as a source of nitrogen anyway, so no surge of ammonia in the water will occur. Now, when you add a few more fish, the increase in ammonia from those added fish will cause further growth of the ammonia to nitrate bacteria, and, again, the plants will consume most of the ammonia anyway. Once you build up the fish population to the final load, the tank will have the bacteria population needed to handle that ammonia load, and the plants will continue to use up much of that ammonia as plant food.

But, if you don't use growing plants, or if you plan to dump in a heavy fish load all over a short time span, then cycling the tank is essential. Since this is a "planted tank" forum, this is going to be a rare occurrence for those reading here.

Hoppy
Hoppy is offline  
post #13 of 13 (permalink) Old 07-28-2014, 01:19 AM Thread Starter
Planted Tank Guru
 
klibs's Avatar
 
PTrader: (29/100%)
Join Date: May 2014
Location: NH
Posts: 3,325
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoppy View Post
If you have growing plants in an aquarium, and a light load of fish, it isn't necessary to do anything to cycle the tank. Cycling is a natural process that occurs whenever there is any ammonia in the tank water, as there would be with a light fish load. The growing plants will consume most of the ammonia as a source of nitrogen anyway, so no surge of ammonia in the water will occur. Now, when you add a few more fish, the increase in ammonia from those added fish will cause further growth of the ammonia to nitrate bacteria, and, again, the plants will consume most of the ammonia anyway. Once you build up the fish population to the final load, the tank will have the bacteria population needed to handle that ammonia load, and the plants will continue to use up much of that ammonia as plant food.

But, if you don't use growing plants, or if you plan to dump in a heavy fish load all over a short time span, then cycling the tank is essential. Since this is a "planted tank" forum, this is going to be a rare occurrence for those reading here.
Thanks Hoppy

Yes - I have been dosing which makes sense why I have a nitrate reading
I am going to be adding a little bit of ammonia in the next few days to see what happens to my tank. Not really concerned that the last 20 days were a 'waste' as I am patient enough to wait and stock my tank. It still looks very nice with just the plants in there.

Current pic of HC / tank status:
klibs is offline  
Reply

Tags
None

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Planted Tank Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome