Bringing my ph down - The Planted Tank Forum
 
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post #1 of 12 (permalink) Old 05-28-2008, 07:02 AM Thread Starter
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Bringing my ph down

I use my tap water for fish tanks and have a ph of about 8. This is what my ph is locally around town and I had never thought about chainging it but have heard it should be around 7. Is there any product I could use to change it to a 7 ish without damaging my fish or plants?
Thanks for the replies.


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post #2 of 12 (permalink) Old 05-28-2008, 07:32 AM
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different fish from around the world come from different enviornments. their natural waters all have their own ph values. your ph is just fine. most all fish will aclimate to this and live healthily. the catch is that a lot of fish like to breed in ph values that are close what they would experience in the wild.

adding ph down chemicals is a big headache and is not worth it, it just ends up being more stressful to the fish. the ph ends up bouncing up and down in the process. i would not use any "product" to try and lower ph. i would leave it as is and not give it another worry.
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post #3 of 12 (permalink) Old 05-28-2008, 03:04 PM Thread Starter
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Ok cool thanks Discus.


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post #4 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-11-2008, 05:25 AM
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any natural way to lower it? like heavy planted, substrate, wood?

how about pH with shrimps? like CRS and RCS...

ITS NEVER ENOUGH!!!
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post #5 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-11-2008, 06:30 AM
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some people have success with bogwood and peat moss, i have tried both and had no success with either, remember if you have a high KH in your water as well, then it is very difficult to lower your ph as the water is highly buffered. All natural ways are the best way to lower ph however if these dont work your best bet is to try and use RO water so your water isnt hard and then lower it, only if you are keeping specialty fish such as discus is this super important. as discus said most fish are adaptable
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post #6 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-12-2008, 03:51 AM
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Before I added wood to my tank, my Ph always increased from the source to the aquarium. It took me some time to realize that it was because of my substrate.

CO2 dropped it temporarily, but it always went back up. It wasn't until the addition of the wood that everything stabilized.
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post #7 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-17-2008, 07:35 AM
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wyeto,

I have very hard/alkaline tap water as well, around pH 7.8, dGH 9, unfortunately I like mostly fish who enjoy soft, acidic water! So I have done a lot of experimenting with water.

As discus said, most fish will adapt, however some species are more sensitive. While you may not be trying to breed fish who like acidic water, most species that come from acidic waters will definitely enjoy a lower pH/GH and will show a lot more color. For example, my Rasbora espei first spawned in pH 7.8, but now I regularly breed them in pH 6.4, and they are way more colorful and much more prolific.

Basically if you want to lower the pH, you need RO as markopolo said. You can add pH buffer all day long to your tap water but the pH will just go back up due to the hardness.

Personally I use a simple RO unit from eBay ($100 roughly) and then add a little bit of Seachem buffer powder, and by a little I mean like a pinch per gallon. This will prevent large pH fluctuations. This will get you really nice, soft water for pretty cheap. You can get the Seachem pH regulator at PetSmart for $10, and it will last you forever.

If you want to monkey with RO, go to your local supermarkets and find one that has a drinking water dispenser... Usually those are actually RO, here it's about $0.39 a gallon.
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post #8 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-17-2008, 04:41 PM
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I was just going to ask a question about high pH. What does RO mean? I changed out my substrate to eco-complete and added a piece of driftwood in my tank two weeks ago. The pH has been stable around 7.2-7.4 but I just checked it today and it is 8.0 Not sure why it has increased.

Should I be concerned about this or just leave it alone?
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post #9 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-17-2008, 05:57 PM
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RO stands for Reverse Osmosis water...confused me to. I fill my own 5 gal carboys at the grocery store. My water has a ph of 9 . I mix 2/3 tap with 1/3 RO. Brings the ph to 7. KH is fine due to my water but I ad Seachem equilibrium to bring up the GH. Warm it up with a heater overnight and then add it the tank the next day.

If you cannot keep daphnia alive...I wouldn't even trust you with my pet rock!

Check out my Daphnia Farm

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post #10 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-17-2008, 06:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by diyer3984 View Post
RO stands for Reverse Osmosis water...confused me to. I fill my own 5 gal carboys at the grocery store. My water has a ph of 9 . I mix 2/3 tap with 1/3 RO. Brings the ph to 7. KH is fine due to my water but I ad Seachem equilibrium to bring up the GH. Warm it up with a heater overnight and then add it the tank the next day.
How does that work? Pre-C02, the pH of RO is ~7, so 67% pH9 + 33% pH7 is not going to = ~pH7.

Is your pH7 after adding C02?


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post #11 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-18-2008, 06:17 PM
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Dont know how it works but all the math in the world wont save you. It is like cooking...following only the directions will give you any meal...but following your instinct's will give you a culinary masterpiece. Seriously not sure how it works (too many variables = aquarium). This is all pre CO2...
GOLD STAR FOR POINTING THAT OUT THOUGH!

If you cannot keep daphnia alive...I wouldn't even trust you with my pet rock!

Check out my Daphnia Farm

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post #12 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-18-2008, 07:45 PM
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Many municipal water suppliers raise the pH so it doesn't corrode the metal pipes. They do this with sodium hydroxide (NaOH). You can neutralize it with Hydrochloric acid (HCl) which will leave you with water and table salt as the only byproducts. This won't keep the pH where you want because your tank will have a profound effect on it, but it will give you pH neutral water to start with. pH down chemicals are often weak acids and are not good for competing with sodium hydroxide which is a strong base. You need a strong acid to compete with a strong base and permanently neutralize it. I use 3 drops of half strength (6 molar) hydrochloric acid per gallon. It drops the tap water pH from 8 to 7 and then I use CO2 to hold it at 7.

And R/O water is typically at a pH in the 6 range, because it absorbs CO2. And mixing it gives much more complicated results than just a straight percentage because pH is on a logarithmic scale so it increases or decreases exponentially. To really do it, you'd need to calculate the concentration of hydrogen ions in each source of water from the pH, then figure your concentration after mixing them, then take that concentration to figure out the final pH of the mixture.


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