Total CO2 emitted by fish - The Planted Tank Forum
 
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post #1 of 6 (permalink) Old 06-07-2014, 04:47 AM Thread Starter
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Total CO2 emitted by fish

Has anyone studied how much NPK and CO2 is emitted by aquarium fish?

I am interested in some sort Excel spreadsheet in which I can quantify how much fish food, CO2, or waste results in total NPK or CO2 in solution with tank water.
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post #2 of 6 (permalink) Old 06-07-2014, 05:10 AM
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Originally Posted by AirstoND View Post
Has anyone studied how much NPK and CO2 is emitted by aquarium fish?

I am interested in some sort Excel spreadsheet in which I can quantify how much fish food, CO2, or waste results in total NPK or CO2 in solution with tank water.
Hmm, I don't think there is a spread sheet on this that I have found. But I do remember reading a while back that it would take nearly 50 one to two inch fish to produce enough co2 for one 6-8 inch plant daily, don't quote me on that though. But it has always been my understanding that fish will not produce enough co2 to account for anything in your aquarium, even when the power goes out most fish die because of the ammonia, heat or ph swings not because they are producing too much co2.

As for the food aspect, you will probably run into problems with your fish's health and the cleanliness of your aquarium before you see too many advantages from overfeeding fish food as a fertilizer. The excess food will literally have to rot and decompose before it is of any use to the plants, and the process will probably be bad for your fish if you are over feeding to the point to try and use fish food as a fertilizer.

You may however be able to find something that will help you out from your state or city aquarium, give them a call and chat with them for a little while. They have to have a way to keep track of all the stuff that is going on in their waters and I am sure they are using some sort of spread sheet or computer program to aid them.
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post #3 of 6 (permalink) Old 06-07-2014, 06:19 AM
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Hardly any CO2 from fish relative to plants.

NPK, just use the fish food used to measure this, what goes in, must come out, less roughly 10% for growing fish. Adults, maybe 5%.

Then you measure the weight of food, then the % of NPK in the food, just like ferts.




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Tom Barr
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post #4 of 6 (permalink) Old 06-07-2014, 09:25 PM
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Fish food is a pretty good source of most nutrients, for a low tech tank.
It is low in Fe, K and Ca.

Water changes should take care of the Ca, as long as the GH is at least 3 German degrees of hardness.

When I started with plants, very low tech, the first deficiencies I found were K and Fe.
So I also added C (Excel).

As I improved the lighting and reduced the fish load I found the plants also needed all the other nutrients, and higher doses of C, K and Fe.
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post #5 of 6 (permalink) Old 06-07-2014, 10:11 PM
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Great advise here!

As far as CO2 addition from fish forget it. <---PERIOD! It's inconsequential.

Balancing fish food, bio-load, and other parameters for the plant's health and minimal maintenance? Probably the most difficult tank to pull off IMO.

We can test for Nitrate and phosphate pretty easily. Those are the two things we see from food and waste. We typically don't get much potassium and traces from bio waste so those additions are usually needed as Diana said. Minerals like calcium and magnesium can be from water changes. So small amounts of traces, potassium and if need be Ca & Mg seem appropriate.

Yes, I realize that saying a low tech tank is harder than a high tech is crazy. But it is what it is. Low tech seems to require more finesse and attention where high tech requires more brute strength. Just my two cents of course.
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post #6 of 6 (permalink) Old 06-09-2014, 05:28 AM
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Originally Posted by Zorfox View Post
Great advise here!

As far as CO2 addition from fish forget it. <---PERIOD! It's inconsequential.

Balancing fish food, bio-load, and other parameters for the plant's health and minimal maintenance? Probably the most difficult tank to pull off IMO.

We can test for Nitrate and phosphate pretty easily. Those are the two things we see from food and waste. We typically don't get much potassium and traces from bio waste so those additions are usually needed as Diana said. Minerals like calcium and magnesium can be from water changes. So small amounts of traces, potassium and if need be Ca & Mg seem appropriate.

Yes, I realize that saying a low tech tank is harder than a high tech is crazy. But it is what it is. Low tech seems to require more finesse and attention where high tech requires more brute strength. Just my two cents of course.
If you consider tank maintenance then high light tanks are harder to do well than low light tank. But, if you enjoy the routine tank maintenance tasks, you will probably do them as often and as thoroughly for low light tanks as for high light tanks.

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