Seaweed Extract - The Planted Tank Forum
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post #1 of 25 (permalink) Old 05-29-2006, 07:47 AM Thread Starter
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Seaweed Extract

Has anyone tried using liquid seaweed extract as fertiliser in their planted tank? It works wonders for garden plants and I'm curious to know if it is safe to use in aquariums. The seaweed extract we have locally is called Seasol and is made from sea kelp.

There is a PDF available with analysis of the product found here. It has a fair amount of Iron (300ppm) and Iodine in it as well (120ppm) and stacks of other trace elements. I did notice that it is fairly alkaline (9.5-10.5 pH) so it may adjust pH levels over time.
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post #2 of 25 (permalink) Old 05-29-2006, 12:34 PM
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Besides having 9 or 10 things (including iodine) I'm not too sure I'd want in my tank, it certainly doesn't look like it allows for separate dosing of macros and micros.

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post #3 of 25 (permalink) Old 05-29-2006, 03:08 PM
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Why add anything to the tank unless you believe it will solve some problem you have? Fertilizing isn't difficult just using basic, cheap chemicals, so I haven't seen a reason to look for an alternative.

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post #4 of 25 (permalink) Old 05-30-2006, 02:18 AM
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Ooo the burning question. I found a package of some seaweed mix in some seeds I'd forgotten I had. Ooops. I kinda figured it ranked up there with fish emulsion though for plant fertilizer.

Now, what I want to know is has anyone been brave enough to see if SuperThrive is safe. I've heard some amusing results from overdoing it on garden plants (it's not a fertilizer; more of a vitamin supplement).

BTW, for those of us who are "organic", the word "chemical" has a whole bunch of unpleasant associations and also brings about the question: There are oodles of organic alternatives for our garden plants - alfalfa meal, blood and bone meals, sea weed, fish emulsion, various manures. Why has nobody come up with an alternative for our aquarium plants? (well, besides feeding the fish too much)

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post #5 of 25 (permalink) Old 05-30-2006, 02:59 AM
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Hmm.. interesting question. To me, something as simple as nitrate, phosphate or potassium sulfate is about as basic and clean as it gets. You're talking about one or two different elements in each compound. Is this worse than organic, or is it as clean? To me, it sounds clean.
No methylethylbadstuff, just what is needed....

30g planted with cories, white clouds, Harlequin Rasboras ,ottos.
10g planted with glowlight tetras and an otto.
Outdoor pond with one common goldfish and comets.
5.5g with endlers.
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post #6 of 25 (permalink) Old 05-30-2006, 03:09 AM Thread Starter
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I just saw it as a possible simplified means to replace the other fertilising methods people use. It only costs ~$12AUS for a litre and far cheaper then buying Seachem or Duplaplant.
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post #7 of 25 (permalink) Old 05-30-2006, 03:34 AM
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Using dry ferts is cheaper than $12 a litre... probably about by $11.65 or more, for the same nutrients.

The thing about organics is that you're adding organic matter to a closed and limited system, and not on the ground in your garden which is connected to the continent on which you live. I know that hydroponic growers use a lot of organic fertilizers and you could probably grow some pretty good plants using the same stuff, but I doubt they have livestock in their water.
When you get right down to it, a person is adding that organic stuff in hydroponics because it contains the same chemicals that most of us add straight. They probably need some of the extra mojo that comes with the organic ferts because they don't have some of the natural processes where they grow their plants that we have going on by their own accord in the aquarium.

That and I am not going to dose bat poop for phosphates.

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post #8 of 25 (permalink) Old 05-30-2006, 05:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TINNGG
...BTW, for those of us who are "organic", the word "chemical" has a whole bunch of unpleasant associations...
At this very moment, your aquarium may contain potentially dangerous levels of dihydrogen monoxide (DHMO)!!! Read more about it here: http://www.dhmo.org/
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post #9 of 25 (permalink) Old 05-30-2006, 02:23 PM
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We are all free to experiment with whatever equipment or fertilizers we want to try. So, if someone wants to try a seaweed extract in their tank, then they should do so, but all of us benefit when the results of such trials are reported here. So, my vote is for Gordow trying the stuff, but promising to let us know what happens when he does. A lot of things that sound "wrong" are found to work well by some people - using cat litter as a substrate, for example.

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post #10 of 25 (permalink) Old 05-30-2006, 02:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ransom
At this very moment, your aquarium may contain potentially dangerous levels of dihydrogen monoxide (DHMO)!!! Read more about it here: http://www.dhmo.org/
I read that... Isn't that like...H2O? Am I missing something?


The reasoning behind organic fertilizers in the garden is that it actually improves the soil whereas straight fertilizer (say, 10-10-10) tends to do little other than help the plants grow at the expense of the soil. Errr.... There are no trace elements or anything in it.

What - nobody wants to toss bat guano in their tanks? LOL!

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post #11 of 25 (permalink) Old 05-30-2006, 09:09 PM
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Several have used guano.
Several use worm castings.


The soil is better with organics due to the carbon sources added, NPK alone is not much and does not foster and diversed community of bacteria and by products of their metabolism.

This can impact different taste etc .
Ecologically this is better and from many folk's taste buds it does also.
But farming, the rawness of of it, the inorganic ferts tend to be the best.

For our tanks, well, we have a fair amount of carbon from the plants/mulm accumulation is fine initially but as things get gooey and dirty, we do not want "mud" like a terrestrial system.

So in organic ferts work well, they are also easy to test for and measure and are bioavailable, whereas many organic ferts are broken down slowly etc.

This makes them very hard to measure and needing different test methods to do so.

I toyed with the idea of oerganic ferts for planted tanks about 5 years ago.

But non CO2 tanks do this well as it is.
You will get the best results by adding a bit of both in there.

As we do anyway(unless you have no shrimp, snails, fish etc).

Of course many of you love to herbicides(simazine, copper, peroxide, bleach etc)

I generally don't unless it's on non living equipment etc.



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Tom Barr




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post #12 of 25 (permalink) Old 05-30-2006, 09:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TINNGG
BTW, for those of us who are "organic", the word "chemical" has a whole bunch of unpleasant associations and also brings about the question: There are oodles of organic alternatives for our garden plants - alfalfa meal, blood and bone meals, sea weed, fish emulsion, various manures. Why has nobody come up with an alternative for our aquarium plants? (well, besides feeding the fish too much)
if i was eating or smoking my aquarium plants i probably would want to grow them organically. since i'm not ingesting it, i see no reason for it.
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post #13 of 25 (permalink) Old 05-31-2006, 03:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SammyP
if i was eating or smoking my aquarium plants i probably would want to grow them organically. since i'm not ingesting it, i see no reason for it.
<slight laugh> I don't eat or smoke my hostas or roses, but other than some bulb food I dumped on my daffodiles this year, they haven't seen anything inorganic since they left the nursery - 6-7 years ago. Should take a picture of the hosta that decided it liked the hooch I was dumping out of a DIY co2 bottle - and I was trying to avoid getting it on the plant. Darned thing still doubled in size from last year to this.

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post #14 of 25 (permalink) Old 05-31-2006, 05:09 PM
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Robert Hudson has some exclusive root tabs he calls Natural Advantage RootGrow Tabs available at Aqua Botanic. They contain sea kelp, which he says "...provides a natural hormone that enhances root and leaf growth."
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post #15 of 25 (permalink) Old 06-01-2006, 08:39 AM
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Why not name the chemical hormone?

hehe

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Tom Barr




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