Ever use this? "Hi-yeild phosphate"... - The Planted Tank Forum
 
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post #1 of 12 (permalink) Old 10-02-2012, 01:40 AM Thread Starter
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Ever use this? "Hi-yeild phosphate"...

Just found this at my local nursery. Cheap cause they're closing down for the winter. I purchased some because of that reason. Going EI... I was looking for this in the "yet another nutrient calc" and couldn't find it to give amounts needed for a 40b.


On the back it says derived from Triple Super Phosphate to give an NPK of 0-45-0. That's it. Seems pretty simple and elemental really. Phosphoric acid t dissolve phosphate. Any thoughts on amounts per gallon, or for a 40b?
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post #2 of 12 (permalink) Old 10-17-2012, 04:36 AM Thread Starter
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post #3 of 12 (permalink) Old 10-17-2012, 05:39 AM
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Last edited by Sotty; 10-17-2012 at 03:50 PM. Reason: deleted
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post #4 of 12 (permalink) Old 10-17-2012, 05:46 AM
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Riskay to say the least...
P is definitely not a good thing to overdose.
What source of N were you going to use to balance your Redfield?
Generally speaking most aquarists use potassium phosphate as their source of phosphorus because k is always in demand and seldom over abundant.
You will be dosing Calcium dihydrogenphosphate which isn't particularly soluable is small h2o volumes. Thus why it is used as a long term fert for large blooming flowers or large p needing fruits it releases slow and will not wash away. Which may cause an issue with ei being many ei people dose with spoons right into the tank. If you make a solution it will need to be big to allow dissolving. It will also add calcium and hydrogen into your regimen. If you already need or plan on supplimenting calcium this may not be an issue.
Imho is save it for this may.
And purchase some p with your other dry goods.... Which would probably cost less than what you have.

Ps you could grow a mean pumpkin with that. Pumpkings can't have enough p!

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post #5 of 12 (permalink) Old 10-17-2012, 12:43 PM
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As TheFoleys says, it isn't very soluble. Wikipedia sites that the solubility in water is only 2g / 100mL water - it is a calcium phosphate afterall (two chemical groups that normally exhibit low solubility). Since it's used as a garden fertilizer, that low solubility is a good thing because the phosphate can be released over a period of time. In the aquarium, that simply means you can't make up a nice stock solution and dose your tank like that. Instead, you may want to try adding it to your filter and letting it dissolve over time. As for how much to add? I have no idea since you don't know the rate at which it will dissolve. (I have to disagree w/ TheFoleys, though - excess phosphate by itself will not cause issues.)
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post #6 of 12 (permalink) Old 10-17-2012, 03:50 PM
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Well now I'm just confused. I based my previous post on the label that said it contains 45% P2O5.

Next two comments people are talking about calcium phosphate. So I did some more googling.

This is the TSP formula I found in a couple papers
Ca(H2PO4)2 + H2O → CaOH+ + 2 H2PO4-

Why does it list having P2O5? Is this just how they do their assay by torching everything in abundant O2 and then measuring the P2O5 left behind?
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post #7 of 12 (permalink) Old 10-19-2012, 01:59 AM
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Just on assumptions only I'd guess that the label is describing the state of the phosphate at the time it is available for uptake by the plants. The other molocules involved are being considered byproduct of getting the end result, and considered erroneous being they will have no consequence in outdoor dirt. Likely the formula is delivered this way for a purpose of consistent supply after multiple watering. If you decide to use it maybe buy a phosphate test kit and measure the results per amount dosed in a test tank.
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post #8 of 12 (permalink) Old 10-19-2012, 04:48 AM
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Conventionally most fertilizers list elemental content as if they came from a group of standard compounds, even though the compound in the fertilizer isn't one of those. I don't know why this is, and it can mislead us non-chemists.

Don't be concerned about the "Redfield Ratio", it means nothing for aquarium fertilizing. And, while you can have too much of anything we put in our tanks, you can have a lot more phosphate than we try for without any problems occurring. One proof of this is that many of us have accidentally put KH2PO4 in our tank thinking it was KNO3, so we had 4X the desired amount. I haven't read where anyone had problems from doing that. I didn't when I did it, and I routinely dose double the EI recommended KH2PO4 dosages with nothing happening that I can see, other than that I don't get green spot algae.

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post #9 of 12 (permalink) Old 10-19-2012, 05:16 AM Thread Starter
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I am thinking about getting a phosphate test kit. I'd like to use this (cause I already bought it and I don't really believe in fertilizing plants outside the aquascaping hobby) I guess the only way, really... is to try it.
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post #10 of 12 (permalink) Old 10-19-2012, 07:28 PM
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Suppose you have problems when you try it. Suppose the fish all die? Will you have saved enough money on the fertilizer to make it worth that risk?

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post #11 of 12 (permalink) Old 10-19-2012, 09:53 PM
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Don't bother with it. Get some KH2PO4 for a few $.




Regards,
Tom Barr
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post #12 of 12 (permalink) Old 10-20-2012, 05:32 AM Thread Starter
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touche... ok. I'll go with another option.
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