Too much CO2? - The Planted Tank Forum
 
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post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 08-30-2012, 11:06 PM Thread Starter
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Too much CO2?

I seem to ALWAYS get a bad outbreak of diatomes whenever I start up a new tank. My new fluval ebi is no exception. I did other day 50% water changes for the first week and a half followed by weekly water changes with DI water.

I use pressurized CO2 and a diffusion disk. I EI dose the recommended rate per this forum of all fertilizers. The tank is certainly not overstocked and it has completely cycled.

The odd thing I noticed in particular with the ebi is that the diatomes are much more dense where the CO2 releases into the tank. I have a dropchecker that reads I'm in a good range, and the fish don't seem to be having any adverse effects. This all makes me think that it isn't too much CO2 but the image possibly says otherwise. (The bottom right side)
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post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 08-31-2012, 08:20 AM
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Probably ammonia. Just a few plants and maybe too much light.
I would change 50% of water twice a week and cut the lightning.

Check out my site about aquarium fertilizing:
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post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 08-31-2012, 12:22 PM
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well being a living organism it needs carbon to survive

algae needs co2 as well believe it or not. co2 is not an algaecide it just helps plants grow better. plants secret horomones and chemicals to protect themselves.. a good growing tank will protect itself from algae. NOT out compete it

diatoms or photosynthetic bacteria but again they need carbon to thrive
make sure flow is good in the tank, and let it mature they should go with time..
get something that eats diatoms. that will shorten their stay in the tank


otherwise diatoms are part of an intricate food network and will NOT hurt ur tank.. (((unless they cover everything.. but u got a real problem then))) .. they will only help feed ur fish in the long run.

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post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 08-31-2012, 03:36 PM Thread Starter
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Yes I understand the general ecology of a tank being an ecologist and all.... The whole point is finding the right balance so that you are encouraging plant growth while not creating an environment that isn't MORE beneficial for undesirable lifeforms (e.g. algea and diatomes).

To do this we typically find the right balance of light, nutrients, and source of carbon so that there is not access of any particular component. In my case I am concerned that maybe I am giving this system too much CO2 or potentially not enough of the other necessities.

It would not be a concern to me if it were not for the fact that I can tell it always seems to effect the initial growth of all my plants by blocking out their light source. The plants grow much faster until the diatomes cover the plants and growth is immediately stunted.

As for fauna I do have both cherry shrimp and ottos that are working at it, but they don't do a great job of cleaning HC in my experience.
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post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 08-31-2012, 06:19 PM
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THAT is entirely not true
u can' put in too much carbon.. at least as far as plants are concerned
i have 4 ppm phosphates in my tank before water changes and usually about 20-30 ppm nitrates before water changes
i don't have algae but there are plenty of nutrients there for them to grow

there is no chemistry balance.. its having healthy plants that u desire. healthy plants will defend the system. not outcompete algae

and even if u test 0-0-0-0 on all nutrients. algae can survive on untraceable nutrient levels

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post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-01-2012, 03:04 AM
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I don't think that too much CO2 is your issue. I think it's timing.

If the diatoms are more dense when you start up a tank, then wait until the cycle completes to add anything flora, fauna, or CO2. IME a week if you have a good seeded filter.

I always have diatoms when I start up a new tank. Part of the cycle process. Once you get your bacteria situated (nitrite and ammonia = 0 ), you can add some Otos or snails to take care of the free food you made. Then throw in some fast growing stems like Hygro Polysperma.

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post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-01-2012, 10:47 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks that is really helpful. If not for anything just knowing that this isn't something I am doing wrong that is causing the diatomes. Everything is cycled so here's to hoping those ottos like to pick off of HC!
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post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-01-2012, 11:04 PM
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Yeah ive almost always gotten diatoms to a certain degree (less in low tech) in new tanks

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post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-02-2012, 01:10 AM
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Diatoms are common in new set tanks even when there is no CO2 added. It seems to just come when conditions are right and leave at their own choosing. When I was doing fish only tanks it was often suggested that it involved elements in the substrate.
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