Benefits of mangroves in a bare bottom grow out? - The Planted Tank Forum
 
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post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 07-07-2012, 11:56 PM Thread Starter
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Benefits of mangroves in a bare bottom grow out?

I'm looking into discus however my schedule leaves very little time for my hobby(obsession). I'm afraid I won't be able to take care of discus like the multiple water changed per day thing, I can do maybe two. Would loading the tank up with mangroves planted in rock wool or hydroton help keep the tank clean? Also Plan on over filtering the hell out of it and having a riccia or riccia duckweed Matt on top for comfort and added soakage. Anyone at all think it can be done? Feeding can be done twice to three times a day so the feeding won't be a problem I'm just really worried about water, I can also set up a ro drip water changer that constantly adds in fresh water while the old water goes to a drain. And just run ro constantly. It's this or I'm chancing in my display where I'll still do large and several water changes


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post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 07-08-2012, 09:32 AM
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Multiple changes per day? Lord I hope you're just joking! And if not then please stop drinking the koolaid.

Straight RO water isn't good for life, so you'd actually need to run a separate drip line so that you're constantly combining a certain percentage of tap water with a certain percentage of RO. You'd nevertheless still want to run the incoming water through an HMA filter before you split it to the tank and to the RO unit. Is your water really so bad that you really have to RO it instead of just filtering it though? Many discus people just use their tap water.

Or you could do like an Ecosystems Refugium and do multiple water changes per decade like this discus expert - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yqdrt...feature=relmfu

Aren't mangroves slow growing? I was thinking of doing a similar thing with Philodendrens. But being able to regularly cull a fast growing floating plant, would certainly help achieve your goals.

Here is an alternative water filtering approach which I was considering myself - https://plantedtank.net/forums/showthread.php?t=182637
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post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 07-08-2012, 10:34 AM
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Well I dont know about any of that but there are a few places you can buy some well established mangroves.
A local nursery sells mangroves ranging from the size of my arm to the size of a dwarf citrus.
If you wanna go that route.


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post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 07-08-2012, 10:41 AM
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The big ones cost some $$$$ though...
I only mention this as they are extraordinarily slow growing plants. So I'm not sure how much starting one from seed will benefit you.


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post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 07-08-2012, 12:55 PM
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I don't know much about discuss or mangroves but I have been playing with terrestrial plants for a few months now.

The return from my external filter pumps water into trays hydro-balls and a mixture of plants. So far I'm having good growth and lots of flowers from the peace lilies. Aluminium plant and spider plant are also growing nicely. Pilea moon valley and fittonia are putting out new leaves but much slower. The nitrate reduction is impressive and could almost certainly be increased with extra light, denser planting, faster growing plants etc.

I would worry about the evaporation levels if the water was at discus temperatures as its already quite high in my subtropical set up. Other than that, it can't do any harm and is very similar in concept to the refugium.
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post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 07-08-2012, 01:21 PM
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With terrestrial plants I'd either cordon off the back few inches of the tank which I'd build out as my in-tank sump, or could be done with a hang on the back refugium which could be filled with biomedia.

I had a thread earlier talking about using terrestrial plants for filtration as well which received some good answers - https://www.plantedtank.net/forums/sh...d.php?t=127021

Terrestrial plants certainly have the aerial advantage in terms of easy access to CO2. Mangroves might be adapted to deal with full-strength tropical sunlight while many other plants might better thrive and grow robustly in lesser light levels we can more easily provide.
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post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 07-08-2012, 03:00 PM Thread Starter
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I chose mangrove because their roots are well known for being nutrient sponges . I have to work but I'll be responding later thanks for your posts


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post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 07-08-2012, 06:40 PM Thread Starter
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The plan was for 50/50 ro/tap in a 55g drum fed by gravity that constantly drips while tank water overflows into a stand pipe on opposite side of tank that drains to outside of the garage. I doubt I'll do it I think I'm going with a single adult discus for my display. I will however set something up with mangroves and test their usefulness


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post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 07-11-2012, 05:25 AM
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Mangroves are more brackish water plants, and sure would not be my first choice for Discus.

Go with assorted house plants, and make sure they have enough light. I have the best luck with Golden Pothos, but have also grown heart leaf Philodendron, and the really fancy Maranta with purple and silver banding on the leaves. I have a lot more plants in pots at the edge of my indoor pond. Just started this, but the sweet potato (from the grocery store) is taking over the small tank it was in, so I have moved it to the pond. I started that in a glass with some toothpicks stuck into it. It was OK, but not great until I moved it to an aquarium with better light. Still stuck out of the water about half way, but WOW the roots and leaves exploded.
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